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Alexander Calder

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May 7, 1991
Alexander Calder's 14-foot-tall, red metal sculpture "100 Yard Dash" can now be seen in the Baltimore Museum of Art's Levi Sculpture garden, which has reopened to the public.The Calder stabile of 1969 is one of 30 sculptures given to the BMA by Ryda and Robert Levi, of which 14 are now in the garden including works by Joan Miro, Isamu Noguchi, Louise Nevelson and Ellsworth Kelly. The rest, including works by David Smith, Henry Moore and George Rickey, are expected to be moved from the Levis' Baltimore County estate by the end of 1994, though not all will be installed outside.
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By Pat van den Beemt, pvdb@comcast.net | October 10, 2011
I don't have an art history background, so I hadn't heard the name Alexander Calder before. Then, in the course of one week, the famous artist/sculptor's name came up in connection with two completely different stories I was writing. I met Alexander Calder's great-nephew, Jim Calder, who was hired to carve an eagle out of a dead tree trunk in White Hall. When I asked him about his amazing artistic ability, he told me about his long line of relatives who excelled in art, including Alexander Calder.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | April 5, 1998
No art of the 20th century is more lyrically beautiful than Alexander Calder's mobiles, now on view in a retrospective at Washington's National Gallery.Rigorously balanced sculptures of wood and metal pieces, suspended from wires and moving randomly in space, mobiles are like silent music drifting across the air.Their little pods of abstract form glide slowly and softly this way and that, gradually modulating from one formation to another. They defy easy description. What now looks like an undulating wave may in a few minutes suggest a dedicated and slightly awkward young dancer practicing a turn, and then a little later may bring to mind a fluttering cascade of leaves.
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By Mary Ellen Graybill and Mary Ellen Graybill,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 24, 2004
NEW PARK, Pa. -- Jay McGinnis, 46, farms 500 acres of scenic cropland near the Mason-Dixon Line, and he has created an unusual side industry with Woolen Mill Fan Co., which makes old-time belt-and-pulley ceiling fans with solid mahogany blades. McGinnis finds inspiration in the work of Alexander Calder (1898-1976), the American kinetic artist who added movement to sculpture and created mobiles. Although McGinnis is succeeding as the designer of ceiling fans, he once failed seventh-grade art at Kennard Dale Middle School.
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By Pat van den Beemt, pvdb@comcast.net | October 10, 2011
I don't have an art history background, so I hadn't heard the name Alexander Calder before. Then, in the course of one week, the famous artist/sculptor's name came up in connection with two completely different stories I was writing. I met Alexander Calder's great-nephew, Jim Calder, who was hired to carve an eagle out of a dead tree trunk in White Hall. When I asked him about his amazing artistic ability, he told me about his long line of relatives who excelled in art, including Alexander Calder.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 10, 2003
Life may indeed imitate art, but the deal is commutative. Art also imitates life. And the century just past, with its world wars, holocausts, nuclear explosions, five-year plans and media-fed mass culture, has inspired a body of art as depressing, angst-ridden and emotionally raw as the era that spawned it. That's why the varied works of Alexander Calder (1898-1976) are such a delight. Ingenuity, clarity and a spirit of play animate the prints, sculptures, mobiles, etchings, lithographs, woolen tapestries and book illustrations churned out with such regularity by the Pennsylvania-born artist, whose breezy inner vision did so much to leaven the heaviness of his aesthetic time.
FEATURES
By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 2, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Living in Paris during the 1920s, four American artists -- Man Ray, Gerald Murphy, Stuart Davis and Alexander Calder -- helped to erase the boundaries between the arts and to redefine art itself.Their work is featured in "Americans In Paris," the exceptional exhibit of 103 paintings, photographs and sculptures celebrating the 75th anniversary of the Phillips Collection.In a letter dated April 5, 1922, Man Ray (1890-1976) suggests the innovative spirit that informs his work and most of the work in the exhibit: " I have freed myself from the sticky medium of paint and am working directly with light itself.
NEWS
By Mary Ellen Graybill and Mary Ellen Graybill,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 24, 2004
NEW PARK, Pa. -- Jay McGinnis, 46, farms 500 acres of scenic cropland near the Mason-Dixon Line, and he has created an unusual side industry with Woolen Mill Fan Co., which makes old-time belt-and-pulley ceiling fans with solid mahogany blades. McGinnis finds inspiration in the work of Alexander Calder (1898-1976), the American kinetic artist who added movement to sculpture and created mobiles. Although McGinnis is succeeding as the designer of ceiling fans, he once failed seventh-grade art at Kennard Dale Middle School.
