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By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | November 3, 2002
If you watch television these days, you would think everyone running for office is trying to take medicine from your elderly parents, candy from your baby and money from your pocketbook, denying education to your children and generally subverting the American dream and ruining all that is good about this country. Such are the people who want to be our government's leaders. It's negative political advertising. "Hey, you might not like me, but my opponent is worse!" If pride in your candidate will not get you to the polls, then fear of the other guy - or gal - might.
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Editorial from The Aegis | October 3, 2013
The federal government sort of closed for business this week, a shameful display that unfortunately is neither unprecedented nor out of character. It's worth stressing the sort-of aspect of the shutdown because the U.S. Armed Forces remain on guard, the Postal Service continues to deliver the mail and, after the political lessons of the last self-inflicted federal shutdown, Social Security and other checks will still be cut and distributed. In other words, no one involved thinks the country is going to close up shop and the states go their separate ways.
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By Richard W. Smith | October 19, 1994
Philadelphia, 1787 -- THE SUMMER-long Constitutional Convention ended Sept. 15, and now it's up to the states to decide whether to ratify the document that sets up the government. However, this momentous event is being upstaged an unprecedented probing by the media into the personal lives, finances and other matters related to many of the key players of the fledgling government. Following are just some of the stories reported during and after the convention:* Evangelist Pat Robertson's Christian television news service reported that 81-year-old Benjamin Franklin had intimate relationships with French and English ladies -- both inside and outside the nobility -- during the inventor's stint as an envoy for the young revolutionary government.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,Sun reporter | July 16, 2008
Middle school students at the Crossroads School near Fells Point were evaluated by teachers every single day last school year, with the results driving the next day's instruction. At East Baltimore's Fort Worthington Elementary, about a quarter of the school's parents turned out for MSA Family Fun Night and sampled questions from the Maryland School Assessments. Alexander Hamilton Elementary, situated in a West Baltimore neighborhood that the principal calls "gang-infested," started a gifted education program last year to challenge students to learn beyond their grade levels.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Sun Staff Writer | March 23, 1995
Can the music from "Louie, Louie" save young lives and souls?At Rehoboth Church of God in Christ Jesus Apostolic, they believe it can. The West Baltimore church yesterday welcomed 80 children from nearby Alexander Hamilton Elementary School to keep them in prayer and out of trouble.Rehoboth is one of three city churches that have heeded the Maryland League of Women's Clubs' call for churches to open their doors whenever there are early dismissals. Macedonia Baptist Church and Enon Baptist also are participating in the "Adopt a School" program.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | May 8, 2005
A few years ago, Washington College decided to boost what seemed to be general public apathy about the man for whom the school was named by creating a book prize in his honor. Compared with presidents who inspired the popular imagination - like Lincoln, Jefferson or the Roosevelts - George Washington was thought a rather indistinct, remote figure. An annual $50,000 might not only stir attention for the first chief executive but also encourage more scholarship about the man. And what happened when the first George Washington Book Prize was announced last night at Washington's home in Mount Vernon?
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,Sun reporter | July 16, 2008
Middle school students at the Crossroads School near Fells Point were evaluated by teachers every single day last school year, with the results driving the next day's instruction. At East Baltimore's Fort Worthington Elementary, about a quarter of the school's parents turned out for MSA Family Fun Night and sampled questions from the Maryland School Assessments. Alexander Hamilton Elementary, situated in a West Baltimore neighborhood that the principal calls "gang-infested," started a gifted education program last year to challenge students to learn beyond their grade levels.
NEWS
By Jane Meredith Adams and Jane Meredith Adams,Contributing Writer | February 28, 1993
SAN FRANCISCO -- The meeting of American Legion Post 44 was well under way last week when three old-time Legionnaires in blue Legionnaire caps poked their heads into the room, looked around at the crowd and quickly retreated.This was not the American Legion they knew, a network of 16,000 posts around the nation where conservative war veterans could swill a beer and talk about the old days.At Post 448, known as the Alexander Hamilton post, the majority of the veterans are gay, the beverages are wine and coffee and the talk is not of battles past but of the current struggle for gay rights in the military.
NEWS
March 23, 2006
Firefighters battle series of brush, woods blazes Baltimore County firefighters battled a series of brush and woods blazes yesterday -- the latest in a string of fires in the area attributed in part to the dry and breezy conditions, fire officials said. A four-acre brush fire began about 11 a.m. yesterday in the 1700 block of Bluemount Road in Monkton, fire officials said. The fire was contained about an hour later, fire officials said. About two hours later, firefighters were working to put out a three-acre fire in the 9900 block of Sherwood Farm Road near Owings Mills, fire officials said.
NEWS
By Stevenson Swanson and Stevenson Swanson,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 11, 2004
WEEHAWKEN, N.J. - To use a term that the most financially savvy of the Founding Fathers would have appreciated, the market is bullish these days for anything related to Alexander Hamilton. As this Hudson River town prepares to commemorate the 200th anniversary today of the duel in which Hamilton was mortally wounded, a new, 818-page biography of the first Treasury secretary is ensconced on the best-seller list, and a major exhibition devoted to his life is set to open at a New York museum in September.
