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By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 25, 1997
Vivien T. Thomas, who was born in New Iberia, La., and raised in Nashville, Tenn., had hoped one day to become a surgeon. A bank failure during the early days of the Great Depression wiped away his medical-school savings and nearly his dream.The son of a contractor, Thomas was so impressed as a youth by his family's physician that he pledged to "be like him." He had scraped together the money for his medical education by working after school and as an orderly in a private infirmary.In 1929, Thomas enrolled in a premedical course at the Tennessee Agricultural and Industrial College and, after losing his money in the stock market crash, went to work in 1930 for Dr. Alfred Blalock at Vanderbilt University, who eventually trained him to be his surgical assistant.
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NEWS
April 20, 2012
Thanks to last week's news coverage, many have heard of the new Sheikh Zayed and Charlotte R. Bloomberg Center at Johns Hopkins Hospital, but there is another building at Hopkins that remains largely unknown: the Blalock Clinical Science Building. Two years ago, I watched the PBS documentary, "Partners of the Heart" during a tour of Johns Hopkins with a small group of students. It showed how two men, Alfred Blalock and Vivien Thomas, equally contributed to help save the lives of 170,000 children suffering from blue baby syndrome.
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NEWS
April 14, 1992
Elizabeth Blalock Blackford, who had been a teacher in Virginia and West Virginia and a resident of the Baltimore area since the early 1930s, died April 6 of heart failure at Church Hospital. She was 86.Mrs. Blackford, who lived on Weatherbee Road in Towson, taught chemistry at schools in Alexandria, Va., and Salem, W.Va., before her marriage to Chester Blackford. Mr. Blackford retired as a central office engineer for the Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. before his death in 1977.The former Elizabeth Blalock was a native of Culloden, Ga. She was reared in Jonesboro, Ga., and was a 1925 graduate of Agnes Scott College in Atlanta.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 18, 2004
With The Tuskegee Airmen (1995) and Miss Evers' Boys (1997), HBO has chronicled the African-American experience better than anyone else in the made-for-TV movie business. And now comes Something the Lord Made, a new HBO film about a white surgeon and a black lab technician who together pioneered heart surgery in the 1940s at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Beyond one significant inaccuracy, the film that premieres locally tonight at the Senator Theatre is made of the same stuff as the very best HBO movies.
NEWS
By James H. Bready | January 26, 1992
The name Machen spans three generations of the practice of law in Baltimore -- Arthur W. Machen, each time. What will distinguish the third, present-day Machen is his additional literary standing, as the author of "A Venerable Assembly: The History of Venable, Baetjer and Howard, 1901-1991." VBH is one of this city's three or four legal powerhouses; as of last September, it had 667 employees, 124 of them partners, at a half-dozen locations.Mr. Machen himself, emerging from nearly 40 years as a VBH partner, somehow does not speak in legalese.
NEWS
April 20, 2012
Thanks to last week's news coverage, many have heard of the new Sheikh Zayed and Charlotte R. Bloomberg Center at Johns Hopkins Hospital, but there is another building at Hopkins that remains largely unknown: the Blalock Clinical Science Building. Two years ago, I watched the PBS documentary, "Partners of the Heart" during a tour of Johns Hopkins with a small group of students. It showed how two men, Alfred Blalock and Vivien Thomas, equally contributed to help save the lives of 170,000 children suffering from blue baby syndrome.
NEWS
By ROZ HAMLETT | November 4, 1993
That Vivien Thomas, a black man with neither a college nor a medical degree, could have worked as a research assistant at Hopkins Hospital during the 1940s was in itself something of a minor miracle. In that era of strict racial segregation, the only black men who worked at the hospital were pushing brooms and mops. Not only were there no black doctors at Hopkins, there were no black professionals of any kind.The hospital wards and waiting rooms were designated ''white'' and ''colored'' -- even the blood bank carefully separated blood donated by whites from blood donated by blacks.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 10, 2003
Partners of the Heart, an eloquent and moving PBS documentary on a pioneering medical research team at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, opens with a striking scene. The setting is an old-fashioned operating room (circa 1944). A row of nurses and doctors garbed in white gowns and masks surrounds the operating table. A surgeon is working intently on an anesthetized child. But behind the surgeon, standing on some kind of raised platform, there's another man in a white gown whispering in the surgeon's ear. As the camera closes in on the tableau, it can be seen that the surgeon is white and the man behind him is black.
FEATURES
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN STAFF | December 17, 2003
Was that Mos Def who just walked by? Could have been. The rapper, Broadway star and film actor is in Baltimore for the shooting of an HBO movie about a Johns Hopkins doctor and his lab assistant. Titled Something the Lord Made, the film is based on the 35-year professional relationship and friendship between cardiologist Alfred Blalock (played by Alan Rickman) and his research assistant, Vivien Thomas (played by Mos Def). The men, who died in 1964 and 1985 respectively, together developed a method to save oxygen-deprived "blue babies."
NEWS
April 14, 1992
Charles R. BardoffRetired salesmanServices for Charles R. Bardoff, a retired wholesale appliance and advertising salesman who had helped operate a family hardware business in Hampden, will be held at 1 p.m. today at the Danzansky-Goldberg Memorial Chapels in Rockville.Mr. Bardoff, a Baltimore native, died Sunday of emphysema at his home in Silver Spring. He was 64.He retired about one year ago as a salesman for the Zamoiski Co., where he had returned to work in the late 1980s. He had been on that company's sales staff from the late 1950s until the mid-1970s.
