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By Ryan Murphy and Ryan Murphy,Knight-Ridder News Service | January 26, 1992
Alfre Woodard is an actress known for gritty performances in such projects as HBO's "Mandela" (where she played Winnie, wife of Nelson), the 1984 film "Cross Creek" (where she nabbed her first Oscar nomination), and on dramatic television series such as "St. Elsewhere" and "L.A. Law." Surprisingly, for all the serious turns and resulting awards (she's won several Emmys, an ACE Award and several theater accolades), Ms. Woodard says the part closest to her came in the film "Miss Firecracker," in which she played a seamstress named Popeye who could talk out of her eyeballs.
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SPORTS
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2013
Ray Lewis fever is clearly spreading beyond Baltimore! On the red carpet at Sunday's SAG Awards, Mario Lopez from "Extra" asked arriving celebs if they could do the Ray Lewis dance. Several tried, including Rico Rodriguez ("Modern Family") and Jim Parsons ("The Big Bang Theory"). But perhaps no one looked better than Alfre Woodard, who refused to even try. Clearly, Ray, there's room for you in Hollywood after the Super Bowl. Thanks, Extra.
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SPORTS
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2013
Ray Lewis fever is clearly spreading beyond Baltimore! On the red carpet at Sunday's SAG Awards, Mario Lopez from "Extra" asked arriving celebs if they could do the Ray Lewis dance. Several tried, including Rico Rodriguez ("Modern Family") and Jim Parsons ("The Big Bang Theory"). But perhaps no one looked better than Alfre Woodard, who refused to even try. Clearly, Ray, there's room for you in Hollywood after the Super Bowl. Thanks, Extra.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2011
As a member of the hit girl-group Destiny's Child, Michelle Williams had a backup role to frontwoman Beyonce. But as an actress, Williams has found herself playing the leading lady. With stints in Broadway plays such as "Aida," "The Color Purple" and "Chicago," Williams is quickly establishing herself as a seasoned thespian. Williams' latest role, in the play "What My Husband Doesn't Know," is Lena Summer, a married woman who struggles with fidelity. Williams talked about her longtime love of acting, her future projects in music and on stage, and about Beyonce's pregnancy.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | July 30, 1997
Alfre Woodard and Anna Paquin (a Best Supporting Actress Oscar-winner for "The Piano") shine in one of USA's best made-for-cable movies to date, an adaptation of Carson McCullers' novel "Member of the Wedding" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., USA).The story pits Paquin's character, a 12-year-old Georgia girl, against the world she's been brought up in. The girl can't decide whether she's a beauty (as her family suggests) or a freak who belongs in a circus. When her brother gets married, she decides the only thing to do is get out of town by leaving with him on his honeymoon, an idea that meets with a predictably cool reception.
FEATURES
By Kevin Thomas and Kevin Thomas,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 20, 2002
SUN SCORE *** In a splendid animated transition from the Nickelodeon cable channel to the big screen, The Wild Thornberrys makes a witty and delightful Christmas present for the entire family. The inspired adventures of 12-year-old animal lover Eliza Thornberry (voice of Lacey Chabert) transpire largely on Africa's Serengeti plain, which unfolds in all its unspoiled magnificence like a series of vast and beautiful murals, luminous in their richly shaded hues and subtle play of light and shadow.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | June 12, 1992
Anybody have a title for John Sayles?The film maker responsible for works including "City of Hope," "Eight Men Out," "Matewan" and "The Return of the Secaucus Seven" is in the editing room these days, working on something he calls "the Louisiana project."But that's not the film's title. "I just never came up with one that I like," he said. "We have had contests among cast and crew and among local people down in Acadiana," he said, referring to the area of Louisiana where he shot the film.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | January 17, 1992
DIRECTOR-writer Lawrence Kasdan is maturing. His newest film, ''Grand Canyon,'' is proof of that. When he did ''The Big Chill,'' he was 34 and still basking in the afterglow of the '60s.In the eight years since then, he has become more aware of the larger society, and in this instance, he does not like what he sees.He is not making comment on American society. He is simply observing it, and in the end, he offers some hope that we can make our way out of this mess.It's a long film, but then what film today is not?
