Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAlexander Lebed
IN THE NEWS

Alexander Lebed

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 20, 1996
THE PROMOTION of retired Gen. Alexander Lebed -- and the quick firing of Defense Minister Pavel Grachev -- are such stunningly deft and opportunistic moves on the part of President Boris N. Yeltsin that there is a danger of overestimating their long-term significance. In the short term, though, Mr. Yeltsin may well have assured his re-election by including his tough-talking No. 2 challenger in his inner circle as the top national security adviser.Unlike the United States, that position in Russia means overseeing both the armed forces and the internal security apparatus.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 29, 1996
MOSCOW -- In a bold challenge to President Boris N. Yeltsin, his security adviser, Alexander Lebed, said yesterday that the Russian leader's illness had left the nation adrift and suggested that he temporarily step down.Over the past week, Lebed has warned of army mutinies, new Chernobyls and the loss of Russia's scientific expertise. The not-so-subtle subtext of his remarks has been that the Yeltsin government has led Russia into a morass and that the nation's problems could be fixed only if Lebed is given more power.
Advertisement
NEWS
July 12, 1995
The hospitalization of Boris N. Yeltsin with "acute" heart troubles forces everyone to think about the day when he is no longer in power.As Russia's first post-Soviet president, Mr. Yeltsin has had an unenviably hard task. He has had both successes and failures. Many of his instincts have been good, even though his behavior has often been erratic.In his hard drinking and impulsiveness he is a true son of Russia, whose lifestyle recalls Alexei Tolstoy's adage: "When you love, love with passion; when you threaten, threaten with intention; when you insult, insult only in anger; when you strike, strike with all you've got; when you quarrel, quarrel with courage; when you punish, punish with a reason; when you forgive, forgive with all your heart, when you party, party through the night."
NEWS
September 29, 1996
RETIRED GEN. Alexander I. Lebed showed good sense and personal courage in brokering an end to hostilities in Chechnya. That's why his popularity is soaring and that's why he has started an aggressive campaign to succeed ailing President Boris N. Yeltsin.Already he is getting more publicity than Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin and Moscow Mayor Yuri Luzhkov, Mr. Lebed's rivals for the Kremlin throne.On many matters, close attention ought to be paid to Mr. Lebed's statements. He is right in calling public attention to the shameful conditions in the once-vaunted Red Army, where many officers and soldiers have not been paid for months, and warning a rebellion might ensue.
NEWS
August 26, 1996
SO MANY PEOPLE -- particularly in Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin's inner circle -- want retired Gen. Alexander Lebed to fail that the security chief's early success in bringing hostilities to an end in Chechnya is nothing short of stunning. Mr. Lebed's mission may ultimately fail because his rivals do not want him to acquire more power and prestige. But he has shown that negotiations with the separatists are possible and that the Chechens may be ready to abandon their demand for independence.
NEWS
August 13, 1996
THE CHECHEN rebel capture of Grozny coincided with the inauguration of President Boris N. Yeltsin and was meant to embarrass him. In encircling 7,000 Russian soldiers in the regional capital, the smaller rebel force demonstrated the disintegration of one of the world's biggest armies.The devastating loss of life in this battle has shocked Russia. Like Vietnam-era Americans a generation ago, Russians have watched the carnage every night on television. Though actual battle footage has been scarce, the commentary has conveyed an alarming picture of the nation's army in disarray.
NEWS
February 19, 1996
THE ODDS SEEM suicidal. If presidential elections were to be held today, Boris N. Yeltsin could count on seven percent of the vote, according to opinion polls. Can he recoup before the June 16 vote?In announcing that he is a candidate for re-election, Mr. Yeltsin clearly thinks so. Even as January data show Russia's economy shrank, unemployment rose and average wages fell, the country's first post-communist president believes he can overcome all the criticism and grumbling. "My duty as the politician who launched reforms is to consolidate all healthy forces and prevent shocks that could lead to a civil war," he declared on the stump in Yekaterinburg, his one-time Urals hometown.
NEWS
October 30, 1995
PRESIDENT BORIS YELTSIN'S second bout of health trouble in four months is a setback for the Balkan peace process. It comes shortly after a show of camaraderie between Mr. Yeltsin and President Clinton heralded "complete agreement" on the need to end the 3 1/2 -year Bosnian civil war. Discord remains on how Russian troops might be used alongside a dominant NATO force in policing a territorial and political settlement, but defense ministers were given orders...
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 29, 1996
MOSCOW -- In a bold challenge to President Boris N. Yeltsin, his security adviser, Alexander Lebed, said yesterday that the Russian leader's illness had left the nation adrift and suggested that he temporarily step down.Over the past week, Lebed has warned of army mutinies, new Chernobyls and the loss of Russia's scientific expertise. The not-so-subtle subtext of his remarks has been that the Yeltsin government has led Russia into a morass and that the nation's problems could be fixed only if Lebed is given more power.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 25, 1996
NOVYE ATAGI, Russia -- Peace between Russia and its mutinous republic of Chechnya seemed closer than ever yesterday. But peace between President Boris Yeltsin and his chief security adviser, Alexander Lebed, did not.Late Friday, Yeltsin halfheartedly endorsed Lebed's plan for ending the war in Chechnya and congratulated him on the progress he had made.Yesterday afternoon, aboard his plane en route to Novye Atagi from Moscow for more talks with the rebel leaders, Lebed angrily produced a decree signed by the president Aug. 18 and said that if its terms were enforced, it would be "almost impossible" to stop the war."
