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NEWS
April 15, 1997
Michael Dorris,52, an adoptive parent of children with fetal alcohol syndrome and author of a prize-winning book on the subject, died Thursday or Friday in Concord, N.H., a family friend said.The Concord Monitor reported that Mr. Dorris was found Friday in a Concord motel room. Police said the death appeared to have been a suicide. The newspaper said he apparently suffocated himself using a plastic bag.Mr. Dorris won a National Book Critics Circle award in 1989 in the nonfiction category for "The Broken Cord," a first-person account of how fetal alcohol syndrome affected his eldest son, Abel, who died.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | May 1, 2003
Alfred Stieglitz, the embattled genius who practically single-handedly dragged photography into the 20th century, was a tireless writer, publisher and gallery owner as well as a gifted photographer in his own right. Stieglitz wrote or edited hundreds of articles championing the artists he admired -- from photographers Edward Steichen and Paul Strand to painters Pablo Picasso and Henri Matisse to sculptor Auguste Rodin. Much of his criticism appeared in Camera Work, the little magazine he established in 1903 to promote his avant-garde ideas and which he continued to publish until 1917.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | May 1, 2003
Alfred Stieglitz, the embattled genius who practically single-handedly dragged photography into the 20th century, was a tireless writer, publisher and gallery owner as well as a gifted photographer in his own right. Stieglitz wrote or edited hundreds of articles championing the artists he admired -- from photographers Edward Steichen and Paul Strand to painters Pablo Picasso and Henri Matisse to sculptor Auguste Rodin. Much of his criticism appeared in Camera Work, the little magazine he established in 1903 to promote his avant-garde ideas and which he continued to publish until 1917.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | April 16, 2001
Alfred Steiglitz almost single-handedly invented modern photography. Before Stieglitz, photography had been an amateur pastime, a commercial business and a sometime scientific tool. After him, it was an art as well. How that happened is the story told by "Alfred Stieglitz: The Eloquent Eye," the PBS "American Masters" series biography that airs tonight at 10 on channels 22 and 67. Stieglitz, born into a wealthy German-Jewish family in Hoboken, N.J., in 1864, was a phenomenon, a force of nature with a temperament as Napoleonic as his ego. He felt constantly embattled in the "fight" for photography's acceptance as art, which he waged with the relentless, take-no-prisoners determination of a military campaign.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | November 23, 1999
In an article Sunday about the African-American art exhibition at Washington's Corcoran Gallery, I remarked that historically black colleges and universities were among the first to collect the work of African-American artists.However, it's also true that these institutions had significant holdings of works by white American and European artists. In fact, works by early American modernists like Arthur Dove, Marsden Hartley, Alfred Stieglitz and Georgia O'Keeffe constitute an important part of these collections.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | February 25, 2001
Alfred Stieglitz, the man who, in his own opinion at least, singlehandedly dragged American art into the 20th century, loved to recall how he founded "291," the tiny New York gallery where he launched America's modernist revolution. As Stieglitz told it, Charles de Kay, the editor of Century magazine, approached him one day in 1902 about mounting a show of American photographers in New York. Stieglitz, already recognized as an innovative photographer and a leader in the fight for photography's status as a fine art, readily agreed.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | April 16, 2001
Alfred Steiglitz almost single-handedly invented modern photography. Before Stieglitz, photography had been an amateur pastime, a commercial business and a sometime scientific tool. After him, it was an art as well. How that happened is the story told by "Alfred Stieglitz: The Eloquent Eye," the PBS "American Masters" series biography that airs tonight at 10 on channels 22 and 67. Stieglitz, born into a wealthy German-Jewish family in Hoboken, N.J., in 1864, was a phenomenon, a force of nature with a temperament as Napoleonic as his ego. He felt constantly embattled in the "fight" for photography's acceptance as art, which he waged with the relentless, take-no-prisoners determination of a military campaign.
