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NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,SUN REPORTER | October 18, 2007
Chanting their familiar refrain, "No education, no life," an estimated 300 city students and supporters met at City Hall and marched along downtown streets yesterday demanding that the governor pay the school system $800 million from a court decision. Under the leadership of the Baltimore Algebra Project, the protesters demanded funding to comply with a 2004 ruling that said the city schools had been unlawfully underfunded by $400 million to $800 million since 2000. The Baltimore Algebra Project, a student-run tutoring group, had planned the protest for weeks.
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NEWS
By Ruma Kumar and Ruma Kumar,Sun reporter | February 7, 2008
Twenty-five protesters, most of them Baltimore high school students, were detained yesterday after they charged up the steps of the State House demanding that Gov. Martin O'Malley be arrested for not addressing what they called a "historic underfunding" of Maryland public schools. The demonstrators were handcuffed as they lay still, as if dead, before the bronze doors of the building. They had pressed past more than a dozen police officers, strung crime-scene tape along the stair railings of the State House and called O'Malley's budget proposal to slow the rate of education funding increases "a crime."
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NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | February 3, 2005
About 200 Baltimore students, parents and activists rallied outside City Hall yesterday - the latest in a series of demonstrations over the amount of state funding for city schools. The event, organized by the Algebra Project, a student-run tutoring program that has its roots in the civil rights movement of the 1960s, ended with an early afternoon march from City Hall to the state Board of Education's headquarters on West Baltimore Street. For more than a year, the "math literacy workers" who run the program have been trying to spread awareness of a state judge's ruling in the Bradford v. Maryland school funding case in 2000.
NEWS
By Jay Gillen | January 23, 2008
Does it make it worse that Zachariah Hallback, 18, who was recently robbed and murdered at a bus stop, was a "good kid" who fought for justice with Baltimore's Algebra Project and sang with the choir in Israel Baptist Church? Does it make it worse that he was an innocent victim and not a drug dealer? He was no angel. Like all of us, Zack was human. Sometimes he did well, sometimes not; he helped and harmed. None of us is different. Why do some victims merit an outpouring of civic sympathy and others not?
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | April 13, 2004
During the city school system's financial crisis, while politicians bickered, and parents and community members spewed, one group emerged time and again as a powerful voice -- using reason and research to make itself heard. Members of the Baltimore Algebra Project, a student-run organization that tutors middle- and high-school students, launched a steady campaign to inform their 90,000 peers about the problems the school system faced because of a $58 million accumulated deficit. They staged walkouts and rallies, and theirs has been the one student group to gain a private audience with top school officials, as well as with an influential Circuit Court judge.
NEWS
October 12, 1990
Former civil rights activist Robert Moses will visit Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church, Druid Hill Avenue and Lanvale Street, tomorrow to help dedicate the new Bethel Outreach Center and to discuss his Algebra Project.Moses, who served as field secretary of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and helped implement the Mississippi Summer Project of 1964, an effort to register black voters, will be on hand with church and community leaders at 10 a.m. for the open house and dedication ceremony for the new center at nearby McCulloh and Mosher streets.
NEWS
By Jay Gillen | January 23, 2008
Does it make it worse that Zachariah Hallback, 18, who was recently robbed and murdered at a bus stop, was a "good kid" who fought for justice with Baltimore's Algebra Project and sang with the choir in Israel Baptist Church? Does it make it worse that he was an innocent victim and not a drug dealer? He was no angel. Like all of us, Zack was human. Sometimes he did well, sometimes not; he helped and harmed. None of us is different. Why do some victims merit an outpouring of civic sympathy and others not?
NEWS
By SARA NEUFELD and SARA NEUFELD,SUN REPORTER | April 26, 2006
Students from the Baltimore Algebra Project, a tutoring and advocacy group, filed a motion in Circuit Court yesterday asking for the right to temporarily take over the powers of the state school board so they can request $800 million for the city schools. If Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. doesn't respond to that request and allocate the money, the motion says, "we will also temporarily take over the duties of the Governor." The motion was filed with Judge Joseph H.H. Kaplan, who presides over a long-running school funding case.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Sara Neufeld and Gus G. Sentementes and Sara Neufeld,sun reporters | January 17, 2008
Though he had dropped out of high school and was completing his GED, Zachariah Hallback had found a cause to believe in: improving inner-city schools. The 18-year-old was an advocate with the Baltimore Algebra Project, a student-run tutoring group known for its passionate stance on improving education. He regularly wore on his hat a button displaying the group's slogan, "No Education, No Life." Hallback was shot in a robbery last Wednesday at a bus stop in front of two friends at East 33rd Street and The Alameda in Northeast Baltimore.
NEWS
By Ruma Kumar and Ruma Kumar,Sun reporter | February 7, 2008
Twenty-five protesters, most of them Baltimore high school students, were detained yesterday after they charged up the steps of the State House demanding that Gov. Martin O'Malley be arrested for not addressing what they called a "historic underfunding" of Maryland public schools. The demonstrators were handcuffed as they lay still, as if dead, before the bronze doors of the building. They had pressed past more than a dozen police officers, strung crime-scene tape along the stair railings of the State House and called O'Malley's budget proposal to slow the rate of education funding increases "a crime."
