Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAlex Cooper
IN THE NEWS

Alex Cooper

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2010
The ornate baton of a Nazi field marshal convicted of war crimes against Italian citizens during World War II caused a sensation in Towson Saturday when it brought $731,600 at auction, far more than Alex Cooper auctioneers or the baton's owner ever expected. The 19-inch ceremonial baton, once the property of Field Marshal Albert Kesselring of Nazi Germany's Luftwaffe, had been listed with an estimated value of between $10,000 and $15,000 by Alex Cooper before the auction. The baton was wrapped in bright blue velvet and adorned with white and yellow gold and enamel insignias and crosses.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2010
The ornate baton of a Nazi field marshal convicted of war crimes against Italian citizens during World War II caused a sensation in Towson Saturday when it brought $731,600 at auction, far more than Alex Cooper auctioneers or the baton's owner ever expected. The 19-inch ceremonial baton, once the property of Field Marshal Albert Kesselring of Nazi Germany's Luftwaffe, had been listed with an estimated value of between $10,000 and $15,000 by Alex Cooper before the auction. The baton was wrapped in bright blue velvet and adorned with white and yellow gold and enamel insignias and crosses.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,ed.gunts@baltsun.com | November 2, 2008
The former residence of Maryland artist Grace Turnbull was withdrawn from a scheduled auction yesterday, but the auctioneers said representatives for Turnbull's estate would still entertain private offers for the property at 223 Chancery Road in Guilford. A sale of Turnbull's personal property, including sculptures, paintings, books and furniture, will proceed during an auction that is scheduled to begin at 10 a.m. today at Alex Cooper Auctioneers, 908 York Road in Towson. Turnbull died in 1976 and left her Spanish Colonial-style house and much of her artwork to the Maryland Historical Society, which has maintained them for more than 30 years.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins | jamie.smith.hopkins@baltsun.com | March 28, 2010
Real estate auctioneers coax buyers to pay more. These days, Paul R. Cooper also urges sellers to accept less. Cooper, a vice president at Alex Cooper Auctioneers in Towson, one of the biggest operations of its kind in the state, says many homeowners still have inflated ideas of what their property is worth, despite four years of mostly bad news about the housing market. Cooper, who joined his family's business 30 years ago after training as an accountant, sells everything from rowhouses to restaurants.
NEWS
By Elizabeth A. Shack and Elizabeth A. Shack,SUN STAFF | September 22, 2002
A football used in the 1958 game in which John Unitas and the Baltimore Colts won their first National Football League championship sold for $30,000 to a lifelong New York Giants fan at a Towson auction yesterday. The buyer, Eric Inselberg, 31, has been collecting Giants souvenirs since he was 15. He came to Maryland from his home in northern New Jersey solely for the sports memorabilia auction, one of nearly 100 people who turned out at the Alex Cooper auction house to bid on items from the estate of a former Colts equipment manager.
FEATURES
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | July 15, 2004
Scene: An auction house in Towson. Richard Hall, an appraiser at Alex Cooper, is giving a preview of the estate of Anne Carey Boucher, a portrait painter. Boucher, who died a year ago, left 18th century French pieces and rare garden seats and a rosewood table, Regency style, from about 1810 that feels more like a Baltimore-made piece than an import. It's not as stylized as ones made in England then, which might be worth $1,000. Made in Baltimore, though, it could bring $1,500. "People want to buy their own history," Hall says.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,gadi.dechter@baltsun.com | January 7, 2009
From its new perch on the wall of an ornate State House meeting room, the recently unveiled portrait of former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. can finally gaze down on the $37,500 rug he ordered in early 2006. The handmade custom piece from India - featuring an 8-foot-in-diameter replica of the Maryland seal - is one of several lush touches to a $10 million renovation receiving its de facto unveiling today. Less visible will be the rich red fabric that covers faded wallpaper in Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller's inner office - part of a separate $10,000 job paid for with Senate funds, according to Miller's chief of staff, Vicki Gruber.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Sean Somerville and Bill Atkinson and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | May 6, 1999
Two waterfront properties owned by a co-founder of the troubled downtown investment advisory firm, Coleman Craten LLC, are scheduled to be auctioned Monday, according to court documents and published notices.Monica L. Coleman owes more than $1.8 million in principal and interest on the Pasadena properties, according to lawsuits. The auction was scheduled after Coleman failed to make payments on the homes, according to the lawsuits filed by an individual retirement account that lent her the money.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF | May 20, 1997
Carl Easterwood paid $400 yesterday for a rusted pile of golf clubs, covered with mothballs and dust. But inside a pocket of the faded bag was a 1905 Scottish golf ball -- worth an estimated $400 to $500.The ball was among the 80 items auctioned yesterday in Towson from the estate of recluse Elizabeth C. "Nancy" Smith, who died in February. She was the owner of 300 acres of undeveloped farmland in the middle of east Columbia, land now sought by some of her relatives, commercial developers and preservationists.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2001
A 1917 Baltimore County mansion that was once the home of Gen. Douglas MacArthur remains for sale after owners rejected a $1.4 million auction bid yesterday. Three groups registered to bid on the Irish-Georgian-style mansion, which sits on 19 acres at 10700 Park Heights Ave. in Green Spring Valley. Known as Rainbow Hall, the property was the Baptist Home of Maryland/Delaware Inc. nursing home for 38 years. Bidding started at $1 million, and when the unidentified high bidder raised the bar to $1.4 million with no one exceeding it, the auctioneers temporarily suspended the event.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,laura.vozzella@baltsun.com | January 9, 2009
