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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN REPORTER | June 20, 2008
Baltimore's reigning best film series, the Charles Theatre's six-month Alfred Hitchcock retrospective, wraps this weekend with 1955's To Catch a Thief, starring Cary Grant as John Robie, a reformed cat burglar who's being framed for a bunch of high-society jewel thefts in Monaco. Grace Kelly, in the film that introduced her to the tiny kingdom that would soon call her queen, is the stunning socialite who can't help but fall for his charms, even if she's not sure he can be trusted. Showtime is noon tomorrow at the Charles, 1711 N. Charles St., with encore screenings set for 7 p.m. Monday and 9 p.m. Thursday.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2010
Folks impervious to the charms of vintage theater and film, immune to the allure of farce, or allergic to dry British wit and jolts of Monty Python-esque zaniness may find the fuss about "The 39 Steps" a puzzlement. Everyone else is apt to be swept along by the abundant humor and style of this ingenious show, which has settled into the Hippodrome for the last stop on a nearly year-long national tour. Taking as it starting point Alfred Hitchcock's clever 1935 film of the same name, "The 39 Steps," adapted by Patrick Barlow, adds up to more than homage.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | November 1, 1999
They were, actor Norman Lloyd recalls, "two sticks rubbing together to make fire."David O. Selznick was a producer at the top of his game, at a time in Hollywood when producing was the only game in town. As head of his own studio, he delighted in telling his directors what to do, operating on the spur of the moment and trusting his instincts, even if those instincts told him it was time to start from scratch.The result of that scattershot approach to moviemaking: "Gone With the Wind," a film that still stands as the crown jewel of the Golden Age of Hollywood.
NEWS
August 21, 2008
MANNY FARBER, 91 Painter, film critic Manny Farber, a painter whose spiky, impassioned film criticism waged war against sacred cows such as Orson Welles and elevated American genre-movie directors like Howard Hawks and Sam Fuller to the Hollywood pantheon, died Monday at his home in Leucadia, Calif. His death was confirmed by Jean-Pierre Gorin, a friend and colleague at the University of California at San Diego. Mr. Farber, a quirky prose stylist with a barbed lance, responded to film viscerally.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2000
"Dial M For Murder," which opens tonight at the Charles, may be the most understated 3-D film ever made. That's why watching it is such a delight. Legend has it that Alfred Hitchcock had little desire to work on the 1954 film adaptation of Frederick Knott's play, but ended up directing it because he had a contractual obligation to Warner Bros., and because it gave him another opportunity to work with his leading lady du jour, the luminous Grace Kelly. In fact, "Dial M" was filmed in 3-D only because studio boss Jack Warner was intrigued by the process -a momentary rage in the annals of film history -and figured it would bring in extra money.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,Sun Film Critic | March 12, 2000
I don't remember when I first saw "Rear Window." But clearly I was at a formative age. To this day, Alfred Hitchcock's film, which was released in 1954, remains for me an indelible, transfixing, endlessly fascinating exercise in the power of the cinema to seduce, coerce and just plain entertain. I can't tell you how many times I've seen "Rear Window," either. A dozen? Two dozen? It doesn't matter, because each time I see it, it's for the first time. Hitchcock packed so much expression and information into every single shot of the movie that it provides endlessly rewarding reading.
FEATURES
May 12, 2008
Hitchcock film series Go to the Alfred Hitchcock revival film series at the Charles Theatre, 1711 N. Charles St. Today's feature, Vertigo, will be shown at 7 p.m. Tickets are $8. Call 410-727-3456 or go to thecharles.com. FYI Edward Gunts is on assignment. His architecture column does not appear today.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey | October 7, 2004
Where: The Carroll Arts Center, 91 W. Main St., Westminster. When: Tomorrow. Doors open at 6:30 p.m., movie starts at 7 p.m. Why: There is no better device for a quick cuddle than a scary movie - particularly one directed by Alfred Hitchcock. If you can't make it to this week's film, they're showing Hitchcock's The Birds on Oct. 15, Vertigo on Oct. 22 and Psycho on Oct. 29. Information: Call 410-848-7272.
NEWS
August 25, 1994
Joan Harrison,83, who wrote "Rebecca" and "Foreign Correspondent" for Alfred Hitchcock, died Aug. 14 in London. She went to work for Mr. Hitchcock as a secretary in London in 1933 and accompanied the director to Hollywood in 1939. She became one of the first female film producers and produced TV's "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" for its entire run. Her adaption of Daphne du Maurier's novel, "Rebecca," starred Sir Laurence Olivier and Joan Fontaine. The film won the Academy Award for best picture of 1940.
