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NEWS
July 27, 1997
Alfalfa growers can damage their crops by trying to save money on leaf-hopper control and by delaying cutting on short alfalfa, according to University of Maryland researchers.Severe leaf hopper damage in the form of yellowing and stunted plants can reduce crop yield for as many as five subsequent cuttings, said Les Vouch, extension forage specialist.Vouch recommends that growers treat leaf hoppers to affect the maximum residual control, with 21 days being the optimum.He also suggests cutting alfalfa every 30 to 33 days, even if there is not enough to bale.
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NEWS
September 18, 2005
Crop insurance programs signup deadline is Sept. 30 The Carroll County Farm Service Agency in Westminster reminds producers that Sept. 30 is the deadline for signing up for two programs. They are: Crop insurance for wheat barley and oats. Current small grains policyholders must make any changes to their coverage. Price elections, per bushel, for the 2006 crops are wheat, $2.80; barley, $1.85; and oats, $1.33. Crop insurance on forage production. Changes to the current policy must be made to existing contracts.
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NEWS
September 18, 2005
Crop insurance programs signup deadline is Sept. 30 The Carroll County Farm Service Agency in Westminster reminds producers that Sept. 30 is the deadline for signing up for two programs. They are: Crop insurance for wheat barley and oats. Current small grains policyholders must make any changes to their coverage. Price elections, per bushel, for the 2006 crops are wheat, $2.80; barley, $1.85; and oats, $1.33. Crop insurance on forage production. Changes to the current policy must be made to existing contracts.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | February 28, 2000
The hundred buyers and the hundred sellers eyed each other. Auctioneer Nevin Tasto, microphone at the ready, stood between them and literally bales of merchandise -- bales of fragrant hay in shades of green and gold auctioned in Westminster every Tuesday. "Thirty dollars! Thirty dollars!" Tasto said, standing next to a giant roll of orchard grass, which was the first offering of the day at the longest-running event of its kind in Maryland. No one in the crowd responded with a nod or a tilt of the head.
NEWS
September 27, 1993
Manchester Town Council donates 1,000 bales of alfalfa to Midwest reliefThe Manchester Town Council is donating up to 1,000 bales of alfalfa grown at the town's sewage spray fields to the Midwest flood relief effort, provided that the town doesn't have to transport the hay to its recipients.The council voted 3-0 last week to donate the truckload of hay, at the suggestion of Mayor Earl A. J. "Tim" Warehime Jr.Alfalfa and reed canary grass grown at the spray fields usually are sold to raise money for the town's coffers.
NEWS
September 29, 1993
Manchester alfalfa heading to MidwestOne of Carroll County's first contributions to flood victims in Hancock County, Ill., will be a truckload of alfalfa from Manchester, Micki Smith, deputy director of administrative services, said yesterday.The alfalfa was grown on land irrigated by Manchester's sewage-treatment plant.County public works employee Patrick Hill is working with a local trucking company to send the crop to Hancock County so it can be used to feed farm animals.County employees have formed a Carroll Community Flood Relief Fund to collect money and supplies for the Illinois county, which lies at the confluence of the Des Moines and Mississippi rivers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jay Boyar and Jay Boyar,Orlando Sentinel | August 5, 1994
Not all movie history requires commemoration and reclamation.Producer Hal Roach's "Little Rascals" comedies of the '20s, '30s and '40s are, for example, best left unsung. Flat, repetitive and (by today's standards) politically incorrect, these moldy short subjects (also known collectively as the "Our Gang" series) feature a motley crew of kids who play endless silly tricks on one another.Buster Keaton, they aren't.Just why Universal Pictures has decided to revive the antique kiddie concept as a feature film is even more of a mystery than why "Lassie" and "Black Beauty" recently have been resuscitated.
NEWS
August 19, 1997
FireSykesville: Firefighters responded at 12: 07 p.m. Sunday to a fire alarm in the 2000 block of Alfalfa Court. Units were out 21 minutes.Gamber: Firefighters from Reese assisted Gamber at 7: 37 p.m. Saturday, responding to a tree fire in the 3300 block of Old Gamber Road. Units were out 20 minutes.PoliceSykesville: An employee of Foundations Unlimited Inc. of Woodbine told police a company pickup truck was stolen from outside his home on W. Old Liberty Road early Sunday. The loss was estimated at $15,060.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | October 9, 1994
Havre de Grace. -- October is a magical time, the afternoon light combining summer softness and winter clarity, but as it is so clearly the almost-end of so many things it has a poignancy as well, a bittersweet quality that tugs at your heart.Migrating robins are passing through, and hawks are on the move. As I walk up along the fenceline young bluebirds, fledged in the boxes I keep up around the farm, swirl ahead of me. They're insect-eaters, mostly, yet generally try to winter here. If it's a hard winter, many will die, cozy boxes to roost in or not.Along the fence line I walk in near-shadow, slowly and a little bent over, looking through the wild cherries and rosebushes at the alfalfa field on the other side.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Barry Koltnow and Barry Koltnow,Orange County Register | August 5, 1994
Director Penelope Spheeris, who had to deal with punk rockers in one of her documentaries and hard rockers in the popular movie "Wayne's World," confessed that she wasn't quite prepared for the task of directing very young children in "The Little Rascals," which opens today."