NEWS
August 26, 1996
SO MANY PEOPLE -- particularly in Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin's inner circle -- want retired Gen. Alexander Lebed to fail that the security chief's early success in bringing hostilities to an end in Chechnya is nothing short of stunning. Mr. Lebed's mission may ultimately fail because his rivals do not want him to acquire more power and prestige. But he has shown that negotiations with the separatists are possible and that the Chechens may be ready to abandon their demand for independence.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 25, 1996
NOVYE ATAGI, Russia -- Peace between Russia and its mutinous republic of Chechnya seemed closer than ever yesterday. But peace between President Boris Yeltsin and his chief security adviser, Alexander Lebed, did not.Late Friday, Yeltsin halfheartedly endorsed Lebed's plan for ending the war in Chechnya and congratulated him on the progress he had made.Yesterday afternoon, aboard his plane en route to Novye Atagi from Moscow for more talks with the rebel leaders, Lebed angrily produced a decree signed by the president Aug. 18 and said that if its terms were enforced, it would be "almost impossible" to stop the war."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 18, 1996
MOSCOW -- Top Russian and rebel field commanders in Chechnya said yesterday that they had agreed to give cease-fire orders to their troops.If a truce holds, it would be a victory for the Russian national security adviser, Alexander Lebed, who last week traveled twice to the region to seek peace.But Lebed appears to have lost the first battle in his effort to oust one of two top generals leading the fighting in Chechnya.The Russian news agency Interfax reported yesterday that Interior Minister Anatoly Kulikov, irate over Lebed's accusations that he is responsible for the bloodshed and military bungling in the separatist republic, telephoned President Boris N. Yeltsin on Friday to offer his resignation.
NEWS
August 13, 1996
THE CHECHEN rebel capture of Grozny coincided with the inauguration of President Boris N. Yeltsin and was meant to embarrass him. In encircling 7,000 Russian soldiers in the regional capital, the smaller rebel force demonstrated the disintegration of one of the world's biggest armies.The devastating loss of life in this battle has shocked Russia. Like Vietnam-era Americans a generation ago, Russians have watched the carnage every night on television. Though actual battle footage has been scarce, the commentary has conveyed an alarming picture of the nation's army in disarray.
NEWS
June 20, 1996
THE PROMOTION of retired Gen. Alexander Lebed -- and the quick firing of Defense Minister Pavel Grachev -- are such stunningly deft and opportunistic moves on the part of President Boris N. Yeltsin that there is a danger of overestimating their long-term significance. In the short term, though, Mr. Yeltsin may well have assured his re-election by including his tough-talking No. 2 challenger in his inner circle as the top national security adviser.Unlike the United States, that position in Russia means overseeing both the armed forces and the internal security apparatus.
NEWS
February 19, 1996
THE ODDS SEEM suicidal. If presidential elections were to be held today, Boris N. Yeltsin could count on seven percent of the vote, according to opinion polls. Can he recoup before the June 16 vote?In announcing that he is a candidate for re-election, Mr. Yeltsin clearly thinks so. Even as January data show Russia's economy shrank, unemployment rose and average wages fell, the country's first post-communist president believes he can overcome all the criticism and grumbling. "My duty as the politician who launched reforms is to consolidate all healthy forces and prevent shocks that could lead to a civil war," he declared on the stump in Yekaterinburg, his one-time Urals hometown.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 18, 1996
MOSCOW -- Top Russian and rebel field commanders in Chechnya said yesterday that they had agreed to give cease-fire orders to their troops.If a truce holds, it would be a victory for the Russian national security adviser, Alexander Lebed, who last week traveled twice to the region to seek peace.But Lebed appears to have lost the first battle in his effort to oust one of two top generals leading the fighting in Chechnya.The Russian news agency Interfax reported yesterday that Interior Minister Anatoly Kulikov, irate over Lebed's accusations that he is responsible for the bloodshed and military bungling in the separatist republic, telephoned President Boris N. Yeltsin on Friday to offer his resignation.
NEWS
By Clara Germani and Clara Germani,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 13, 1995
PUSHKINO, Russia -- It was not a sound-bite kind of day on the campaign trail. Vladimir V. Zhirinovsky, the shortest fuse in Russian politics, was not hot. The little curl of the lip that always seems to signal a headline coming was inactive.This suburban Moscow stop by the most active campaigner in Russian politics was a bust.When his black Mercedes and his retinue of burly bodyguards in black leather brought him to the 500-seat movie theater, it was only half-full with a mostly male and unresponsive group -- plus one stray dog patrolling back and forth in front of the stage.
NEWS
By Clara Germani and Clara Germani,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 13, 1995
PUSHKINO, Russia -- It was not a sound-bite kind of day on the campaign trail. Vladimir V. Zhirinovsky, the shortest fuse in Russian politics, was not hot. The little curl of the lip that always seems to signal a headline coming was inactive.This suburban Moscow stop by the most active campaigner in Russian politics was a bust.When his black Mercedes and his retinue of burly bodyguards in black leather brought him to the 500-seat movie theater, it was only half-full with a mostly male and unresponsive group -- plus one stray dog patrolling back and forth in front of the stage.
NEWS
October 30, 1995
PRESIDENT BORIS YELTSIN'S second bout of health trouble in four months is a setback for the Balkan peace process. It comes shortly after a show of camaraderie between Mr. Yeltsin and President Clinton heralded "complete agreement" on the need to end the 3 1/2 -year Bosnian civil war. Discord remains on how Russian troops might be used alongside a dominant NATO force in policing a territorial and political settlement, but defense ministers were given orders...
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.