NEWS
By Stephen Margulies | June 2, 1991
O'KEEFFE AND STIEGLITZ:AN AMERICAN ROMANCE.Benita Eisler.Doubleday.494 pages. $29.50.Do we need to worship heroes? Do we need heroes at all? It is true that the hero-worship of the 19th century (knowingly created as a substitute for religion) not only resulted in Napoleon, Beethoven and Walt Whitman, but also perhaps in the homicidal clowns of the 20th century, like Mussolini. Where politicians fail, artists and poets like Picasso, Hemingway or Virginia Woolf are promoted to hero. Yet contemporary artist Jenny Holzer has rented heroic-size billboards to proclaim a different message: "We don't need another hero!"
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | August 3, 1997
To look at Georgia O'Keeffe 81 times through the lens of Alfred Stieglitz is to watch someone you thought you knew slowly become an enigma.Gone is the flinty-looking, aged icon of the Southwest, our image of O'Keeffe for decades before her death in 1986. In its place, Stieglitz gives us a much younger O'Keeffe, in photographs taken between 1917 and 1937. More important, the O'Keeffe he presents is not a single entity, but a prismatic, multifaceted presence.The 81 photographs are presented as a single work of art. Called "Georgia O'Keeffe: A Portrait by Alfred Stieglitz," it is on view at New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art.It stands as one of the most unusual portraits in all of art history, and more besides: It is also a drama of human emotion as revealed by the human body, a record of one of the century's great love affairs, a set of variations on early 20th-century modernism, and a successful collaboration by two of the era's most famous artists.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | January 31, 1993
Jan. 1, 1916, should be known as a significant date in the history of American art because it was an even more significant one in the lives of photographer Alfred Stieglitz and painter Georgia O'Keeffe. It was Stieglitz's 52nd birthday, but that was the least of it. It was also the day on which artist Anita Pollitzer brought a group of drawings by her friend Georgia O'Keeffe to show Stieglitz at his New York gallery called 291.Stieglitz was at a low point in his career and his life. Always most interested in promoting what he considered the best of contemporary art, in the early years of the 20th century he had introduced to America the work of Picasso, Braque, Cezanne and other leading European artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | February 25, 2001
Alfred Stieglitz, the man who, in his own opinion at least, singlehandedly dragged American art into the 20th century, loved to recall how he founded "291," the tiny New York gallery where he launched America's modernist revolution. As Stieglitz told it, Charles de Kay, the editor of Century magazine, approached him one day in 1902 about mounting a show of American photographers in New York. Stieglitz, already recognized as an innovative photographer and a leader in the fight for photography's status as a fine art, readily agreed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | December 3, 2000
NEW YORK -- It is 9:30 a.m. on what looks to be a fine fall day in the life of Susan Lacy, the 51-year-old creator and executive producer of the PBS TV series "American Masters." The sun is shining brightly on her first day back at work after a two-week vacation at Sag Harbor, Maine. She has the relaxed, almost serene, glow of someone who thoroughly enjoyed her holiday. There's a huge stack of folders and papers sitting on her desk, but they are flanked by a vase of spectacular lavender flowers and a shiny, gold Emmy statue recently awarded to "American Masters" as the Best Non-Fiction Series on television for the second straight year.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | November 23, 1999
In an article Sunday about the African-American art exhibition at Washington's Corcoran Gallery, I remarked that historically black colleges and universities were among the first to collect the work of African-American artists.However, it's also true that these institutions had significant holdings of works by white American and European artists. In fact, works by early American modernists like Arthur Dove, Marsden Hartley, Alfred Stieglitz and Georgia O'Keeffe constitute an important part of these collections.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | August 3, 1997
To look at Georgia O'Keeffe 81 times through the lens of Alfred Stieglitz is to watch someone you thought you knew slowly become an enigma.Gone is the flinty-looking, aged icon of the Southwest, our image of O'Keeffe for decades before her death in 1986. In its place, Stieglitz gives us a much younger O'Keeffe, in photographs taken between 1917 and 1937. More important, the O'Keeffe he presents is not a single entity, but a prismatic, multifaceted presence.The 81 photographs are presented as a single work of art. Called "Georgia O'Keeffe: A Portrait by Alfred Stieglitz," it is on view at New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art.It stands as one of the most unusual portraits in all of art history, and more besides: It is also a drama of human emotion as revealed by the human body, a record of one of the century's great love affairs, a set of variations on early 20th-century modernism, and a successful collaboration by two of the era's most famous artists.