So Bob Ehrlich has a rug after all. The $37,500 custom carpet he ordered as governor in early 2006 was just installed in the State House, setting off a new round of woolly-headed speculation: Does the mustachioed fisherman on the right look a little Indian? Not Native American. Indian as in from India, the Asian subcontinent where the thing was made. At the center of the handmade Indo Sarouk-style rug is a replica of the Maryland state seal, which includes images of a farmer and a fisherman.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,gadi.dechter@baltsun.com | January 7, 2009
From its new perch on the wall of an ornate State House meeting room, the recently unveiled portrait of former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. can finally gaze down on the $37,500 rug he ordered in early 2006. The handmade custom piece from India - featuring an 8-foot-in-diameter replica of the Maryland seal - is one of several lush touches to a $10 million renovation receiving its de facto unveiling today. Less visible will be the rich red fabric that covers faded wallpaper in Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller's inner office - part of a separate $10,000 job paid for with Senate funds, according to Miller's chief of staff, Vicki Gruber.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,ed.gunts@baltsun.com | November 2, 2008
The former residence of Maryland artist Grace Turnbull was withdrawn from a scheduled auction yesterday, but the auctioneers said representatives for Turnbull's estate would still entertain private offers for the property at 223 Chancery Road in Guilford. A sale of Turnbull's personal property, including sculptures, paintings, books and furniture, will proceed during an auction that is scheduled to begin at 10 a.m. today at Alex Cooper Auctioneers, 908 York Road in Towson. Turnbull died in 1976 and left her Spanish Colonial-style house and much of her artwork to the Maryland Historical Society, which has maintained them for more than 30 years.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | May 29, 2005
Twenty-five residential properties for sale, nearly 250 hopeful buyers. It's an auction. It's a frenzy. "It's ... the market today," says Jon Levinson, vice president of Alex Cooper Auctioneers Inc. in Towson, maneuvering his way last week through the standing-room-only crowd of investors hoping for a bargain. "This never would have happened five years ago." A real estate revolution is afoot: For a growing number of Americans, homes are becoming more than just a place to live. With fast-rising prices, no-money-down mortgages and stubbornly low interest rates, investing in a second or even a third house seems to more and more people like a can't-lose proposition that beats jittery stocks.
FEATURES
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | July 15, 2004
Scene: An auction house in Towson. Richard Hall, an appraiser at Alex Cooper, is giving a preview of the estate of Anne Carey Boucher, a portrait painter. Boucher, who died a year ago, left 18th century French pieces and rare garden seats and a rosewood table, Regency style, from about 1810 that feels more like a Baltimore-made piece than an import. It's not as stylized as ones made in England then, which might be worth $1,000. Made in Baltimore, though, it could bring $1,500. "People want to buy their own history," Hall says.
NEWS
By Elizabeth A. Shack and Elizabeth A. Shack,SUN STAFF | September 22, 2002
A football used in the 1958 game in which John Unitas and the Baltimore Colts won their first National Football League championship sold for $30,000 to a lifelong New York Giants fan at a Towson auction yesterday. The buyer, Eric Inselberg, 31, has been collecting Giants souvenirs since he was 15. He came to Maryland from his home in northern New Jersey solely for the sports memorabilia auction, one of nearly 100 people who turned out at the Alex Cooper auction house to bid on items from the estate of a former Colts equipment manager.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,laura.vozzella@baltsun.com | January 9, 2009
So Bob Ehrlich has a rug after all. The $37,500 custom carpet he ordered as governor in early 2006 was just installed in the State House, setting off a new round of woolly-headed speculation: Does the mustachioed fisherman on the right look a little Indian? Not Native American. Indian as in from India, the Asian subcontinent where the thing was made. At the center of the handmade Indo Sarouk-style rug is a replica of the Maryland state seal, which includes images of a farmer and a fisherman.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 21, 1996
Baltimore loses another long-time radio voice this week.Elane Stein, a fixture on Baltimore's airwaves for more than three decades, will broadcast the last of her radio spots over WBAL-AM (1090) at 11: 30 a.m. Friday.After that, it's off to Santa Fe, N.M., where she plans to take advantage of the town's burgeoning cultural scene. She also plans to have little -- if anything -- to do with radio there, other than as a listener."I don't like to use that word 'retire,' because I don't ever consider myself retired," she says.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2001
A 1917 Baltimore County mansion that was once the home of Gen. Douglas MacArthur remains for sale after owners rejected a $1.4 million auction bid yesterday. Three groups registered to bid on the Irish-Georgian-style mansion, which sits on 19 acres at 10700 Park Heights Ave. in Green Spring Valley. Known as Rainbow Hall, the property was the Baptist Home of Maryland/Delaware Inc. nursing home for 38 years. Bidding started at $1 million, and when the unidentified high bidder raised the bar to $1.4 million with no one exceeding it, the auctioneers temporarily suspended the event.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Sean Somerville and Bill Atkinson and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | May 6, 1999
Two waterfront properties owned by a co-founder of the troubled downtown investment advisory firm, Coleman Craten LLC, are scheduled to be auctioned Monday, according to court documents and published notices.Monica L. Coleman owes more than $1.8 million in principal and interest on the Pasadena properties, according to lawsuits. The auction was scheduled after Coleman failed to make payments on the homes, according to the lawsuits filed by an individual retirement account that lent her the money.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.