FEATURES
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN STAFF | December 17, 2003
Was that Mos Def who just walked by? Could have been. The rapper, Broadway star and film actor is in Baltimore for the shooting of an HBO movie about a Johns Hopkins doctor and his lab assistant. Titled Something the Lord Made, the film is based on the 35-year professional relationship and friendship between cardiologist Alfred Blalock (played by Alan Rickman) and his research assistant, Vivien Thomas (played by Mos Def). The men, who died in 1964 and 1985 respectively, together developed a method to save oxygen-deprived "blue babies."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 10, 2003
Partners of the Heart, an eloquent and moving PBS documentary on a pioneering medical research team at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, opens with a striking scene. The setting is an old-fashioned operating room (circa 1944). A row of nurses and doctors garbed in white gowns and masks surrounds the operating table. A surgeon is working intently on an anesthetized child. But behind the surgeon, standing on some kind of raised platform, there's another man in a white gown whispering in the surgeon's ear. As the camera closes in on the tableau, it can be seen that the surgeon is white and the man behind him is black.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2001
One man was a black carpenter's apprentice with little more than a high school diploma. The other was a white surgeon who in the 1940s became one of the most famous medical pioneers in the world. Yet Johns Hopkins Hospital surgeon Alfred Blalock - who helped develop the "blue baby" operation - and his lab technician, Vivien Thomas, would forge one of the most unusual and productive partnerships in 20th-century medicine. A Washington film company plans to introduce this little-known story to a nationwide audience in a new PBS documentary.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 25, 1997
Vivien T. Thomas, who was born in New Iberia, La., and raised in Nashville, Tenn., had hoped one day to become a surgeon. A bank failure during the early days of the Great Depression wiped away his medical-school savings and nearly his dream.The son of a contractor, Thomas was so impressed as a youth by his family's physician that he pledged to "be like him." He had scraped together the money for his medical education by working after school and as an orderly in a private infirmary.In 1929, Thomas enrolled in a premedical course at the Tennessee Agricultural and Industrial College and, after losing his money in the stock market crash, went to work in 1930 for Dr. Alfred Blalock at Vanderbilt University, who eventually trained him to be his surgical assistant.
NEWS
By ROZ HAMLETT | November 4, 1993
That Vivien Thomas, a black man with neither a college nor a medical degree, could have worked as a research assistant at Hopkins Hospital during the 1940s was in itself something of a minor miracle. In that era of strict racial segregation, the only black men who worked at the hospital were pushing brooms and mops. Not only were there no black doctors at Hopkins, there were no black professionals of any kind.The hospital wards and waiting rooms were designated ''white'' and ''colored'' -- even the blood bank carefully separated blood donated by whites from blood donated by blacks.
NEWS
April 14, 1992
Charles R. BardoffRetired salesmanServices for Charles R. Bardoff, a retired wholesale appliance and advertising salesman who had helped operate a family hardware business in Hampden, will be held at 1 p.m. today at the Danzansky-Goldberg Memorial Chapels in Rockville.Mr. Bardoff, a Baltimore native, died Sunday of emphysema at his home in Silver Spring. He was 64.He retired about one year ago as a salesman for the Zamoiski Co., where he had returned to work in the late 1980s. He had been on that company's sales staff from the late 1950s until the mid-1970s.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2001
One man was a black carpenter's apprentice with little more than a high school diploma. The other was a white surgeon who in the 1940s became one of the most famous medical pioneers in the world. Yet Johns Hopkins Hospital surgeon Alfred Blalock - who helped develop the "blue baby" operation - and his lab technician, Vivien Thomas, would forge one of the most unusual and productive partnerships in 20th-century medicine. A Washington film company plans to introduce this little-known story to a nationwide audience in a new PBS documentary.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 18, 2004
With The Tuskegee Airmen (1995) and Miss Evers' Boys (1997), HBO has chronicled the African-American experience better than anyone else in the made-for-TV movie business. And now comes Something the Lord Made, a new HBO film about a white surgeon and a black lab technician who together pioneered heart surgery in the 1940s at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Beyond one significant inaccuracy, the film that premieres locally tonight at the Senator Theatre is made of the same stuff as the very best HBO movies.
NEWS
April 14, 1992
Elizabeth Blalock Blackford, who had been a teacher in Virginia and West Virginia and a resident of the Baltimore area since the early 1930s, died April 6 of heart failure at Church Hospital. She was 86.Mrs. Blackford, who lived on Weatherbee Road in Towson, taught chemistry at schools in Alexandria, Va., and Salem, W.Va., before her marriage to Chester Blackford. Mr. Blackford retired as a central office engineer for the Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. before his death in 1977.The former Elizabeth Blalock was a native of Culloden, Ga. She was reared in Jonesboro, Ga., and was a 1925 graduate of Agnes Scott College in Atlanta.
NEWS
By James H. Bready | January 26, 1992
The name Machen spans three generations of the practice of law in Baltimore -- Arthur W. Machen, each time. What will distinguish the third, present-day Machen is his additional literary standing, as the author of "A Venerable Assembly: The History of Venable, Baetjer and Howard, 1901-1991." VBH is one of this city's three or four legal powerhouses; as of last September, it had 667 employees, 124 of them partners, at a half-dozen locations.Mr. Machen himself, emerging from nearly 40 years as a VBH partner, somehow does not speak in legalese.
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