NEWS
By Daniel Grant and Daniel Grant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 29, 1996
Last year, a small auction house in California, which was offering some sculptures by the late artist Robert Arneson, contacted Arneson's New York art dealer to inquire whether he would be interested in putting in a bid. "The works," said George Adams, director of New York City's Frumkin/Adams Gallery, "looked vaguely like Arneson's, but I was far from convinced."Adams sent photographs of the sculptures to Arneson's widow, who identified them as having been done by the artist's sons when they were 10 and 12. The dealer then notified the auction house of the correct attribution of those works.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Judith Green | May 1, 1997
Towson State University's dance company will celebrate its 25th anniversary this weekend with a gala program that goes -- choreographically speaking -- all over the map.Consider the featured works: "Panorama," a 1935 abstract dance for 33 women by Martha Graham, and the classic 19th century ballet blanc "Les Sylphides," to music of Chopin."
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 10, 2003
Life may indeed imitate art, but the deal is commutative. Art also imitates life. And the century just past, with its world wars, holocausts, nuclear explosions, five-year plans and media-fed mass culture, has inspired a body of art as depressing, angst-ridden and emotionally raw as the era that spawned it. That's why the varied works of Alexander Calder (1898-1976) are such a delight. Ingenuity, clarity and a spirit of play animate the prints, sculptures, mobiles, etchings, lithographs, woolen tapestries and book illustrations churned out with such regularity by the Pennsylvania-born artist, whose breezy inner vision did so much to leaven the heaviness of his aesthetic time.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | April 5, 1998
No art of the 20th century is more lyrically beautiful than Alexander Calder's mobiles, now on view in a retrospective at Washington's National Gallery.Rigorously balanced sculptures of wood and metal pieces, suspended from wires and moving randomly in space, mobiles are like silent music drifting across the air.Their little pods of abstract form glide slowly and softly this way and that, gradually modulating from one formation to another. They defy easy description. What now looks like an undulating wave may in a few minutes suggest a dedicated and slightly awkward young dancer practicing a turn, and then a little later may bring to mind a fluttering cascade of leaves.
FEATURES
By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 2, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Living in Paris during the 1920s, four American artists -- Man Ray, Gerald Murphy, Stuart Davis and Alexander Calder -- helped to erase the boundaries between the arts and to redefine art itself.Their work is featured in "Americans In Paris," the exceptional exhibit of 103 paintings, photographs and sculptures celebrating the 75th anniversary of the Phillips Collection.In a letter dated April 5, 1922, Man Ray (1890-1976) suggests the innovative spirit that informs his work and most of the work in the exhibit: " I have freed myself from the sticky medium of paint and am working directly with light itself.
FEATURES
May 7, 1991
Alexander Calder's 14-foot-tall, red metal sculpture "100 Yard Dash" can now be seen in the Baltimore Museum of Art's Levi Sculpture garden, which has reopened to the public.The Calder stabile of 1969 is one of 30 sculptures given to the BMA by Ryda and Robert Levi, of which 14 are now in the garden including works by Joan Miro, Isamu Noguchi, Louise Nevelson and Ellsworth Kelly. The rest, including works by David Smith, Henry Moore and George Rickey, are expected to be moved from the Levis' Baltimore County estate by the end of 1994, though not all will be installed outside.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey | March 3, 1991
Alexander Calder's "One Hundred Yard Dash" (1969), a 14-foot-tall orange-red stabile, is expected to be moved into the Robert and Ryda H. Levi Sculpture Garden at the Baltimore Museum of Art this spring.It will be a major addition, serving as one of two "anchors" at the center of the garden along with Tony Smith's "Spitball" (1961), already in place.The garden is scheduled to be closed March 11 for renovation and new planting, and will reopen about May 1. During the process, said BMA deputy director Brenda Richardson, Mark di Suvero's "Sister Lu" (1978-1979)
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | September 17, 1998
Photographer Yousuf Karsh, now almost 90, has been one of the most successful portrait photographers in history. His subjects include presidents Dwight D. Eisenhower and John F. Kennedy, first lady Jacqueline Kennedy, the present British queen when she was Princess Elizabeth, artists Alexander Calder and Pablo Picasso, movie stars Laurence Olivier and Clark Gable, scientist Albert Einstein, Pope John Paul II and writers Robert Frost and Ernest Hemingway....
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