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Aldrich Ames

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Susan Reimer | December 17, 2012
Jeanne Vertefeuille and Sandra Grimes could be George Smiley's people. They were recruited on their college campuses by the Central Intelligence Agency during the height of the Cold War. Jeanne wanted travel and adventure. Sandy didn't know much about the CIA; she just needed a job. Jeanne and Sandy. That's how they refer to themselves in the book they co-authored, "Circle of Treason. " It tells the story of these two women - Jeanne worked her way up from the equivalent of the steno pool, while Sandy was immediately in the Soviet division (and over her head)
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NEWS
By Kenneth Lasson | February 27, 2013
President Barack Obama's forthcoming trip to Israel affords him a special opportunity to mend political fences and guarantee a warm popular reception in that country, while at the same time ensuring that justice is served here at home. These are goals he should surely embrace - and he could achieve them by heeding the pleas of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and President Shimon Peres, as well as many high-minded Americans, and freeing Jonathan Pollard from prison. Mr. Pollard was convicted in 1985 for having passed classified information to Israel.
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NEWS
By DAN BERGER | September 30, 1994
His CIA controllers have ruled that Aldrich Ames will get no more victims, especially not them.If disaster could happen on as calm a body of water as the Baltic, treat the Chesapeake with respect.Virginians could not stop Grant but, by God, they were not going to be rolled over by Mickey Mouse.Polls show that Bill Brock is as popular in Maryland as in Tennessee.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | December 17, 2012
Jeanne Vertefeuille and Sandra Grimes could be George Smiley's people. They were recruited on their college campuses by the Central Intelligence Agency during the height of the Cold War. Jeanne wanted travel and adventure. Sandy didn't know much about the CIA; she just needed a job. Jeanne and Sandy. That's how they refer to themselves in the book they co-authored, "Circle of Treason. " It tells the story of these two women - Jeanne worked her way up from the equivalent of the steno pool, while Sandy was immediately in the Soviet division (and over her head)
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 20, 1994
ALEXANDRIA, Va. -- A distraught Rosario Ames says she had no knowledge of her husband's activities in the intelligence world and is bitter and angry over the shattering of her family's life by the couple's arrest on spying allegations.In her first interview since her arrest on Feb. 21, Mrs. Ames contended yesterday that portrayals of her as a "Mata Hari" figure in an alleged conspiracy that funneled CIA secrets to the Russians could not be further from the truth."I never worked for the Soviets," she said in the hour-long interview, which was conducted in the presence of her attorney, William B. Cummings, at the Alexandria city jail, where she is being held awaiting possible federal grand jury indictment or a plea bargain in her case.
NEWS
By Thomas Powers | November 8, 1995
YET ANOTHER SHOE, the heaviest so far, has been dropped by the many-footed super-spy Aldrich H. Ames -- this one in the form of a damaging admission by the new director of the Central Intelligence Agency, John M. Deutch, that, beginning in 1985, the agency, without warning of any kind, passed on information to the White House from Soviet ''spies'' known or suspected to be working for the other side. Aldrich Ames himself is in federal prison serving a life term for his treachery, which included the betrayal of at least 10 genuine spies later executed by the Soviets.
NEWS
By GLENN McNATT | May 14, 1994
The failures of an intelligence agency are often more apparent than its successes. So it is with the scandal now enveloping the Central Intelligence Agency after the disclosure that CIA spymaster Aldrich Ames had secretly been on Moscow's payroll for years.Ames' exposure has prompted much hand-wringing inside the administration, as well as calls in Congress for hearings on why the agency blundered so badly. The public deserves an accounting for a failure of this magnitude. Though such judgments are always difficult for outsiders to make, there seems little doubt the Ames fiasco represented one of the worst security breaches in the CIA's 45-year history.
NEWS
By William Safire | March 18, 1994
THE "poly lobby" -- the legion of psychological charlatans who claim their machines can unerringly detect lying -- suffered a severe setback when it was revealed that Aldrich Ames, the accused Russian mole, passed two polygraph exams.The merchants of sweat at the FBI moved quickly to protect their livelihood by putting out word that the machines worked -- but that incompetent CIA polygraphers had misread the results.The CIA angrily disputes this leak from the poly lobby even as it reviews old cardiovascular charts of top officials.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | November 21, 1996
PARIS -- On the day that Alger Hiss' death was made known, the New York Times reported that Richard Nuccio, a senior State Department officer, has been threatened with criminal charges and faces the ruin of his government career because last year he made it known to a member of the House Intelligence Committee that the CIA had repeatedly lied to it, in defiance of the law, about its responsibility in the murders of an American citizen and the husband of...