NEWS
August 19, 1997
FireSykesville: Firefighters responded at 12: 07 p.m. Sunday to a fire alarm in the 2000 block of Alfalfa Court. Units were out 21 minutes.Gamber: Firefighters from Reese assisted Gamber at 7: 37 p.m. Saturday, responding to a tree fire in the 3300 block of Old Gamber Road. Units were out 20 minutes.PoliceSykesville: An employee of Foundations Unlimited Inc. of Woodbine told police a company pickup truck was stolen from outside his home on W. Old Liberty Road early Sunday. The loss was estimated at $15,060.
NEWS
July 27, 1997
Alfalfa growers can damage their crops by trying to save money on leaf-hopper control and by delaying cutting on short alfalfa, according to University of Maryland researchers.Severe leaf hopper damage in the form of yellowing and stunted plants can reduce crop yield for as many as five subsequent cuttings, said Les Vouch, extension forage specialist.Vouch recommends that growers treat leaf hoppers to affect the maximum residual control, with 21 days being the optimum.He also suggests cutting alfalfa every 30 to 33 days, even if there is not enough to bale.
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | June 29, 1997
HAVRE DE GRACE -- At last the usual June miasma inevitably descends, bringing with it bad air from Baltimore and dire health warnings from Washington. And residents of our afflicted region, no doubt including the celebrated cop-killer and litigant Flint Gregory Hunt, are wondering if each breath they suck in may be their last.I found myself considering these and related subjects the other day as I baled some unusually nice alfalfa hay in the smoggy haze, and tried to see if I could check the pollution content in the air with the most sophisticated instrument I had available, my nose.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | March 30, 1997
MONMOUTH JUNCTION, N.J. - A New Jersey company, Phytotech of Monmouth Junction, is a leader in the emerging field of using plants to remove toxic substances from the soil.Phytotech was founded four years ago by Rutgers University researchers. It is one of only a handful of companies in the United States getting commercial contracts for phytoremediation.Last year, in a test of the new approach to cleansing polluted land, Phytotech got nearly 45 percent of the excess lead out of a seriously contaminated yard in Boston by sowing and harvesting a special strain of metal-absorbing greens that comes from India.
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | June 2, 1996
HAVRE de GRACE -- So close that it almost hits the windshield, a brown thrasher crosses in front of the car and vanishes through a gap in a roadside hedgerow. From deep green shadow to bright sun and back into shadow again, its passage has lasted only a second or two.Brown thrashers, related to catbirds and mockingbirds, are commonplace enough. But for some reason this one engages my full attention, and my brain makes one of those instant inexplicable connections that sometimes link present and past.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | October 9, 1994
Havre de Grace. -- October is a magical time, the afternoon light combining summer softness and winter clarity, but as it is so clearly the almost-end of so many things it has a poignancy as well, a bittersweet quality that tugs at your heart.Migrating robins are passing through, and hawks are on the move. As I walk up along the fenceline young bluebirds, fledged in the boxes I keep up around the farm, swirl ahead of me. They're insect-eaters, mostly, yet generally try to winter here. If it's a hard winter, many will die, cozy boxes to roost in or not.Along the fence line I walk in near-shadow, slowly and a little bent over, looking through the wild cherries and rosebushes at the alfalfa field on the other side.
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | June 29, 1997
HAVRE DE GRACE -- At last the usual June miasma inevitably descends, bringing with it bad air from Baltimore and dire health warnings from Washington. And residents of our afflicted region, no doubt including the celebrated cop-killer and litigant Flint Gregory Hunt, are wondering if each breath they suck in may be their last.I found myself considering these and related subjects the other day as I baled some unusually nice alfalfa hay in the smoggy haze, and tried to see if I could check the pollution content in the air with the most sophisticated instrument I had available, my nose.
NEWS
March 8, 1991
The Dust Bowl is an enduring image of pain for the families which fled west to escape during the Great Depression. It rises anew with the drought now choking Western states.Most of the focus is on California, whose population has zoomed to almost 30 million and whose farmers produce half the nation's vegetables. The worst dust pockets, however, are in Wyoming, Idaho and the valleys of Washington and Oregon east of the Cascade Mountains.Southern California, with its 15 million people, has plans to get more water from Colorado River reservoirs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Barry Koltnow and Barry Koltnow,Orange County Register | August 5, 1994
Director Penelope Spheeris, who had to deal with punk rockers in one of her documentaries and hard rockers in the popular movie "Wayne's World," confessed that she wasn't quite prepared for the task of directing very young children in "The Little Rascals," which opens today."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jay Boyar and Jay Boyar,Orlando Sentinel | August 5, 1994
Not all movie history requires commemoration and reclamation.Producer Hal Roach's "Little Rascals" comedies of the '20s, '30s and '40s are, for example, best left unsung. Flat, repetitive and (by today's standards) politically incorrect, these moldy short subjects (also known collectively as the "Our Gang" series) feature a motley crew of kids who play endless silly tricks on one another.Buster Keaton, they aren't.Just why Universal Pictures has decided to revive the antique kiddie concept as a feature film is even more of a mystery than why "Lassie" and "Black Beauty" recently have been resuscitated.
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