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By Peter Schmuck, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2014
If you think, or are hoping, that the 162-game suspension imposed on New York Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez has brought an end to the Biogenesis saga or A-Rod's controvery-laced career, think again. The ruling by arbitrator Frederic Horowitz, which reduced the original suspension that Major League Baseball handed down to Rodriguez from 211 games to 162, may stand up to a federal court challenge by Rodriguez and his small army of attorneys, but you can bet that we'll still be wondering next month whether he'll be allowed to start the 2014 season.
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By Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2014
Guess we can all stop wondering what the New York Yankees are going to do with the $25 million annual increase in their national television revenues. They spent almost that much per year on Japanese pitcher Masahiro Tanaka , if you combine their reported seven-year, $155 million deal with the $20 million posting fee they must pay to Japan's Rakuten Golden Eagles to pry him out of his existing contract. That's just crazy, of course, but why should anyone be surprised? Not only did the Yankees get that boost from the new national TV contracts that kick in this season, but they also will save about that much if Alex Rodriguez and his lawyers don't find a federal judge to strike down his one-year Biogenesis suspension.
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By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | July 25, 1999
The Orioles will have to work hard this winter to rebuild their sagging image, and what better way to do that than by making a major play for Seattle Mariners superstar Alex Rodriguez.Rodriguez, who can become a free agent after the 2000 season, has given every indication that he is not interested in signing a contract extension with the Mariners during the coming off-season. He's apparently looking forward to breaking baseball's salary record the following year.Look for the Mariners to solicit bids and try to get a huge package of major- and minor-league talent for him. The Orioles are not flush on the farm, but they probably could package a major-league starter and a couple of their "untouchable" minor leaguers to acquire one of the best all-around players in baseball.
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By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2014
For years I've heard the bellyaching about how the Orioles can't compete financially with the big boys in the American League East, specifically the New York Yankees and Boston Red Sox. Well, now it looks like everyone, including the Red Sox, can join hands and sing in protest to those mighty, free-spending Yankees. Not really, of course. Teams are free to spend however they want in the free market that is Major League Baseball. (And there sure is a sense the Orioles could do a lot more with their payroll; see Peter Schmuck's column today )
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By BILL ORDINE | February 18, 2009
Really, what else could the guy do? Alex Rodriguez already had the confessional examples of New York Yankees teammates Jason Giambi and Andy Pettitte, and closer to home here, the Orioles' Brian Roberts, as illustration that throwing oneself on the mercy of the court of public opinion seems to be the best policy when it comes to these steroid scandals. While we take perverse glee in seeing heroes tumble, we also seem to enjoy having the opportunity to forgive them for their sins after a humble mea culpa and a little groveling.
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By CHILDS WALKER | February 18, 2009
Alex Rodriguez had to face the New York media firing squad before getting back to the business of baseball. So in the sense that he endured a mandatory flogging, I suppose he moved forward with yesterday's news conference. But the chances of A-Rod scoring any major public relations points were slim going in. And his performance did not transcend those low expectations. He was contrite, but he had already demonstrated that in his interview with ESPN's Peter Gammons. He trotted out some decent defenses of his legacy, namely that his two best seasons came in 1996 and 2007, well outside his admitted window of drug use. But he had floated those arguments before.
NEWS
December 13, 2000
SURE, Alex Rodriguez is a superbly talented baseball player, one of the best young shortstops in the major leagues. But is he, at age 25, worth a quarter-billion dollars? He apparently is to the Texas Rangers, a team rich in reserves thanks to a lucrative cable and broadcast deal. But for the majority of baseball teams, signing Mr. Rodriguez to a $252 million, 10-year contract was never remotely possible. They can't afford it. Thus, the disparity in baseball between rich, large-market clubs and small-market teams has widened.
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By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | April 27, 2001
NEW YORK - This can't really be happening, can it? The Seattle Mariners were supposed to be Exhibit A in Major League Baseball's next argument for cost control - the team that was so ravaged by free agency (and the prospect of it) that its fans could be forgiven for wondering why they kicked in all that public money to build Safeco Field. Future Hall of Fame pitcher Randy Johnson was traded to the Houston Astros during the 1998 season because of the huge contract he would soon command as a free agent.
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By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | December 13, 2000
Shortstop Alex Rodriguez won't be the first person to make a quarter billion dollars off Texas Rangers owner Tom Hicks. A bunch of other guys, led by a fellow named George W. Bush - yeah, that one - already took that amount from Hicks back in 1998, and all they had to do was give him their baseball team. It almost makes A-Rod's new contract - 10 seasons of work in the blazing Texas summer - seem a raw deal by comparison. Which only goes to show that even the most outrageously greedy deal in the history of professional sports ($252 million per decade!
NEWS
September 3, 2009
Not to be overly cynical, but what message, exactly, were the students of Milford Mill Academy supposed to take away from Tuesday's surprise anti-steroid talk by the New York Yankees star Alex Rodriguez? He came to the school to discourage students from taking steroids by sharing his story, which goes something like this: From 2001-2003, starting just after signing a contract with the Texas Rangers that made him the highest-paid player in the history of Major League Baseball, Mr. Rodriguez took steroids.
