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By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 2, 1997
It's a tough gig, getting up in knee breeches, a frock coat and a white stock in front of a couple of dozen 10th-graders and condensing a book of more than 700 pages, "Democracy in America," into one or two ideas that the students can take home.Timothy Lynch, a 25-year-old graduate student from England, has been impersonating the book's author, Alexis de Tocqueville, since May. He's the live entertainment on a C-SPAN bus that's retracing the journey of the 19th-century French historian and sociologist, who toured the young United States in 1831 and 1832 in an attempt to comprehend democracy in action.
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NEWS
May 31, 2014
The opening of the Edgar Allan Poe House at 30 Amity Street was a small milestone in preserving important historical realities of Baltimore City. This opening also represented a significant achievement by a small number of citizens who realized that cooperative nonprofit action can serve a constructive purpose. It is interesting to note that the French sociologist Alexis de Tocqueville, in his work "Democracy in America," in the 1830s noted that Americans "are forever forming associations.
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NEWS
BY A STAFF WRITER | November 4, 1996
He was relatively young - 26 years old - visiting from France and observing the rules and habits of a then-young country, the United States. Nothing seemed more remarkable in 1831 to that Frenchman, Alexis de Tocqueville, than elections.Elections, like the wheel, had to be invented. Tocqueville marveled at the machinery - at Americans making elections reliable, true and ordinary. He applauded the imperfect, happy marriage between the theory and practice of democracy.He wrote about it admiringly in "Democracy in America," his portrait of a country that was still untouched by national ad campaigns, exit polls and instant analyses.
NEWS
March 22, 2003
STUDENTS at Montgomery Blair High School in Silver Spring put out a press release at mid-month announcing that on the day war commenced in Iraq, they would walk out at 1 p.m. The 70-minute demonstration, said the release, "has been organized with the cooperation of school administrators," and "no civil disobedience has been planned." When the students did walk out Thursday, some wearing "What Would Gandhi Do?" T-shirts in the soaking rain, they knew no one would be punished. Administrators were happy, too. They managed to channel anti-war sentiment into a teachable moment, a civics exercise that would have been sacrilege to a Vietnam-era protester.
NEWS
May 31, 2014
The opening of the Edgar Allan Poe House at 30 Amity Street was a small milestone in preserving important historical realities of Baltimore City. This opening also represented a significant achievement by a small number of citizens who realized that cooperative nonprofit action can serve a constructive purpose. It is interesting to note that the French sociologist Alexis de Tocqueville, in his work "Democracy in America," in the 1830s noted that Americans "are forever forming associations.
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2001
United Way of Central Maryland has exceeded its 2000 campaign goal, raising $43.1 million, 5 percent more than the previous year, campaign officials will announce this morning. "The citizens of Maryland have shown they care deeply about each other and their community," said Jim Sellinger, vice president of technical sales support for IBM Americas and chairman of the board of directors for United Way of Central Maryland. `The success of this breakthrough campaign allows United Way to focus even more funding on programs in our four areas of impact, helping even more people in need.
NEWS
July 4, 2000
TRY TRANSLATING the "pursuit of happiness" into almost any foreign language. It's not easy. "Life" and "liberty" have universal meanings, but the "pursuit of happiness" is a singularly AmeriM-W can construction. Yet this somewhat nebulous goal has given this country and its residents enviable vigor and vibrancy over the past 224 years. Whatever the Framers of the Declaration of Independence meant by it, today's reading of the phrase gives a license for Americans to apply themselves the best way they can. People can do their thing, whether sensible or stupid.
NEWS
March 22, 2003
STUDENTS at Montgomery Blair High School in Silver Spring put out a press release at mid-month announcing that on the day war commenced in Iraq, they would walk out at 1 p.m. The 70-minute demonstration, said the release, "has been organized with the cooperation of school administrators," and "no civil disobedience has been planned." When the students did walk out Thursday, some wearing "What Would Gandhi Do?" T-shirts in the soaking rain, they knew no one would be punished. Administrators were happy, too. They managed to channel anti-war sentiment into a teachable moment, a civics exercise that would have been sacrilege to a Vietnam-era protester.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 28, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The one thing about Bosnia that Americans all agree on: No one wants to see the military body bags arriving at Dover Air Force Base, the complex in Delaware where U. S. war dead arrive.The other near certainty: There will be American casualties and probably deaths.As President Clinton put it last night: "No deployment of American troops is risk free, and this one may well involve casualties."So how ready is the public to face fatalities among the 20,000 U.S. troops in a multi-national peace implementation force of 60,000 that could begin operations next month in the most explosive region of Europe since World War II?
NEWS
By RICHARD F. SCHUBERT | June 1, 1991
In Kansas City, Cliff Sargeon, the director of the LandlordNegotiation Committee, has led the effort to close down 200 crack houses.In Oklahoma City, William and Sandra Hale, a doctor-and-nurse team both stricken with multiple sclerosis, continue to run a free health clinic that serves thousands of indigent patients a year.In Glen Arden, Maryland, Van Standifer started a midnight basketball program to get teen-agers off drugs, off crime and off the street.The Points of Light Foundation was created a year ago not just to showcase individual programs like these, but to help raise the notion of voluntary service to the status of a national movement.
