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Tim Wheeler | April 29, 2012
In their quest to cure Baltimore's ailing harbor, advocates and authorities have tried one gadget after another: floating wetlands, a solar-powered aerator, even a trash wheel. Add now the "algal turf scrubber," a long wooden sluiceway in which harbor water is pumped over a bed of slimy green algae. The ecological restoration firm Biohabitats and the Living Classrooms Foundation invited news media to see the contraption set up on a former chromium plant site in Fells Point. The gutter, 350 feet long by one foot wide, uses native algae to strip nutrients, suspended sediment and carbon from water and inject oxygen into it before returning it to the harbor.
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By Tim Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
The crisis may have eased in Toledo , but the toxic algae in Lake Erie that contaminated the water supply for 500,000 people in Ohio continues to plague lakes and rivers across the country, including here in Maryland. Lake Williston, a swimming hole for a Girl Scout camp in Caroline County, is off limits this summer because of  dangerous levels of a toxin in its water.  So is 75-acre Lake Needwood in Rock Creek Regional Park in Montgomery County.  Same for Northwest Creek, a 100-acre impoundment on Kent Island in Queen Anne's County.
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By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2010
Visitors who expect to see clear waters at Columbia's Lake Elkhorn after a multimillion-dollar dredging is complete in December will likely find algae and vines thriving again next spring, despite rising cost estimates for removing decades' worth of sediment. Without dredging, Columbia's man-made lakes would eventually fill in with sediment and plants, reverting over decades to the stream valleys they once were. The two largest, 37-acre Elkhorn, and 27-acre Lake Kittamaqundi, have never been completely dredged.
SPORTS
By Matt Schnabel and Tim Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2014
For years, those fishing in East Coast waterways have faced bans on felt-soled boots and urgings that they scrub their gear to combat the spread of a pervasive algae. But a recent Dartmouth College study could turn such thinking on its head. Didymo, a species of diatom that produces threadlike stalks called "rock snot" blooms, long has been believed to represent an invasive threat to bodies of water across the nation, but the algae is largely native to those areas, according to the study.
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By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2012
Tyler S. Gee, 16, can add several descriptives after his name, including rising junior at Hereford High School and aspiring Eagle Scout and aerospace engineer. Now he can tack on one more — riverkeeper — because of his efforts to deter the spread of an invasive algae found in the Gunpowder River. The Hereford resident has built eight wader washing stations, to state-established specifications, and positioned them along the northern Baltimore County waterway. Each wooden platform has a stiff brush, a basin of salt water, directions for use and a brief history of didymo, a freshwater algae that, if left unchecked, can spread and destroy aquatic life.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 30, 1992
Scientists say they have found that "phantom" algae are responsible for mysterious mass kills that have destroyed millions of fish.The toxic algae, which have not been given a scientific name, were found in the Pamlico and Neuse estuaries in North Carolina. They appear in the water as if out of nowhere, kill hordes of fish in estuaries and fish farms by releasing poisons, and just as quickly disappear.Because the algae can survive in everything from fresh water to the salinity of the open sea, the scientists say they suspect that these resilient and powerful killers are likely to be widespread.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 23, 1995
Thousands of water birds that died mysteriously at the Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge seem to have been poisoned by a toxic form of algae that blooms in the huge, salty lake, according to new findings by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.Clark Bloom -- manager of the federal refuge in farm-rich Imperial County, Calif., near the U.S.-Mexico border -- said the discovery, although preliminary, is a great relief because the bird deaths have perplexed and worried wildlife biologists since they began three years ago."
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff Writer | March 16, 1993
It sits stone still on the bay floor, a seed encased in a shell, waiting.As fish swim by, it rouses and releases a toxic chemical into the water. In hours, thousands, perhaps millions of fish are dead, and the killer, sated on its victims' flesh, has returned to slumber in the sediment.It is not a new movie starring Sigourney Weaver. It's a newly identified alga, and it has arrived at a bay near you.This hybrid plant-animal microbe -- known to have killed more than a billion fish in six weeks in North Carolina -- has been discovered in a tributary of the Choptank River in Cambridge.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,Sun reporter | August 9, 2008
John Neukam has been catching crabs in pots near the Middle River for decades. But this year, the crabs have been dying in the water, suffocated by a bright green algae bloom that is choking off oxygen and worrying watermen and recreational boaters. "You crab all week, you get a bushel and a half in your live box, and they die," said Neukam, after checking his pots yesterday morning. "I've been here all my life - 64 years - and we've only had this one other time, when fertilizer from a farm seeped into the cove."
