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By Sports Digest | October 15, 2010
Wizards Arenas suffers strained groin in preseason loss to Bucks Gilbert Arenas made his return to the Verizon Center court, and it wasn't a long one. Two nights after he conceded that he faked a left knee injury, Arenas played just three minutes before exiting the Washington Wizards' 96-88 preseason loss to the Milwaukee Bucks on Thursday night with strained right groin. Arenas didn't attempt a shot, but had three steals, a rebound, an assist and a blocked shot in his first home game since being suspended for bringing guns to the locker room.
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SPORTS
By Sports Digest | October 15, 2010
Wizards Arenas suffers strained groin in preseason loss to Bucks Gilbert Arenas made his return to the Verizon Center court, and it wasn't a long one. Two nights after he conceded that he faked a left knee injury, Arenas played just three minutes before exiting the Washington Wizards' 96-88 preseason loss to the Milwaukee Bucks on Thursday night with strained right groin. Arenas didn't attempt a shot, but had three steals, a rebound, an assist and a blocked shot in his first home game since being suspended for bringing guns to the locker room.
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SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,mike.klingaman@baltsun.com | November 12, 2009
He is 77, the last surviving offensive lineman from the Baltimore Colts' halcyon days of the 1950s. Half a century ago, guard Alex Sandusky made a living carving out daylight for runners named Lenny and L.G. and The Horse, and rebuffing assaults on a slope-shouldered young quarterback who had won the hearts of Colts fans. It was Sandusky's job to safeguard John Unitas, which he did for more than a decade. "You took pride in protecting John. Everyone was focused on that," said Sandusky, a Colt from 1954 through 1966.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,mike.klingaman@baltsun.com | November 12, 2009
He is 77, the last surviving offensive lineman from the Baltimore Colts' halcyon days of the 1950s. Half a century ago, guard Alex Sandusky made a living carving out daylight for runners named Lenny and L.G. and The Horse, and rebuffing assaults on a slope-shouldered young quarterback who had won the hearts of Colts fans. It was Sandusky's job to safeguard John Unitas, which he did for more than a decade. "You took pride in protecting John. Everyone was focused on that," said Sandusky, a Colt from 1954 through 1966.
SPORTS
By DON VITEK | January 22, 1995
Marge Ernandis knows how a lot of Anne Arundel County folks can eat; she's serving the grandchildren of her original customers."I was already working at the snack bar here [at Riviera Bowl] when Alex [Sandusky] bought the place," Ernandis said. "I took a part-time job here because I could walk to work. I lived just across the field. Well, I guess I could still walk to work if I wanted to, it's just that everything has grown up around the center."Growth will happen over a lifetime, and that's how long Ernandis has been behind the snack bar at Sandusky's Colt Riviera Lanes.
SPORTS
By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,SUN STAFF | September 18, 1996
A former Colt and former Oriole are among the five honorees for the sixth induction class of the Anne Arundel County Sports Hall of Fame. This year's inductees, who will be honored at a banquet at Michael's Eighth Avenue in Glen Burnie on Oct. 24, bring the total of those enshrined to 30.Alex Sandusky, one of the greatest offensive linemen in Baltimore Colts history, ex-Orioles outfielder Barry Shetrone, premier horse trainer King Leatherbury, two-time Navy...
NEWS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,Evening Sun Staff | March 15, 1991
Not a day passes that Big Jim Parker doesn't think of John Unitas. The two former Colt greats are depicted in an oil painting that hangs on the wall of Parker's liquor store in Forest Park.The painting (circa 1958) shows Parker, a lineman, protecting his quarterback as Unitas fades back to pass.More than three decades later, the portrait seems eerily symbolic. Last month, Unitas-the-businessman dropped deep into his pocket and filed for Chapter 11 reorganization in U.S. Bankruptcy Court, raising Parker's concerns for his old teammate.
NEWS
By Matt Vensel | November 11, 2011
Gerry Sandusky has never met Jerry Sandusky. There is no relation. The sports director for WBAL and the radio voice of the Ravens has only been in State College, Pa., once in his life, and that was 24 years ago. But after the sex abuse scandal at Penn State involving former defensive coordinator, Jerry Sandusky, became a major national news story this past weekend, Gerry Sandusky watched fans and colleagues steer clear of him before Sunday night's...
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | May 21, 2008
Gerry Sandusky, sportscaster for WBAL television, is the son of John Sandusky, not Alex Sandusky. The television broadcast of the 1958 National Football League championship game between the Baltimore Colts and New York Giants has been lost to history, but the radio broadcast still exists. There were more mistakes in that game, Sandusky said, than there were in the much-maligned Super Bowl V between the Colts and the Dallas Cowboys. Was I really supposed to be learning all this sports stuff at the Maryland Historical Society?
NEWS
By Donald G. Vitek | September 5, 1991
The Riviera Beach area has changed. It's easy to say that everythinghas changed, but it's not always true. Some things even while changing remain pretty much the same.The bowling center was called AlexSandusky's Riviera Bowl 30 years ago when Sandusky bought the centerwithin a year of its construction. It's called Riviera Bowl now, buta Sandusky is still in charge.Steve Sandusky was raised in the Riviera Beach center, and he learned the business from the ground up."When I was a youngster, Dadmade me learn the business," Sandusky said.
NEWS
December 31, 1997
AS PART OF the farewell football game at Memorial Stadium this month, fans buying programs to the Ravens-Oilers contest received a nostalgic bonus: A reprint of a 1954 Colts program. My, how times have changed in those 43 years!Tickets were ridiculously cheap. Pro football had yet to become a national craze. You could order a "1955 season book" for box seats in the upper or lower stands for $25.20. That's not for one game, mind you, but for the entire six-game home schedule. Four dollars and twenty cents per game.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff Writer | September 10, 1993
The Riviera Bowl was so quiet Wednesday afternoon you could hear a pin drop.Steve Sandusky, standing in the nearly empty bowling alley, had picked up a spare, which is not unusual for the owner of the 32-year-old duckpin alley on Fort Smallwood Road. Except he was not bowling; he was "rowling."Mr. Sandusky, son of former Baltimore Colts star Alex Sandusky, shuffled down the lane pushing the ball with a 4-foot pole. Approaching the foul line, he gave the pole a shove sending the ball rolling gently down the lane toward the 10 duckpins 60 feet away.
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