NEWS
December 30, 1996
Collective bargaining good for workersSo the Greater Baltimore Committee, Greater Washington Board of Trade and Maryland Chamber of Commerce are willing to spend several hundred thousands of dollars suing the governor over collective bargaining for state employees.Is this an example of creativity, which the private sector always claims as its own? Is this an example of leadership?What the business community really hates about collective bargaining for state employees is the idea that the employees might enjoy good pay, good benefits and good working conditions.
NEWS
December 30, 1996
Collective bargaining good for workersSo the Greater Baltimore Committee, Greater Washington Board of Trade and Maryland Chamber of Commerce are willing to spend several hundred thousands of dollars suing the governor over collective bargaining for state employees.Is this an example of creativity, which the private sector always claims as its own? Is this an example of leadership?What the business community really hates about collective bargaining for state employees is the idea that the employees might enjoy good pay, good benefits and good working conditions.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | November 21, 1996
PARIS -- On the day that Alger Hiss' death was made known, the New York Times reported that Richard Nuccio, a senior State Department officer, has been threatened with criminal charges and faces the ruin of his government career because last year he made it known to a member of the House Intelligence Committee that the CIA had repeatedly lied to it, in defiance of the law, about its responsibility in the murders of an American citizen and the husband of...
NEWS
By Thomas Powers | November 8, 1995
YET ANOTHER SHOE, the heaviest so far, has been dropped by the many-footed super-spy Aldrich H. Ames -- this one in the form of a damaging admission by the new director of the Central Intelligence Agency, John M. Deutch, that, beginning in 1985, the agency, without warning of any kind, passed on information to the White House from Soviet ''spies'' known or suspected to be working for the other side. Aldrich Ames himself is in federal prison serving a life term for his treachery, which included the betrayal of at least 10 genuine spies later executed by the Soviets.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | September 30, 1994
His CIA controllers have ruled that Aldrich Ames will get no more victims, especially not them.If disaster could happen on as calm a body of water as the Baltic, treat the Chesapeake with respect.Virginians could not stop Grant but, by God, they were not going to be rolled over by Mickey Mouse.Polls show that Bill Brock is as popular in Maryland as in Tennessee.
NEWS
By GLENN McNATT | May 14, 1994
The failures of an intelligence agency are often more apparent than its successes. So it is with the scandal now enveloping the Central Intelligence Agency after the disclosure that CIA spymaster Aldrich Ames had secretly been on Moscow's payroll for years.Ames' exposure has prompted much hand-wringing inside the administration, as well as calls in Congress for hearings on why the agency blundered so badly. The public deserves an accounting for a failure of this magnitude. Though such judgments are always difficult for outsiders to make, there seems little doubt the Ames fiasco represented one of the worst security breaches in the CIA's 45-year history.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 20, 1994
ALEXANDRIA, Va. -- A distraught Rosario Ames says she had no knowledge of her husband's activities in the intelligence world and is bitter and angry over the shattering of her family's life by the couple's arrest on spying allegations.In her first interview since her arrest on Feb. 21, Mrs. Ames contended yesterday that portrayals of her as a "Mata Hari" figure in an alleged conspiracy that funneled CIA secrets to the Russians could not be further from the truth."I never worked for the Soviets," she said in the hour-long interview, which was conducted in the presence of her attorney, William B. Cummings, at the Alexandria city jail, where she is being held awaiting possible federal grand jury indictment or a plea bargain in her case.
NEWS
By Kenneth Lasson | February 27, 2013
President Barack Obama's forthcoming trip to Israel affords him a special opportunity to mend political fences and guarantee a warm popular reception in that country, while at the same time ensuring that justice is served here at home. These are goals he should surely embrace - and he could achieve them by heeding the pleas of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and President Shimon Peres, as well as many high-minded Americans, and freeing Jonathan Pollard from prison. Mr. Pollard was convicted in 1985 for having passed classified information to Israel.
NEWS
February 18, 1996
Since the preposterous plot is not meant to be taken seriously, even by the characters who struggle in its contradictory meshes, Safire concentrates his considerable energies on stuffing their mouths with knowing references to journalism, publishing, high finance, the CIA and KGB ... One hinge of his plot involves the workings of presidential covert-action findings, no very mysterious process, but one that Safire is determined to get wrong ... His ignorance...
NEWS
By William Safire | March 18, 1994
THE "poly lobby" -- the legion of psychological charlatans who claim their machines can unerringly detect lying -- suffered a severe setback when it was revealed that Aldrich Ames, the accused Russian mole, passed two polygraph exams.The merchants of sweat at the FBI moved quickly to protect their livelihood by putting out word that the machines worked -- but that incompetent CIA polygraphers had misread the results.The CIA angrily disputes this leak from the poly lobby even as it reviews old cardiovascular charts of top officials.
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