NEWS
September 17, 1997
Elisabeth Brooks, 46, an actress seen on television shows such as "The Rockford Files" and "Hart to Hart" but perhaps best-remembered as the villainess in "The Howling," died of cancer Sept. 7 in Palm Springs, Calif.Roger Frey, 84, a close aide to Gen. Charles de Gaulle who as interior minister crushed a revolt by French settlers opposed to Algerian independence, died Saturday in Paris of a stroke.Will Hare, 81, a founding member of the Actors Studio who appeared on Broadway, in television and in movies over a four-decade career, died of a heart attack Aug. 31 in New York.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN REPORTER | June 20, 2008
Baltimore's reigning best film series, the Charles Theatre's six-month Alfred Hitchcock retrospective, wraps this weekend with 1955's To Catch a Thief, starring Cary Grant as John Robie, a reformed cat burglar who's being framed for a bunch of high-society jewel thefts in Monaco. Grace Kelly, in the film that introduced her to the tiny kingdom that would soon call her queen, is the stunning socialite who can't help but fall for his charms, even if she's not sure he can be trusted. Showtime is noon tomorrow at the Charles, 1711 N. Charles St., with encore screenings set for 7 p.m. Monday and 9 p.m. Thursday.
FEATURES
May 12, 2008
Hitchcock film series Go to the Alfred Hitchcock revival film series at the Charles Theatre, 1711 N. Charles St. Today's feature, Vertigo, will be shown at 7 p.m. Tickets are $8. Call 410-727-3456 or go to thecharles.com. FYI Edward Gunts is on assignment. His architecture column does not appear today.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | December 30, 2007
Ask average moviegoers about Howard Hawks, William Wyler or George Cukor, and you'll probably get nothing but blank stares. Try Billy Wilder or John Ford, and you might elicit a glimmer of recognition, although they probably couldn't name a single film either man directed. But mention Alfred Hitchcock, and it's like bringing up the name of a good friend. Everybody knows Hitchcock, the overweight gentleman with the pronounced English drawl. He's the guy who directed Psycho, right? Plus The Birds, Rear Window and the movie with that guy being chased across a cornfield by an airplane.
ENTERTAINMENT
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 13, 2005
The Interpreter [Universal] $30 Oscar-winning director Sydney Pollack scored box-office gold with the thrillers Three Days of the Condor (1975) and The Firm (1993). But his latest journey into the genre fails to ignite even with the presence of Oscar winners Nicole Kidman and Sean Penn. Extras are worthwhile, including a powerful alternate ending and discussions with the erudite Pollack on pan-and-scan versus widescreen and his editing techniques. Alfred Hitchcock Masterpiece Collection [Universal]
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | October 2, 2005
A collection from the 'Master of Suspense' HITCHCOCK: THE MASTERPIECE COLLECTION / / UNIVERSAL / $119.98 / ALFRED HITCHCOCK PRESENTS: SEASON ONE / / UNIVERSAL / $39.98 / Hitchcock-apalooza hits video stores Tuesday with the release of an indispensable boxed set from the justly named "Master of Suspense," along with the first season of the television show that helped make him a household name -- one of those fortuitous happenstances where fame and...
NEWS
October 22, 2004
Alfred Hitchcock's `Vertigo' to be shown at arts center The Carroll County Arts Councilwill screen Alfred Hitchcock's film Vertigo at 7 p.m. today on the big screen at the Carroll Arts Center. The PG-rated film from 1958 focuses on a retired police detective played by James Stewart who must overcome vertigo and his obsession with a friend's wife, played by Kim Novak. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. at 91 W. Main St., Westminster. Tickets are $5 for adults, and $4 for Arts Council members, seniors 60 and older and children 12 and younger.
NEWS
August 21, 2008
MANNY FARBER, 91 Painter, film critic Manny Farber, a painter whose spiky, impassioned film criticism waged war against sacred cows such as Orson Welles and elevated American genre-movie directors like Howard Hawks and Sam Fuller to the Hollywood pantheon, died Monday at his home in Leucadia, Calif. His death was confirmed by Jean-Pierre Gorin, a friend and colleague at the University of California at San Diego. Mr. Farber, a quirky prose stylist with a barbed lance, responded to film viscerally.
NEWS
By Katie Martin and Katie Martin,SUN STAFF | October 8, 2004
When Alfred Hitchcock's most famous thrillers were originally released in the 1950s and 1960s, an audience would have watched the suspense unfold at the Carroll Theatre on Main Street in Westminster. This month, classic Hitchcock films will again be shown at the theater, now the renovated Carroll Arts Center, as part of an Alfred Hitchcock Film Festival. "The series brings back an era of when this theater was hoppin'," said Sandy Oxx, executive director of the Carroll County Arts Council.
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