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NEWS
April 4, 2008
Sadly Ali (Fredo) Yeganeh lost his battle to ALS, on April 2, 2008. He is survived by his wife Maryam, two children Farima and Anthony Shain, former wife Tina Marie Yeganeh, his niece Tina Marie Yeganeh, nephew Rouzbeh Cheganeh. Also survived by sisters, brothers, nieces, nephews, family and many friends. Fredo was loved by all and will be greatly missed. Prayers will be held Friday, 10am at IMEC, 2406 Putty Hill Ave., Parkville, MD. 21234. Interment Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens at 12 noon.
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SPORTS
By Cody Goodwin and The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2014
Kareem Ali Jr., a four-star cornerback out of Sicklerville, N.J., announced Thursday that he'll attend Maryland. Ali had other offers from Penn State, Michigan State and Florida, among other schools. A U.S. Army All-American and member of the 2015 recruiting class, Ali was rated among the top-30 in the country at his position, according to Rivals. The Timber Creek Regional High standout primarily played defensive back, but also returned kicks for the Chargers. The 5-foot-10, 170-pound Ali plans to enroll at Maryland in January.
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NEWS
April 22, 2008
On April 18, 2008, JASMINE MAE JONES - ALI. On Wednesday, memorial services will be held at Vaughn C. Greene Funeral Chapel, 4905 York Road, where the family will receive friends from 11-11:30 A.M., with services to follow. Inquiries to 410-433-7500.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
Dolores Mae Hammond Ali, a retired Social Security Administration technical writer, died of cancer Friday at her Randallstown home. She was 75. Born Dolores Mae Hammond in Baltimore, she was raised on Presstman Street in West Baltimore and was a graduate of Frederick Douglass High School. She attended Morgan State University and American University in Washington. Family members said she was among the first African-American employees hired at the Motor Vehicle Administration at its former Guilford Avenue headquarters.
NEWS
July 27, 2004
On July 26, 2004; LAZINA ALIBOODHOOSINGH, of Glenwood, MD; beloved wife of the late Frederick B. Boodhoosingh; mother of Farida K. Ali-Overholt, Yasmin S. Boodhoosingh and step-son Ralph B. Phillips; sister of Zalina Monaysar Also survived by two sons-in-laws, two grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. Friends may call at National Funeral Home, 7482 Lee Highway, Falls Church, VA, on Tuesday, July 27 from 11 AM until Service Time at 1 PM. Internment to follow in National Memorial Park.
NEWS
February 1, 2005
On January 28, 2005 SYLVIA JOHNSON ALI, Age 106; devoted mother-in-law of Thelma Smith; loving grandmother of Warran, Donald and Michael. She is also survived by five great grandchildren, nine great-great children, two great-great great grandchildren, niece Dorothy Alford, nephew Ernest Briscoe and a host of other relatives and friends. Friends may call at the family owned MARCH FUNERAL HOME WEST, INC., 4300 Wabash Ave. on Tuesday after 8:30 A.M. where the family will receive friends from 6 until 7 P.M. Services will be held on Wednesday, February 2 at St. James Episcopal Church, 1020 W. Lafayette Ave. at 10 A.M. followed by funeral services at 10:30 A.M. See www.marchfh.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | October 14, 2006
When Marconi's restaurant closed in June last year, its patrons worried about what would happen to Ali Morsy, the Baltimore institution's beloved waiter who memorized their drink preferences and always knew which people wanted to skip the anchovies in their chopped salads. Morsy took three weeks off last summer and joined the staff of the Capital Grille at Pratt and Gay streets in the Inner Harbor. He says he's busier than ever and helps serve the 400 people who might show up on a packed Saturday night.
SPORTS
November 26, 1991
CHICAGO -- Ali Gubs proved strongest in the stretch run yesterday, defeating Explosive Type by one length in the featured Lithe Purse at Hawthorne Race Course.Martini Up took third in the 1-mile, 70-yard race for fillies and mares.Ridden by Fernando Valenzuela and timed in 1 minute, 47 1/5 seconds, Ali Gubs paid $9.40, $6.80 and $4.40. Explosive Type returned $12.40 and $8.20, while the show price on Martini Up was $9.20.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | October 8, 1991
Two quotes ring with particular resonance in a new biography of former heavyweight boxing champ Muhammad Ali premiering on cable tonight."I'm actually too good for my time," we hear him saying at a 1967 press conference regarding his banishment from boxing, for refusing on religious grounds to be drafted into the Army.And near the end of this edition of the Arts & Entertainment network's "Biography" (at 8 p.m. and again at midnight), in a clip of fairly recent vintage, he says in sadly halting fashion, "I'm happy to be getting out [of boxing]
SPORTS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2013
Under Armour founder Kevin Plank tried to think of his perfect dinner party. There'd have to be a Beatle, he said, along with Jackie Robinson, Babe Ruth and Mother Teresa. But the No. 1 guest, he said, would be Muhammad Ali. Plank and Ali were among those honored by the Cal Ripken Sr. Foundation at a downtown gala and fundraiser at the Waterfront Marriott on Friday evening. But Plank was not able to have his dinner with "The Greatest. " Ali was unable to travel from his home in Arizona because he is recovering from a recent surgery.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
Center Stage will offer a mix of new, nostalgic and musical for the 2014-2015 season. The new includes a double-header next spring of works by celebrated young American playwright Amy Herzog. "After the Revolution" and "4000 Miles" which set off glowing notices when they received Off-Broadway productions in 2010 and 2011, respectively, will be performed in repertory with shared casts. "I just think Baltimore deserves to know who the most exciting playwrights are now in this country," Kwei-Armah said, "and Amy's one of the bright stars in the firmament.
ENTERTAINMENT
Tionah Lee and For The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2014
Was it all about the creative non-fiction or all of the secrets that Ali's mysterious journal kept from the girls … and A?   After the girls confront Hanna about keeping the journal a secret since Ravenswood, they decide it's time for them to take turns and see what Ali had to share about them. Emily is the first. While reading the journal at home, Emily falls asleep and wakes up to Ali asking her to meet her at the kissing rock. A confused Emily can't tell if she is dreaming or if Ali is visiting her in real life, but still finds time to confront her about all of the things she said about her in the journal -- oh yeah, and about how she failed to share with her that she was never dead.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | September 3, 1996
The Greatest gets his due on TNT tonight."The Drew Carey Show" (8: 30 p.m.-9 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Jamie Lee Curtis does Drew's hair. Not a bad life. ABC."Alex Haley's 'Queen' " (9 p.m.-11 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Halle Berry plays Haley's paternal grandmother, the daughter of a slave and a Civil War colonel of Irish descent, in this two-part adaptation of a book Haley was working on at the time of his death. Part 2 airs 8 p.m.-10 p.m. tomorrow. (The miniseries originally ran six hours.
SPORTS
By MIKE LITTWIN | January 17, 1992
Muhammad Ali turns 50 today. It is very sad. They'll throw him a grand party, at which he'll desperately try to evoke the Ali of his youth and ours -- and fail. When it's over, he'll mumble his thanks and turn away, a man made old before his time. Let's just say it's a different kind of Ali shuffle now.And yet, those close to him -- there are always people who want to be close to him -- will say he's OK, that the disorder, Parkinson's syndrome, isn't as bad as it looks. But you know that it is. Or, anyway, you feel that it is, and because it's Ali, you don't see what there is to celebrate.
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