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Alexander Nevsky

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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | June 14, 1995
`TC This week, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra takes its audience to the movies. In the final concerts of the regular subscription season, the orchestra, the BSO chorus and associate conductor David Lockington will provide the soundtrack to a restored print of Sergei Eisenstein's epic "Alexander Nevsky" -- the music Sergei Prokofiev wrote when he and Eisenstein collaborated on the film in 1938.Symphony orchestras throughout the United States are trying to resuscitate concertgoing with visual aids, but this "concert" is more than a stunt aimed at a television-age audience.
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NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | December 24, 2005
Hollywood's Christmas gift to us all: the classic King Kong, remade as a chick flick. I think I was in my mid-teens when I saw the original King Kong. It was at a theater near the corner of North Avenue and Charles Street. I can't remember the name. But I can remember who I was with when I saw it. There were about 40 of us, guys from different Baltimore high schools, all part of an Upward Bound program at the Johns Hopkins University. Most of the guys came from what a newspaper told us were "poor families."
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 13, 2003
There's a thin line between art and entertainment, an equally thin one between entertainment and propaganda. Sergei Eisenstein's 1938 film Alexander Nevsky, with its spectacular musical score by Sergei Prokofiev, manages to combine art, entertainment and propaganda in one indelible package. Today, the political implications do not overwhelm the movie, as they would have for audiences in the Soviet Union during the Stalin era. The artistic quality is what strikes home most forcefully now, as is bound to be the case when the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra presents a performance of Prokofiev's Alexander Nevsky in synch with the film tonight and tomorrow.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 14, 2003
Movie-making has advanced considerably since Sergei Eisenstein made his pro-Russian, anti-German (and anti-any other trespasser) Alexander Nevsky in 1938. Propaganda has gotten a lot slicker, too. But there's still something fresh about that film, with its frantic battle scenes, touches of humor and celebrations of self-sacrifice giving life to this tale of the 13th century hero who saved the motherland from a Teutonic horde. It has never lost the air of a classic, thanks in no small measure to the music written for it by Sergei Prokofiev.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 14, 2003
Movie-making has advanced considerably since Sergei Eisenstein made his pro-Russian, anti-German (and anti-any other trespasser) Alexander Nevsky in 1938. Propaganda has gotten a lot slicker, too. But there's still something fresh about that film, with its frantic battle scenes, touches of humor and celebrations of self-sacrifice giving life to this tale of the 13th century hero who saved the motherland from a Teutonic horde. It has never lost the air of a classic, thanks in no small measure to the music written for it by Sergei Prokofiev.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | June 16, 1995
The greatest marriage of sight and sound in the cinema was between Soviet filmmaker Sergei Eisenstein and his compatriot, composer Sergei Prokofiev. The first fruit of that partnership -- the 1938 film epic, "Alexander Nevsky" -- was the centerpiece last night in Meyerhoff Hall for the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's final program of the season.This was not the 40-minute cantata that Prokofiev fashioned from his film score. It was all 107 minutes of Eisenstein's great movie (in a fine-looking, restored print)
FEATURES
By Eric Siegel | March 10, 1991
Art advocates to lobby Congress for money, freedomArtists and arts leaders from around the country will gather in Washington March 20 for National Cultural Advocacy Day to lobby for increased federal support for the arts and to continue their dialogue about freedom of expression.Participants will hear speeches by members of Congress and their aides in the morning, followed by afternoon meetings between the two groups.A year ago, what organizers described as "the largest cultural contingent in recent history" massed in Washington in support of the embattled National Endowment for the Arts.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | December 24, 2005
Hollywood's Christmas gift to us all: the classic King Kong, remade as a chick flick. I think I was in my mid-teens when I saw the original King Kong. It was at a theater near the corner of North Avenue and Charles Street. I can't remember the name. But I can remember who I was with when I saw it. There were about 40 of us, guys from different Baltimore high schools, all part of an Upward Bound program at the Johns Hopkins University. Most of the guys came from what a newspaper told us were "poor families."
