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By David Eggenschwiler | January 8, 2007
LOS ANGELES -- Every year, as many high school seniors struggle with basic algebra, people complain, "Who needs it? How many students will ever use it?" Well, I use it every day. I'm using it now, even though I haven't worked an algebraic equation since my son was in the seventh grade several years ago. Mathematics and science are unnatural practices. As physics professor Alan Cromer has brutally and elegantly written, "The human mind wasn't designed to study physics," and of course mathematics is the language of physics.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2013
Jun-ichi Igusa, a retired Johns Hopkins university professor of mathematics who researched number theory and algebraic geometry, died of a stroke Nov. 24 at the Holly Hill Nursing Home. The Hunt Valley resident was 89. "He was a giant in his field," said Bernard Shiffman, chair of the Hopkins mathematics department. "He was meticulous in everything he did. Even when he taught elementary calculus, he was thorough and prepared his classes perfectly. He was warm to people and interested in helping his students.
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NEWS
By LIZ BOWIE and LIZ BOWIE,SUN REPORTER | August 22, 2006
CLARIFICATION In a table in yesterday's editions showing the percentage of students who passed Maryland's High School Assessment in algebra, the totals for the state and each school system appeared higher than the scores for individual high schools would indicate. The reason is that the totals included the results not just for high schools, but for middle school students who took the test. Those who take the algebra test in middle school tend to have higher pass rates because they include the most advanced math students, school officials say. More than 70 percent of last year's ninth-graders who took state proficiency tests in algebra, government and biology have passed the exams - results state officials said mean most other members of the Class of 2009 should be able to pass the tests, as required, before they graduate.
NEWS
msaarbach1@gmail.com | April 25, 2013
Congratulations to the Dulaney High School Math team participants Minwei Cao, Jay Han, Casey Lim, Heetaek Lim and Lisa Ann Tang who were the winners of $1000 for their solution to the Moody's Mega Math Challenge recycling problem: Waste not, Want not: Putting Recyclables in their Place. Their 19-page solution was in the top 43 of 1,054 solutions submitted. In addition, Jay Han was the school winner of the American Mathematics Competition and scored well enough to compete in the second round competition - The American Invitational Mathematics Competition.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | October 20, 2004
Typically, algebra is a ninth-grade course - but more children at Severna Park Middle School took the course than at any other middle school in Maryland last year, school officials said. And all of its algebra students have passed the algebra component of the state's High School Assessment for the past three years. Those achievements drew a visit to the school yesterday from Nancy S. Grasmick, state superintendent of schools. "It's just amazing, when we have high expectations for students, how they have responded," she said after her tour.
NEWS
By Ruma Kumar and Ruma Kumar,sun reporter | September 14, 2007
Disappointed by declining pass rates on state algebra tests, Anne Arundel County school officials are searching for ways to energize performance on a "gateway" subject that students need to graduate - and succeed in a rapidly evolving local work force of engineers and scientists. Barely seven of out of 10 high school freshmen passed last spring's state algebra test, which includes sections on data analysis and probability. The percentage of students passing the algebra test dropped four points since 2004, even as other subjects logged impressive gains . The data reveal an Achilles' heel in a district that is increasing its effort to have students take higher level math and science.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Sara Neufeld and Liz F. Kay and Sara Neufeld,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2005
Maryland high schoolers lost ground in biology and algebra, and barely improved in government, in the latest batch of standardized test scores released yesterday. Nearly half of all students would be out of luck if a passing score was required for a diploma right now. That requirement kicks in with this fall's freshmen, and state education officials predict a big jump in performance as a result. Fifty-eight percent of students tested in biology passed the exam, down from 61 percent last year.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | October 20, 2004
Typically, algebra is a ninth-grade course - but more children at Severna Park Middle School took the course than at any other middle school in Maryland last year, school officials said. And all of its algebra pupils have passed the algebra component of the state's High School Assessment for the past three years. Those achievements drew a visit to the school yesterday from Nancy S. Grasmick, state superintendent of schools. "It's just amazing, when we have high expectations for students, how they have responded," she said after her tour.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | February 6, 2002
SOME OF the state's leading professors are questioning Maryland's algebra standards, saying in a petition that they promote "pretend algebra" that is "actually fifth- or sixth-grade arithmetic." Forty professors at the University of Maryland, College Park and the Johns Hopkins University have signed the document, which calls on state educators to beef up algebra and align it "with the most rigorous international state content standards available." Among signers are the chairman of Hopkins' math department and several distinguished academics at College Park.
NEWS
By David Tager | November 5, 2012
I am about to be highly critical of the new math curriculum to which our children are being subjected. Before doing so, let me state for the record that I am not a Philistine. Personally, I happen to enjoy math - enough to return to school after retirement and take college-level courses to find out what this thing I'd heard of, calculus, was all about. I am not an educator. My wife and I are college graduates. We have two sons, one of whom was graduated from college and one grandson who is currently in the eighth grade and who will probably attend Poly.