FEATURES
By ANN HORNADAY and ANN HORNADAY,SUN FILM CRITIC | May 19, 2000
According to production information, "Dinosaur" took five years to make, not to mention 3.2 million processing hours, 45 terabytes of disc space, 250 computer processors and 70,000 lines of code. According to rumor, it also cost $200 million to produce. The question before us is whether it was worth it. A lifeless, warmed-over story meant to overcome its limitations with eye-catching special effects, "Dinosaur" falls into a limbo that so many animated features seem to occupy these days, the nether world between a children's movie and a full-blown adult action adventure.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck MOVIES Sayles' willful women | February 20, 1993
THEATERMusical theater debutsLocal director/choreographer Todd Pearthree has chosen Stephen Sondheim and James Lapine's challenging fairy-tale musical, "Into the Woods," to launch his new company, the Musical Theatre Machine; it's difficult to imagine a more auspicious debut. The show examines what happens after happily-ever-after, and this clever production will convince you fairy tales can come true. MTM is in residence at the Spotlighters Theatre, 817 St. Paul St. Weekend show times are today at 8 p.m. and tomorrow at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Tickets are $14. Call (410)
NEWS
September 26, 2008
Lakeview Terrace * 1/2 ( 1 1/2 STARS) $15 million $15 million 1 week Rated: PG-13 Running time: 110 minutes What it's about: An interracial couple (Patrick Wilson and Kerry Washington) move to an L.A. suburb and almost immediately suspect their neighbor, a veteran black cop (Samuel L. Jackson, above), of plotting to drive them out of the neighborhood. Our take: It's one more failed thriller about men behaving badly - and stupidly. Burn After Reading ** 1/2 ( 2 1/2 STARS) $11 million $36.1 million 2 weeks Rated: R Running time: 96 minutes What it's about: Espionage gets mixed up with a gym worker's desire to get a Hollywood body, a CIA wife's move to get a divorce, and a U.S. Treasury agent's propensity to get some thrills.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2008
Boy A What it's about: A young man released after a lengthy prison term for an atrocious crime committed in his childhood adjusts to society with the help of a new name and manufactured background. Rated: R The scoop: The movie turns clinical whenever it flashes back to the antihero's childhood, but Andrew Garfield (above) gives a genius lead performance filled with terror and wonder. Grade: *** ( 3 STARS) Brick Lane What it's about: A Bangladeshi woman (Tannishtha Chatterjee, above)
NEWS
By TANIKA WHITE and TANIKA WHITE,SUN REPORTER | June 4, 2006
The day a bad relaxer product burned unsightly bald patches into Kym Williams' hair seemed to her at the time to be the end of the world. But it actually turned out to be the beginning of a new life. After the chemicals burned her hair and scalp seven years ago, Williams -- now the author of a new book, The Art of Wig Design -- went on a fruitless quest for a stylish, natural-looking wig to cover her suddenly patchy head. "I was in a state of depression. It was horrible. My self-esteem was gone," says Williams, 38. "And I couldn't find a wig that looked natural anywhere.
FEATURES
By Jan Stuart and Jan Stuart,NEWSDAY | October 24, 2003
Earlier in the month, an Iranian human rights activist was glorified by the Nobel Peace Prize committee, while just this week Mother Teresa was beatified by the pope. Hollywood, not to be outdone, has canonized a white football coach who took it upon himself to be nice to a young black man of limited intellectual capacity. The coach's beneficence was doubly worthy of a major motion picture, we are to infer, because the events transpired in a South Carolina village at a time (early '70s)
FEATURES
By Kevin Thomas and Kevin Thomas,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 20, 2002
SUN SCORE *** In a splendid animated transition from the Nickelodeon cable channel to the big screen, The Wild Thornberrys makes a witty and delightful Christmas present for the entire family. The inspired adventures of 12-year-old animal lover Eliza Thornberry (voice of Lacey Chabert) transpire largely on Africa's Serengeti plain, which unfolds in all its unspoiled magnificence like a series of vast and beautiful murals, luminous in their richly shaded hues and subtle play of light and shadow.
FEATURES
By ANN HORNADAY and ANN HORNADAY,SUN FILM CRITIC | May 19, 2000
According to production information, "Dinosaur" took five years to make, not to mention 3.2 million processing hours, 45 terabytes of disc space, 250 computer processors and 70,000 lines of code. According to rumor, it also cost $200 million to produce. The question before us is whether it was worth it. A lifeless, warmed-over story meant to overcome its limitations with eye-catching special effects, "Dinosaur" falls into a limbo that so many animated features seem to occupy these days, the nether world between a children's movie and a full-blown adult action adventure.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | August 13, 1993
"Heart and Souls"Starring Robert Downey Jr., Charles Grodin and Alfre WoodardDirected by Ron UnderwoodReleased by UniversalRated PG-13** 1/25/8 There are some great movie moments in "Heart and Souls," but not enough of them to matter. This is another one of those epiphany machines that's calculated to grind on gears so fine they con your eyes and sinuses into producing copious amounts of fluid. You're not supposed to walk out of the theater so much as surf out, on a banzai pipeline of mucus, fake grief and cheesy triumph.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2011
As a member of the hit girl-group Destiny's Child, Michelle Williams had a backup role to frontwoman Beyonce. But as an actress, Williams has found herself playing the leading lady. With stints in Broadway plays such as "Aida," "The Color Purple" and "Chicago," Williams is quickly establishing herself as a seasoned thespian. Williams' latest role, in the play "What My Husband Doesn't Know," is Lena Summer, a married woman who struggles with fidelity. Williams talked about her longtime love of acting, her future projects in music and on stage, and about Beyonce's pregnancy.
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