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2001
United Way of Central Maryland has exceeded its 2000 campaign goal, raising $43.1 million, 5 percent more than the previous year, campaign officials will announce this morning. "The citizens of Maryland have shown they care deeply about each other and their community," said Jim Sellinger, vice president of technical sales support for IBM Americas and chairman of the board of directors for United Way of Central Maryland. `The success of this breakthrough campaign allows United Way to focus even more funding on programs in our four areas of impact, helping even more people in need.
NEWS
July 4, 2000
TRY TRANSLATING the "pursuit of happiness" into almost any foreign language. It's not easy. "Life" and "liberty" have universal meanings, but the "pursuit of happiness" is a singularly AmeriM-W can construction. Yet this somewhat nebulous goal has given this country and its residents enviable vigor and vibrancy over the past 224 years. Whatever the Framers of the Declaration of Independence meant by it, today's reading of the phrase gives a license for Americans to apply themselves the best way they can. People can do their thing, whether sensible or stupid.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 1999
Parris N. Glendening has been Maryland's governor for 5 years. He taught government and politics at the University of Maryland, College Park for 27 years, until his election as Governor. His textbooks on government and politics have been used in more than 400 colleges. He was awarded the Breslau-Goldman Award for dedication to social justice."Democracy in America." Alexis de Tocqueville's timeless essays on the unique American culture and spirit. Written more than a century ago, de Tocqueville still captures the social, political and philosophical foundation of America better than any writer before or after.
NEWS
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 2, 1997
It's a tough gig, getting up in knee breeches, a frock coat and a white stock in front of a couple of dozen 10th-graders and condensing a book of more than 700 pages, "Democracy in America," into one or two ideas that the students can take home.Timothy Lynch, a 25-year-old graduate student from England, has been impersonating the book's author, Alexis de Tocqueville, since May. He's the live entertainment on a C-SPAN bus that's retracing the journey of the 19th-century French historian and sociologist, who toured the young United States in 1831 and 1832 in an attempt to comprehend democracy in action.
NEWS
BY A STAFF WRITER | November 4, 1996
He was relatively young - 26 years old - visiting from France and observing the rules and habits of a then-young country, the United States. Nothing seemed more remarkable in 1831 to that Frenchman, Alexis de Tocqueville, than elections.Elections, like the wheel, had to be invented. Tocqueville marveled at the machinery - at Americans making elections reliable, true and ordinary. He applauded the imperfect, happy marriage between the theory and practice of democracy.He wrote about it admiringly in "Democracy in America," his portrait of a country that was still untouched by national ad campaigns, exit polls and instant analyses.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 28, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The one thing about Bosnia that Americans all agree on: No one wants to see the military body bags arriving at Dover Air Force Base, the complex in Delaware where U. S. war dead arrive.The other near certainty: There will be American casualties and probably deaths.As President Clinton put it last night: "No deployment of American troops is risk free, and this one may well involve casualties."So how ready is the public to face fatalities among the 20,000 U.S. troops in a multi-national peace implementation force of 60,000 that could begin operations next month in the most explosive region of Europe since World War II?
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | April 4, 1994
This is not a column to glorify any one individual or company. But, there are things happening out there in the corporate world -- good things -- that tend to go unnoted.Many years ago, United Way of America applied a well-known successful fund-raising technique to its unique requirements. It formed the Alexis de Tocqueville Society, an exclusive club of donors who contribute $10,000 or more a year to their local United Way.Today, 152 local United Ways have de Tocqueville Societies. In 1992, 5,814 high-income donors gave $92 million.
NEWS
By PAUL H. LIBEN | February 16, 1993
Yonkers, New York. -- In Soviet tyranny's recent collapse, we have witnessed American democracy's decisive vindication. It is our democratic ideals and institutions that the anxious leaders of Eastern Europe and Russia wish to emulate. Clearly at stake is the salvation of their respective nations.In 1831, a 26-year-old aristocrat, Alexis de Tocqueville, had similar concerns. Revolutions in his beloved France in 1789 and 1830 had crippled its ancient triad of king, church and aristocracy. Seeing that an egalitarian social order was the French and European future, Tocqueville pondered this question: How could liberty, order and human dignity be preserved, and despotism, chaos and degradation be averted?
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | April 4, 1994
This is not a column to glorify any one individual or company. But, there are things happening out there in the corporate world -- good things -- that tend to go unnoted.Many years ago, United Way of America applied a well-known successful fund-raising technique to its unique requirements. It formed the Alexis de Tocqueville Society, an exclusive club of donors who contribute $10,000 or more a year to their local United Way.Today, 152 local United Ways have de Tocqueville Societies. In 1992, 5,814 high-income donors gave $92 million.
NEWS
By PAUL H. LIBEN | February 16, 1993
Yonkers, New York. -- In Soviet tyranny's recent collapse, we have witnessed American democracy's decisive vindication. It is our democratic ideals and institutions that the anxious leaders of Eastern Europe and Russia wish to emulate. Clearly at stake is the salvation of their respective nations.In 1831, a 26-year-old aristocrat, Alexis de Tocqueville, had similar concerns. Revolutions in his beloved France in 1789 and 1830 had crippled its ancient triad of king, church and aristocracy. Seeing that an egalitarian social order was the French and European future, Tocqueville pondered this question: How could liberty, order and human dignity be preserved, and despotism, chaos and degradation be averted?
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