NEWS
April 15, 1997
Michael Dorris,52, an adoptive parent of children with fetal alcohol syndrome and author of a prize-winning book on the subject, died Thursday or Friday in Concord, N.H., a family friend said.The Concord Monitor reported that Mr. Dorris was found Friday in a Concord motel room. Police said the death appeared to have been a suicide. The newspaper said he apparently suffocated himself using a plastic bag.Mr. Dorris won a National Book Critics Circle award in 1989 in the nonfiction category for "The Broken Cord," a first-person account of how fetal alcohol syndrome affected his eldest son, Abel, who died.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Sun Staff Writer | October 24, 1994
Like most people, I have my own particular memories of a first visit to Paris. I was 17, just out of high school and traveling through Europe with a group of 75 other teen-agers. When we hit Paris, my friends and I went straight to the cafes, where we tried to order red wine in carafes and smoke the impossibly foul Gaulois cigarettes. We didn't wear berets or black turtlenecks, but we were bohemians nonetheless.While on the Left Bank, we made frequent trips to the used-book stalls along the River Seine.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Sun Staff Writer | October 24, 1994
Like most people, I have my own particular memories of a first visit to Paris. I was 17, just out of high school and traveling through Europe with a group of 75 other teen-agers. When we hit Paris, my friends and I went straight to the cafes, where we tried to order red wine in carafes and smoke the impossibly foul Gaulois cigarettes. We didn't wear berets or black turtlenecks, but we were bohemians nonetheless.While on the Left Bank, we made frequent trips to the used-book stalls along the River Seine.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | December 3, 2000
NEW YORK -- It is 9:30 a.m. on what looks to be a fine fall day in the life of Susan Lacy, the 51-year-old creator and executive producer of the PBS TV series "American Masters." The sun is shining brightly on her first day back at work after a two-week vacation at Sag Harbor, Maine. She has the relaxed, almost serene, glow of someone who thoroughly enjoyed her holiday. There's a huge stack of folders and papers sitting on her desk, but they are flanked by a vase of spectacular lavender flowers and a shiny, gold Emmy statue recently awarded to "American Masters" as the Best Non-Fiction Series on television for the second straight year.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | January 31, 1993
Jan. 1, 1916, should be known as a significant date in the history of American art because it was an even more significant one in the lives of photographer Alfred Stieglitz and painter Georgia O'Keeffe. It was Stieglitz's 52nd birthday, but that was the least of it. It was also the day on which artist Anita Pollitzer brought a group of drawings by her friend Georgia O'Keeffe to show Stieglitz at his New York gallery called 291.Stieglitz was at a low point in his career and his life. Always most interested in promoting what he considered the best of contemporary art, in the early years of the 20th century he had introduced to America the work of Picasso, Braque, Cezanne and other leading European artists.
NEWS
By Stephen Margulies | June 2, 1991
O'KEEFFE AND STIEGLITZ:AN AMERICAN ROMANCE.Benita Eisler.Doubleday.494 pages. $29.50.Do we need to worship heroes? Do we need heroes at all? It is true that the hero-worship of the 19th century (knowingly created as a substitute for religion) not only resulted in Napoleon, Beethoven and Walt Whitman, but also perhaps in the homicidal clowns of the 20th century, like Mussolini. Where politicians fail, artists and poets like Picasso, Hemingway or Virginia Woolf are promoted to hero. Yet contemporary artist Jenny Holzer has rented heroic-size billboards to proclaim a different message: "We don't need another hero!"
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