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By New York Times News Service | December 15, 2002
NEW YORK - Can you perform cosmetic surgery on an adored 100-year-old and still keep her recognizable to the loved ones? The grande dame in question is the venerable Algonquin Hotel, the neo-Renaissance literary landmark and sometime intellectual oasis that was haven to the witerati of the fabled Round Table. The new owners of the hotel, which turned 100 last month, are sprucing up for the centennial. The transformation goes beyond the new six-foot-wide oil painting of the Round Table acolytes, which was installed in the lobby restaurant, replacing a smaller 1998 painting removed by the previous owners.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 15, 2002
NEW YORK - Can you perform cosmetic surgery on an adored 100-year-old and still keep her recognizable to the loved ones? The grande dame in question is the venerable Algonquin Hotel, the neo-Renaissance literary landmark and sometime intellectual oasis that was haven to the witerati of the fabled Round Table. The new owners of the hotel, which turned 100 last month, are sprucing up for the centennial. The transformation goes beyond the new six-foot-wide oil painting of the Round Table acolytes, which was installed in the lobby restaurant, replacing a smaller 1998 painting removed by the previous owners.
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NEWS
May 11, 1992
Sylvia Syms, 73, dubbed the "world's greatest saloon singer" by Frank Sinatra, collapsed and died on stage early yesterday at New York's Algonquin Hotel while performing an encore. Her 1956 rendition of "I Could Have Danced All Night" sold more than 1 million copies.
NEWS
March 3, 2000
Mary Bodne, 93, an owner of New York's Algonquin Hotel for 41 years, died Monday. She had lived at the elegant hotel, the literary hangout of the Jazz Age, since 1946. Baron Enrico di Portanova, 66, jet-setter and grandson of Texas oil magnate Hugh Roy Cullen, died Monday of throat cancer. His life included high-profile legal wrangling over the immense Cullen family estate, elaborate parties attended by the rich and famous, and lavish homes in Houston, Acapulco, Mexico, and Italy. George Duning, 92, whose musical scores for movies such as "Picnic" and "From Here to Eternity" earned him Academy Award nominations, died Tuesday of heart disease in San Diego.
FEATURES
By Jack Mathews and Jack Mathews,Newsday | May 12, 1994
Movie fans hoping to see major American stars at the 47th Cannes Film Festival getting under way tonight will pretty much have to settle for the daily glimpses of jury president Clint Eastwood walking into screenings.The competition films that Mr. Eastwood and his fellow jurors, Catherine Deneuve among them, will judge are conspicuously absent of prominent American movies. There is only one major studio picture on the schedule, Warner Bros.' "The Hudsucker Proxy," and its selection seems more an honorarium for the Coen brothers, who won the Golden Palm with their last film, "Barton Fink."
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | January 4, 1995
"Pulp Fiction," the exuberant, innovatively structured crime drama directed by Quentin Tarantino, was named the best film of 1994 by the National Society of Film Critics yesterday. Voting at the Algonquin Hotel in New York, the 42-member group also cited Mr. Tarantino as best director and gave its best-screenplay prize to him and Roger Avary as the film's co-writers.Jennifer Jason Leigh was voted best actress for her performance as the caustic, brittle heroine of "Mrs. Parker and the Vicious Circle."
TRAVEL
By Richard P. Carpenter and Richard P. Carpenter,Boston Globe | May 20, 2007
All of Canada is a delight in summer and each province of Atlantic Canada -- New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and Newfoundland and Labrador -- offers something special. Here is a sampling: St. Andrews by-the-Sea, New Brunswick, is one of the most charming towns in Canada. The people are friendly, the shops are unique, and whale watching is a popular activity. The landmark Fairmont Algonquin hotel offers the Bay of Fundy Sea Kayaking Package, which includes a night's accommodation and a three-hour sea kayaking excursion on the bay. The package, valid through Sept.
NEWS
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | November 1, 2009
A few years ago, Sylvia McNair felt she had reached "the bottom of the bottom." Not long after discovering that her husband of two decades wanted out of their marriage, she learned that she had breast cancer and might have only six months to live. Today, the Ohio-born soprano could not look healthier or happier as she rehearses a new work fashioned out of Kurt Weill songs and created expressly for her by the American Opera Theater; it premieres this week at Baltimore's Theatre Project.
NEWS
By Marion Meade and Marion Meade,Special to The Sun | March 19, 1995
'Genius in Disguise: Harold Ross of The New Yorker,' by ThomasKunkel. 497 pages. New York: Random House. $25 The best reason to read a literary biography about the editor of a humor magazine is to be entertained, at least every now and then. But there is little fun in 'Genius in Disguise,' the life of Harold Ross (1892-1951), founder and first editor of the New Yorker and a great eccentric.Ross was an unlikely person to create a sophisticated magazine. The son of a Colorado silver prospector, he dropped out of school in the 10th grade to become an itinerant reporter.
FEATURES
By John Johnson and John Johnson,Los Angeles Times | February 11, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- The silver-haired man who looks a little like Spencer Tracy bends over the table to get some mental leverage as he hauls up a cobwebbed memory about how they shot the movie "Jesse James."When someone asks: "Who were the stars?" John "Bear" Hudkins waves off the question. They were Henry Fonda and Tyrone Power, but that is not important.What is important is the stuntmen. Hudkins was just a novice when the film was made and Cliff Lyons and Yakima Canutt, two of the all-time greats at falling off buildings and being dragged by horses, decided to teach him a lesson.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | December 28, 1992
In some ways, it is nothing like lunch at the Algonquin Round Table with Dorothy Parker, Robert Benchley and company back in the '20s and early '30s.Lunch in those Prohibition days was booze disguised in tea cups, plus club sandwiches and maybe half a pack of Camels. The New Yorker magazine was born at the Algonquin Hotel's round table, they say, and it was there that Miss Parker, on hearing of Calvin Coolidge's death, asked, "How can they tell?"In other ways the lunch scene at the Royalton Hotel, diagonally across from the Algonquin on West 44th Street, near Fifth Avenue, is every bit as clubby as the old round table.
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