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,Sun reporter | August 1, 2007
An algae bloom appears to be the culprit behind dead fish found floating in the Inner Harbor yesterday morning, according to state environmental investigators. The fish kill - the second in the harbor in two months attributed to an algae bloom - was first reported by residents who complained about a stench Monday night. Most of the fish appeared to be scattered on the south side of the harbor near the marina and Rash Field. There were other fish closer to the Constellation, including some that washed up onto the concrete barrier.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2013
When Jim Wilson retired from the federal government four years ago, he and his wife moved to Kent Island, where they initially enjoyed watching ospreys fishing in Northwest Creek from their waterfront home. But now, Wilson and most others living around the creek stay out of the murky water, which has turned yellow-green the past two summers. Even the ospreys steer clear of it, he said. Fish kills and stubborn "blooms" of blue-green algae, which at times form a floating scum, plague Northwest Creek.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2013
The 10-foot-tall cylinders glow neon yellow and orange, looking like something out of a futuristic dance club. They're actually an experiment with global implications - an effort to see how well algae can wipe out pollution belched by power plants. The Howard County startup running these bioreactors hasn't hit on an entirely new idea. The U.S. Department of Energy started funding projects related to algae and power plants at least 35 years ago, but the focus largely has been on growing algae for fuel.
FEATURES
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2012
Tyler S. Gee, 16, can add several descriptives after his name, including rising junior at Hereford High School and aspiring Eagle Scout and aerospace engineer. Now he can tack on one more — riverkeeper — because of his efforts to deter the spread of an invasive algae found in the Gunpowder River. The Hereford resident has built eight wader washing stations, to state-established specifications, and positioned them along the northern Baltimore County waterway. Each wooden platform has a stiff brush, a basin of salt water, directions for use and a brief history of didymo, a freshwater algae that, if left unchecked, can spread and destroy aquatic life.
HEALTH
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2012
The fish kills that have plagued Baltimore's Inner Harbor and nearby creeks over the past two weeks may have eased with the dip in temperatures, but scientists caution that's not the last we've seen of potentially toxic and even deadly algae blooms in area waters. As summer heats up again, potentially dangerous microorganisms could bloom in the wake of algae blamed for suffocating fish from Dundalk to Annapolis. Officials are keeping tabs on the growth of algae around the Chesapeake Bay that have poisoned tens of thousands of fish — including one type found blooming in a Cecil County river that has in the past killed two dogs and can also be fatal to humans.
NEWS
May 31, 2012
On the wave of unwanted publicity over unruly youths downtown, owners of businesses around the Inner Harbor were probably none too thrilled to have the smell of dead fish wafting through the air last weekend. Naturally, they brushed it off as having no impact on tourism - but you can bet that the odor was about as welcome as another Pat McDonough press conference. The likely culprit was mahogany tide, an algae that feeds on excess nutrients. This creates huge blooms that eventually die, rot and suck the oxygen out of the water, leaving other forms of aquatic life to suffocate.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2012
Dead fish continued to surface Tuesday in Baltimore-area waters, though the conditions that scientists believe have been causing the weeklong die-off may be moderating slightly. State investigators estimated there were 10,000 fish floating in Stoney Creek in northern Anne Arundel County and in its tributaries, Back Cove, Beehive Cove and Nabbs Creek, according to Samantha Kappalman, spokeswoman for the Maryland Department of the Environment. She emailed that "several thousand," mostly menhaden, were bunched up by the Fort Smallwood Road bridge.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie | December 3, 1991
Sneaky little algae that pop up from the mud of a bay, attack fish with a deadly toxin, then quickly retreat may explain some mysterious fish kills in the Chesapeake and other East Coast waters.North Carolina researchers recently discovered the new species -- nearly by mistake -- then found it at the scene of a crime: a major fish kill in May in Pamlico Sound along the coast of North Carolina. While scientists have not yet looked for the algae species in Chesapeake Bay waters, it has sparked their curiosity because it could explain numerous fish kills, particularly of menhaden, in the Chesapeake and tidal portions of its tributaries.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2012
A powerful stench was in the air Saturday at the Inner Harbor as 12-year-olds Alison Chase and Marissa Westerbeke hunched over the water's edge, studying tiny crabs floating to the surface. The girls were in town from Connecticut for a relaxing annual vacation with Alison's family, but the pervasive smell of dead fish and rotting plant matter — caused by a massive algae bloom — had them totally grossed out. "It's, like, sad and disgusting," said Marissa. "It's gross.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2012
Something's rotten on the Baltimore area waterfront. Fish are washing ashore by the thousands in a mass die-off that officials say appears to be caused by a weather-driven worsening of the pollution that chronically plagues the Chesapeake Bay. State investigators expanded their probe Wednesday into what they believe are algae-related fish kills in Marley, Furnace and Curtis creeks in Glen Burnie, raising the estimated death toll there tenfold, while...
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