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By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Sun Staff Writer | January 2, 1995
This is James Patterson's first book since his breakthrough thriller of 1993, "Along Came a Spider," and in it the author brings back Washington homicide detective Alex Cross. In "Spider," Cross, a streetwise policeman who also happened to have a doctorate in abnormal psychology from Johns Hopkins University, helped solve a vexing serial-murder case that involved not only the affluent Georgetown area but also his own Southeast Washington neighborhood.In "Kiss the Girls," Cross confronts another serial killer -- or is it two?
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By Dave Rosenthal | August 13, 2012
Though E.L. James has received recent headlines for the phenomenal sales of "Fifty Shades of Grey," stalwart James Patterson remains the highest-earning author, according to Forbes. The magazine estimates that Patterson made $94 million last year, with nearly all of that revenue coming from book sales and relatively little from TV and film royalties. Patterson published 14 new titles in 2011, Forbes said. Patterson manintains his prodigious output because he works as a writer/editor, often teaming with others who bang out thrillers under his direction.
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By Dave Rosenthal | August 13, 2012
Though E.L. James has received recent headlines for the phenomenal sales of "Fifty Shades of Grey," stalwart James Patterson remains the highest-earning author, according to Forbes. The magazine estimates that Patterson made $94 million last year, with nearly all of that revenue coming from book sales and relatively little from TV and film royalties. Patterson published 14 new titles in 2011, Forbes said. Patterson manintains his prodigious output because he works as a writer/editor, often teaming with others who bang out thrillers under his direction.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | November 24, 2002
The staggering commercial success of top commodity fiction intrigues me. Why do millions of readers devour the works of a small number of writers of very thin literary merit or emotional conviction? Those I have read have obvious qualities: energy, invitation to escape, nourishment of harmless fantasies and plots that seize readers' attention from the opening page. But so do hundreds of other mass-market aspiring writers. Why these? Now comes my most recent foray into that mysterious territory: Four Blind Mice by James Patterson (Little, Brown, 400 pages, $27.95)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | December 10, 2000
It starts out, Bang! On the first page, the reader meets Brianne Parker, a 24-year-old professional killer with a "pleasantly plump baby face" but no qualms about doing her job. Within five and half pages, it becomes about as cool, cruel, scary as you can get. There's more. Lots more -- intricately conceived, punctiliously executed, with murderous bank robberies. The tale unrolls almost entirely in and around Washington and suburban Maryland. There are two FBI agents, Betsey Cavalierre and Kyle Craig, who collaborate with the main character, Alex Cross.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | November 24, 2002
The staggering commercial success of top commodity fiction intrigues me. Why do millions of readers devour the works of a small number of writers of very thin literary merit or emotional conviction? Those I have read have obvious qualities: energy, invitation to escape, nourishment of harmless fantasies and plots that seize readers' attention from the opening page. But so do hundreds of other mass-market aspiring writers. Why these? Now comes my most recent foray into that mysterious territory: Four Blind Mice by James Patterson (Little, Brown, 400 pages, $27.95)
TRAVEL
September 20, 2009
2009 National Book Festival Where: : National Mall, between Seventh and 14th streets in Washington When: : 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Saturday What: : A slew of celebrity writers from John Irving to Jodi Picoult are scheduled to take part in this year's National Book Festival, organized by the Library of Congress to celebrate the joy of reading. Book signings take place throughout the day at pavilions dedicated to fiction, children, biography, poetry, mysteries and more. Authors expected to participate include James Patterson, Marilynne Robinson, Judy Blume, John Grisham, Junot Diaz, Colson Whitehead, Jeannette Walls and Julia Glass.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2008
monday Cross Country : by James Patterson (Little, Brown, $27.99) When the home of Alex Cross' oldest friend is turned into the worst murder scene Alex has ever seen, the destruction leads him to believe that he's chasing a horrible new breed of killer. As Alex and his girlfriend become entangled in the deadly Nigerian underworld of Washington, D.C., what they discover is shocking: an organized gang of teenagers headed by a diabolical man - an African warlord. tuesday The Private Patient : by P.D. James (Knopf, $25.95)
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By Dave Rosenthal | October 3, 2013
Tom Clancy, the Baltimore author who died this week at age 66, will be remembered as the king of the techno-thriller novel . But he also was a leading example of a modern day phenomenon: the author whose works spawn a hugely profitable, multi-media franchise. Clancy's books sparked Hollywood blockbusters such as "The Hunt for Red October," "Patriot Games" and “Clear and Present Danger.” They also were turned into video games such as "Ghost Recon" and the "Splinter Cell" series.
EXPLORE
October 20, 2012
now playing "Alex Cross" (PG-13). A serial killer pushes a detective/psychologist for the Detroit Police Department (Tyler Perry) to the edge. With Edward Burns, Matthew Fox, Jean Reno, Carmen Ejogo, Cicely Tyson, Rachel Nichols and Werner Daehn. TownMall Cinemas (11:30 a.m., 2:00, 4:30, 7:20 p.m.) "Argo" (R). In 1979, after Iranian revolutionaries storm the U.S. embassy in Tehran, a CIA 'exfiltration' specialist concocts a risky plan to free six Americans trapped.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | December 10, 2000
It starts out, Bang! On the first page, the reader meets Brianne Parker, a 24-year-old professional killer with a "pleasantly plump baby face" but no qualms about doing her job. Within five and half pages, it becomes about as cool, cruel, scary as you can get. There's more. Lots more -- intricately conceived, punctiliously executed, with murderous bank robberies. The tale unrolls almost entirely in and around Washington and suburban Maryland. There are two FBI agents, Betsey Cavalierre and Kyle Craig, who collaborate with the main character, Alex Cross.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Sun Staff Writer | January 2, 1995
This is James Patterson's first book since his breakthrough thriller of 1993, "Along Came a Spider," and in it the author brings back Washington homicide detective Alex Cross. In "Spider," Cross, a streetwise policeman who also happened to have a doctorate in abnormal psychology from Johns Hopkins University, helped solve a vexing serial-murder case that involved not only the affluent Georgetown area but also his own Southeast Washington neighborhood.In "Kiss the Girls," Cross confronts another serial killer -- or is it two?
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 6, 2001
Morgan Freeman is such a commanding presence and wonderful actor that just watching him walk across the screen can be a thrill. Freeman is hands down the best thing about "Along Came a Spider," a briskly paced suspense thriller that allows him to reprise the role (from 1997's "Kiss the Girls") of Alex Cross, a D.C. police detective and psychologist who gets inside bad guys' heads. His presence alone almost negates the film's myriad sins - including a resolution that becomes obvious about halfway through the movie.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,COX NEWS SERVICE | October 3, 1997
What hath "The Silence of the Lambs" wrought?It was inevitable, when that film swept the 1991 Academy Awards, that a bevy of imitators would begin to clog the production pipeline, the drain screen of which let "Seven" escape onto screens in 1995.As if that particular abomination weren't enough, another has slipped through Hollywood's dubious quality-control system. "Kiss the Girls," an adaptation of the James Patterson novel directed by Gary Fleder, takes sadistic crypto-sexism to new depths (which happen to be attractively appointed with Gothically dripping candles and Craftsman sconces)
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