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Sara Neufeld and Gus G. Sentementes and Sara Neufeld,sun reporters | January 17, 2008
Though he had dropped out of high school and was completing his GED, Zachariah Hallback had found a cause to believe in: improving inner-city schools. The 18-year-old was an advocate with the Baltimore Algebra Project, a student-run tutoring group known for its passionate stance on improving education. He regularly wore on his hat a button displaying the group's slogan, "No Education, No Life." Hallback was shot in a robbery last Wednesday at a bus stop in front of two friends at East 33rd Street and The Alameda in Northeast Baltimore.
NEWS
December 10, 2007
Build better schools from the bottom up After years of trying to "turn around its worst schools" without making sufficient investment in our teachers and children, Maryland public officials are discouraged ("Fixing schools usually fails," Dec. 6). But it would be a shame if the citizenry concludes that low-income children just can't learn. We should try listening to the teens who really want an education, such as the math literacy workers of the Baltimore Algebra Project. They're more frustrated than any of us adults are. But they have a prescription for improving education that makes sense: Provide arts, music, sports, challenging academics and every other aspect of a comprehensive education for every child; build new schools and renovate crumbling ones; have classes with fewer students so teachers can give individual attention; and provide jobs for every teenager who will work.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,SUN REPORTER | October 18, 2007
Chanting their familiar refrain, "No education, no life," an estimated 300 city students and supporters met at City Hall and marched along downtown streets yesterday demanding that the governor pay the school system $800 million from a court decision. Under the leadership of the Baltimore Algebra Project, the protesters demanded funding to comply with a 2004 ruling that said the city schools had been unlawfully underfunded by $400 million to $800 million since 2000. The Baltimore Algebra Project, a student-run tutoring group, had planned the protest for weeks.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,sun reporter | January 10, 2007
A Baltimore school board meeting was disrupted last night by student protesters who interrupted the agenda to demand support as they seek $1 billion for city schools. Meanwhile, about 250 parents, children and staff members from three Baltimore schools run by Edison Schools Inc. turned out to urge officials to renew the company's expiring contract. The protesters were from the Baltimore Algebra Project, a student tutoring and advocacy group. They were unable to secure one of the 10 spots for public comment at the meeting because of the crowd from Edison.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,Sun reporter | October 14, 2006
Calling education the next step in the civil rights movement, hundreds of Baltimore students are planning to take to the streets today to demand a $1 billion commitment to the city schools from the gubernatorial candidates. Students are calling their campaign "Freedom Fall 2006," modeled after Freedom Summer 1964, when thousands of civil rights activists descended on Mississippi to assert the right of disenfranchised blacks to vote. The protest is being led by the Baltimore Algebra Project, a student tutoring and advocacy group.
NEWS
By SARA NEUFELD and SARA NEUFELD,SUN REPORTER | April 26, 2006
Students from the Baltimore Algebra Project, a tutoring and advocacy group, filed a motion in Circuit Court yesterday asking for the right to temporarily take over the powers of the state school board so they can request $800 million for the city schools. If Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. doesn't respond to that request and allocate the money, the motion says, "we will also temporarily take over the duties of the Governor." The motion was filed with Judge Joseph H.H. Kaplan, who presides over a long-running school funding case.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,Sun reporter | October 14, 2006
Calling education the next step in the civil rights movement, hundreds of Baltimore students are planning to take to the streets today to demand a $1 billion commitment to the city schools from the gubernatorial candidates. Students are calling their campaign "Freedom Fall 2006," modeled after Freedom Summer 1964, when thousands of civil rights activists descended on Mississippi to assert the right of disenfranchised blacks to vote. The protest is being led by the Baltimore Algebra Project, a student tutoring and advocacy group.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | October 29, 2000
SOMETHING extraordinary is happening here. There's this skinny runt of a high school kid, see, wearing glasses with his baseball cap turned to the back, talking to an auditorium full of college students and professors. "Everybody remember what a prime factor is?" the kid asks. Murmurs rumble throughout the audience. The tone suggests what everyone is saying. "Sure we do, kid. Sure we do." It's not that the sarcasm dripped freely. It just kind of oozed out. This mattered not to the high-schooler, who pressed on with the rules of the game.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | February 3, 2005
About 200 Baltimore students, parents and activists rallied outside City Hall yesterday - the latest in a series of demonstrations over the amount of state funding for city schools. The event, organized by the Algebra Project, a student-run tutoring program that has its roots in the civil rights movement of the 1960s, ended with an early afternoon march from City Hall to the state Board of Education's headquarters on West Baltimore Street. For more than a year, the "math literacy workers" who run the program have been trying to spread awareness of a state judge's ruling in the Bradford v. Maryland school funding case in 2000.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | April 13, 2004
During the city school system's financial crisis, while politicians bickered, and parents and community members spewed, one group emerged time and again as a powerful voice -- using reason and research to make itself heard. Members of the Baltimore Algebra Project, a student-run organization that tutors middle- and high-school students, launched a steady campaign to inform their 90,000 peers about the problems the school system faced because of a $58 million accumulated deficit. They staged walkouts and rallies, and theirs has been the one student group to gain a private audience with top school officials, as well as with an influential Circuit Court judge.
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