NEWS
By David Tager | November 5, 2012
I am about to be highly critical of the new math curriculum to which our children are being subjected. Before doing so, let me state for the record that I am not a Philistine. Personally, I happen to enjoy math - enough to return to school after retirement and take college-level courses to find out what this thing I'd heard of, calculus, was all about. I am not an educator. My wife and I are college graduates. We have two sons, one of whom was graduated from college and one grandson who is currently in the eighth grade and who will probably attend Poly.
EXPLORE
January 31, 2012
The first World Flipped Classroom Open House was held Jan. 30 in two countries, 20 states and more than 30 cities and towns - including Brooklandville, where a teacher at St. Paul's School for Girls took part in a demonstration of "flipped learning. " Dawn Adams, chair of the SPSG Math Department, is using flipped learning to teach Algebra I and II. A fan of educational "flipping," Adams creates a math lesson on video, then delivers it to her students outside the traditional classroom setting.
NEWS
January 17, 2012
You can hear, in the dispute about singular they and other issues of grammar and usage, a complaint that a usage objected to is not logical. For example, the objection to the double negative is that two negatives make a positive. In mathematics, yes. But step up, you two-negatives-make-a positive people. I want to hear you say that the first time you heard Jagger sing “I can't get no satisfaction,” you understood him to mean “I'm satisfied.” At the Geoffrey Pullum post on singular they at Lingua Franca that I wrote about yesterday, a copy editor writing as odarp thought he could put Professor Pullum on the spot, asking, “If 'they' can be singular, why does it always take a plural verb?
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | May 4, 2011
Ethel L. Sellman, a retired Harford County French teacher who was known for her elaborate dinners, died April 28 of complications from a stroke at her Aberdeen home. She was 92. Ethel Onetta Estelle Lauterbach was born in a Biddison Avenue rowhouse and later moved with her family in 1928 to Mount Airy, where her parents owned and operated Hillside Poultry Farm. Mrs. Sellman was 14 when she graduated in 1933 from Mount Airy High School and enrolled at Western Maryland College, where she earned her bachelor's degree in 1937, majoring in French, algebra and social studies.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2010
Marion G. Stringer, a retired Notre Dame Preparatory School algebra teacher, died Thursday of complications from a fall she suffered at her Towson home. She was 90 and at her death was a resident of Oak Crest Care Center. Born Marion Augusta Guidera and raised in Westbury, N.Y., she took awards in mathematics as a student at Adelphi University and then worked as a data analyst and project manager at Hooper Ratings in Manhattan during the 1940s. She married Harry Stringer, a wholesale building supplies salesman, in 1948 and lived in Kansas City and St. Paul, Minn.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,liz.bowie@baltsun.com | November 29, 2009
As Maryland attempts to increase the rigor of math education, the first results of an Algebra II test given to a small number of students in the state show less than one in five are prepared for entry-level college courses. Fifteen states, including Maryland, joined together in 2005 to take part in the American Diploma Project, an effort to raise academic standards and graduation requirements for high schools around the country. The Algebra II test was given to 100,000 students across the nation, including 1,295 in Maryland, and showed that nationwide, 15 percent are prepared for their first college course.
NEWS
By JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV and JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV,SUN REPORTER | August 23, 2006
A double dose of math and an ounce of intervention are being credited for double-digit growth in Howard County students' algebra scores on the state's most recent High School Assessment tests. Overall, the system's scores increased in algebra, biology, and government, according to data released this week by the Maryland Department of Education. Students in Howard County's 12 high schools made the biggest gains in algebra, increasing 10.9 percentage points to an overall 85.2 passing percentage.
NEWS
By LIZ F. KAY and LIZ F. KAY,SUN REPORTER | October 17, 2005
When Mike Manik tried to help his son with his middle school math homework, the only real lifeline seemed to be the answers in the back of the textbook. "Helpless" is how the 38-year-old Rosedale man described his situation - "I wouldn't recognize the things I was looking at." But last week, Manik returned to the school where he had flunked algebra two decades ago. This time, he sat in the front row of the classroom with other parents, reviewing the order of operations and debating the best use for means, medians or modes.
NEWS
By Lindsay Kalter and Lindsay Kalter,lindsay.kalter@baltsun.com | February 28, 2009
Officials at Anne Arundel's Chesapeake High School are attempting to find those responsible for tampering recently with software that contains student grades by using classified log-in information. Administrators became aware of the incident last week and are investigating, said Bob Mosier, public information officer for Anne Arundel County schools. He said that who was involved and the way in which the log-in information was obtained have not been determined. "Whoever did it is in violation of the school's computer-use policy and academic integrity policy," Mosier said yesterday.
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