FEATURES
By Tim Smith | November 3, 2003
Yuri Temirkanov, music director of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, will not be on the podium this week as scheduled "so that he may undergo a routine medical procedure," according to a statement released by orchestra management over the weekend. Temirkanov is expected to resume his BSO schedule next week, rehearsing and conducting a program devoted to Sergei Prokofiev's score for the classic Sergei Eisenstein film Alexander Nevsky, performed in synch with the film. Last week, Temirkanov completed a month-long tour with his other orchestra, the St. Petersburg Philharmonic, which began in Asia and concluded in Berlin.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN STAFF | June 2, 1998
The news last week that Edward Polochick had decided to resign as director of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra Chorus took most of Baltimore's music community -- including myself -- by surprise.The departure of Polochick, who has been associated with the BSO since the early 1980s and who will remain music director of the Concert Artists of Baltimore, represents a big loss to music in Baltimore.I wish I had a dollar for every time I woke up in the morning and realized that I had forgotten in my review to mention Polochick's contribution to the excellence of the previous evening's performance of Mahler's Symphony No. 2, Prokofiev's "Alexander Nevsky" or Beethoven's Ninth.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 13, 2003
There's a thin line between art and entertainment, an equally thin one between entertainment and propaganda. Sergei Eisenstein's 1938 film Alexander Nevsky, with its spectacular musical score by Sergei Prokofiev, manages to combine art, entertainment and propaganda in one indelible package. Today, the political implications do not overwhelm the movie, as they would have for audiences in the Soviet Union during the Stalin era. The artistic quality is what strikes home most forcefully now, as is bound to be the case when the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra presents a performance of Prokofiev's Alexander Nevsky in synch with the film tonight and tomorrow.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | June 16, 1995
The greatest marriage of sight and sound in the cinema was between Soviet filmmaker Sergei Eisenstein and his compatriot, composer Sergei Prokofiev. The first fruit of that partnership -- the 1938 film epic, "Alexander Nevsky" -- was the centerpiece last night in Meyerhoff Hall for the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's final program of the season.This was not the 40-minute cantata that Prokofiev fashioned from his film score. It was all 107 minutes of Eisenstein's great movie (in a fine-looking, restored print)
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | June 14, 1995
`TC This week, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra takes its audience to the movies. In the final concerts of the regular subscription season, the orchestra, the BSO chorus and associate conductor David Lockington will provide the soundtrack to a restored print of Sergei Eisenstein's epic "Alexander Nevsky" -- the music Sergei Prokofiev wrote when he and Eisenstein collaborated on the film in 1938.Symphony orchestras throughout the United States are trying to resuscitate concertgoing with visual aids, but this "concert" is more than a stunt aimed at a television-age audience.
FEATURES
By Eric Siegel | March 10, 1991
Art advocates to lobby Congress for money, freedomArtists and arts leaders from around the country will gather in Washington March 20 for National Cultural Advocacy Day to lobby for increased federal support for the arts and to continue their dialogue about freedom of expression.Participants will hear speeches by members of Congress and their aides in the morning, followed by afternoon meetings between the two groups.A year ago, what organizers described as "the largest cultural contingent in recent history" massed in Washington in support of the embattled National Endowment for the Arts.
NEWS
June 21, 1995
Surely one of the more unusual programs the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra has offered in recent years was last week's performance of Prokofiev's classic score to "Alexander Nevsky," the 1938 film by director Sergei Eisenstein that has been called the world's first music video. Music lovers who attended this rare event -- the BSO played the score as the movie was shown on a screen suspended from the ceiling of Meyerhoff Hall -- heard a masterpiece: the only soundtrack ever to become part of the regular symphonic repertoire.
NEWS
February 23, 1997
IN VICTORY AND DEFEAT, the armed forces have occupied a special place in the hearts of ordinary Russians. Even after the Bolsheviks systematically destroyed bourgeois institutions, the armed forces represented a link to the pre-revolutionary past -- from the military innovations of Peter the Great to the heroism of Alexander Nevsky, A. V. Suvorov and M. I. Kutuzov.Six years after the collapse of communism, however, the once-vaunted Russian armed forces are on the ropes. Many officers have not been paid for months and have to survive by taking menial moonlighting jobs.
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