NEWS
March 23, 2006
Firefighters battle series of brush, woods blazes Baltimore County firefighters battled a series of brush and woods blazes yesterday -- the latest in a string of fires in the area attributed in part to the dry and breezy conditions, fire officials said. A four-acre brush fire began about 11 a.m. yesterday in the 1700 block of Bluemount Road in Monkton, fire officials said. The fire was contained about an hour later, fire officials said. About two hours later, firefighters were working to put out a three-acre fire in the 9900 block of Sherwood Farm Road near Owings Mills, fire officials said.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | May 8, 2005
A few years ago, Washington College decided to boost what seemed to be general public apathy about the man for whom the school was named by creating a book prize in his honor. Compared with presidents who inspired the popular imagination - like Lincoln, Jefferson or the Roosevelts - George Washington was thought a rather indistinct, remote figure. An annual $50,000 might not only stir attention for the first chief executive but also encourage more scholarship about the man. And what happened when the first George Washington Book Prize was announced last night at Washington's home in Mount Vernon?
NEWS
By Stevenson Swanson and Stevenson Swanson,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 11, 2004
WEEHAWKEN, N.J. - To use a term that the most financially savvy of the Founding Fathers would have appreciated, the market is bullish these days for anything related to Alexander Hamilton. As this Hudson River town prepares to commemorate the 200th anniversary today of the duel in which Hamilton was mortally wounded, a new, 818-page biography of the first Treasury secretary is ensconced on the best-seller list, and a major exhibition devoted to his life is set to open at a New York museum in September.
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | November 3, 2002
If you watch television these days, you would think everyone running for office is trying to take medicine from your elderly parents, candy from your baby and money from your pocketbook, denying education to your children and generally subverting the American dream and ruining all that is good about this country. Such are the people who want to be our government's leaders. It's negative political advertising. "Hey, you might not like me, but my opponent is worse!" If pride in your candidate will not get you to the polls, then fear of the other guy - or gal - might.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David W. Marston and David W. Marston,Special to the Sun | January 23, 2000
"Scandalmonger," by William Safire. Simon & Schuster. 496 pages. $27. George Washington, portrayed in "Scandalmonger" as a hypocrite who likely defrauded the federal government, actually gets off easy. Other American icons, notably Thomas Jefferson (an "atheist and fanatic") and Alexander Hamilton (an "illegitimate brat") are cheerfully swiped off their pedestals in William Safire's latest historical novel, and tossed into a rollicking political saga in which revered Founding Fathers behave pretty much like, well, President Clinton.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Will Englund and Scott Shane and Will Englund,SUN STAFF | September 5, 1999
Just three years ago, financial publications buzzed with news of the eye-popping returns available to intrepid investors in Russia. A Russian oil company's stock had jumped 40 percent in a week. Russian government bonds were paying as much as 200 percent interest. The value of the Moscow Times stock index had tripled in a year.No U.S. company moved more aggressively into the promising but volatile Russian market than the Bank of New York. Despite its conservative reputation and 18th-century pedigree -- it was founded by none other than Alexander Hamilton -- the bank elbowed out competitors to seize Russian business.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David W. Marston and David W. Marston,Special to the Sun | January 23, 2000
"Scandalmonger," by William Safire. Simon & Schuster. 496 pages. $27. George Washington, portrayed in "Scandalmonger" as a hypocrite who likely defrauded the federal government, actually gets off easy. Other American icons, notably Thomas Jefferson (an "atheist and fanatic") and Alexander Hamilton (an "illegitimate brat") are cheerfully swiped off their pedestals in William Safire's latest historical novel, and tossed into a rollicking political saga in which revered Founding Fathers behave pretty much like, well, President Clinton.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | October 3, 2013
The federal government sort of closed for business this week, a shameful display that unfortunately is neither unprecedented nor out of character. It's worth stressing the sort-of aspect of the shutdown because the U.S. Armed Forces remain on guard, the Postal Service continues to deliver the mail and, after the political lessons of the last self-inflicted federal shutdown, Social Security and other checks will still be cut and distributed. In other words, no one involved thinks the country is going to close up shop and the states go their separate ways.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | July 11, 1998
Dear Camille Cosby:Please come to Baltimore. You need, desperately, to talk to a man named Kenneth Lee.According to the July 8 USA Today, you believe "America taught our son's killer to hate African-Americans." You then launched into a litany of America's "institutional" white racism sins: the images of holy people as white, the definition of black as evil, the inclusion of the movie "Birth of a Nation" in the American Film Institute's list of the top 100 American films.In what must have been a real stretch, you even criticized U.S. currency as part of the problem.
NEWS
By Marilyn McCraven and Marilyn McCraven,SUN STAFF | May 31, 1997
Travis Hardy wasn't sure he was making a statement -- fashion or otherwise -- with his tuxedo pants and vest as he twirled on the stage of Alexander Hamilton Elementary School yesterday. But, for the adults in the audience, his performance and those of his 23 fellow student-models spoke volumes."Three-quarters of these kids did 80 percent of the work on these garments themselves -- that shows that they listened, they learned and we see the results," said Gregory Hardy, Travis' father and a master tailor who began teaching weekly sewing classes at the West Baltimore school in January.
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