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By Peter Schmuck, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2014
If you think, or are hoping, that the 162-game suspension imposed on New York Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez has brought an end to the Biogenesis saga or A-Rod's controvery-laced career, think again. The ruling by arbitrator Frederic Horowitz, which reduced the original suspension that Major League Baseball handed down to Rodriguez from 211 games to 162, may stand up to a federal court challenge by Rodriguez and his small army of attorneys, but you can bet that we'll still be wondering next month whether he'll be allowed to start the 2014 season.
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By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2013
Orioles manager Buck Showalter said his comments to USA Today - in which he said that allowing the Yankees to take Alex Rodriguez's salary off their books would allow them to unfairly skirt the luxury tax, ensuring that O's catcher Matt Wieters would end up in pinstripes once he becomes a free agent - weren't intended for public consumption. In the USA Today story, Showalter is quoted as saying: "If [commissioner] Bud [Selig] lets them get away with that, they're under the luxury tax. If they can reset, they can spend again and I guarantee you in two years Matt Wieters is in New York.
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The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2013
Orioles manager Buck Showalter isn't happy with some of the possible repercussions from the looming suspension of New York Yankees slugger Alex Rodriguez. Speaking to USA Today, Showalter said he will "guarantee you" that Orioles catcher Matt Wieters will be playing for the Yankees when he becomes a free agent after the 2015 season if Major League Baseball commissioner Bud Selig suspends Rodriguez for at least next season. As USA Today notes, according to the collective bargaining agreement, the portion of a player's salary that he does not collect while suspended also does not count toward his team's payroll and the luxury tax threshold.
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Peter Schmuck | July 4, 2013
There was a time not so long ago when it was pretty easy for baseball fans to handicap the pennant races and predict which division winners and wild-card teams would make it into the postseason. All you had to do was follow the money. The New York Yankees and Boston Red Sox were almost automatic. The dirt-cheap Tampa Bay Rays were the most glaring exception, but the playoffs were largely populated with the teams carrying the biggest payrolls. It was not a counterintuitive equation, of course, in the only major American professional sports league without a salary cap. The notion that money can buy you anything - love, happiness, a World Series trophy - is as American as apple pie, but something is happening in 2013 that defies all economic and competitive logic.
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By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2013
Ever since the Orioles drafted Manny Machado with the third pick overall out of a Miami high school in 2010, there were comparisons with another former Miami phenom. Machado may never shake the Alex Rodriguez comparisons - which was the ultimate compliment a few years ago. But with Rodriguez's injury and off-field issues, no one wants to be called the next ARod anymore. Regardless, Rodriguez was an amazing player almost from the start of his big league career. And Machado has been excellent in his short time with the Orioles.
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By Kevin Cowherd and The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2013
The Orioles waste no time jumping into the thick of the American League East race, that's for sure. After the three-game series with the Tampa Bay Rays that starts with today's season opener, they'll open a six game road trip against the Boston Red Sox and the New York Yankees Monday.  And it's the Yankees, with all their injuries to big-name players and their aging lineup, who figure to be one of baseball's most intriguing stories this season.  It was only one game, but the Yankees' offense looked anemic in an 8-2 loss to the Red Sox Monday at Yankee Stadium.
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By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2004
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - New York Yankees owner George Steinbrenner has gone to great lengths to maintain his dollar-driven dynasty, but - believe it or not - the acquisition of superstar Alex Rodriguez is not about The Boss' flexing his substantial economic muscle. This time, it's personal. Steinbrenner has bought more than his share of American League pennants and World Series trophies, and he certainly is not above doing that again, but his motivation for pushing the Yankees' payroll near $200 million is much more complicated.
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March 18, 2006
Good morning -- Alex Rodriguez -- OK, so maybe you're not Mr. March after all.
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January 30, 2013
It's worth a shot Juan C. Rodriguez Sun Sentinel Should they try? Absolutely. Would they be successful? Probably not. Alex Rodriguez has been an on-field and off-field migraine for the Yankees. What remains on his contract - five years and $114 million - is a crippling figure for most franchises. If they were to somehow remove the Rodriguez albatross it won't be because he purchased banned substances. The Joint Drug Prevention and Treatment Program precludes teams from taking punitive action beyond penalties the Commissioner's Office imposes.
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Kevin Cowherd, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2012
Orioles fans are chortling this morning after the Detroit Tigers routed the New York Yankees 8-1 Thursday for a four-game sweep of the American League Championship Series. This was an unbelievably humiliating series for the Yankees, which always plays well here. It's been fun watching the notorious New York media savage the home team, too. The Yankees seemed intent in mailing this one in from the beginning. It didn't help that Yankees' ace  C.C. Sabathia, who surrendered 11 hits and six runs, appeared to be throwing batting practice to the Tigers yesterday.
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