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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 14, 2001
This season's strike zone seems to be causing more conflict between the umpires and Major League Baseball officials than between umpires and players. Umpires are outraged over instructions that have come to some of them in the past 10 days via e-mail and telephone calls from Sandy Alderson, baseball's chief of operations, two persons who had been told by umpires said yesterday. Alderson said that either the messages had been misinterpreted or the reaction "is all part of a political agenda that some people have," stemming from the bitter feelings between two factions of umpires over which union would represent them.
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SPORTS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | August 6, 2005
The Atlanta Braves hadn't won a thing in seven years when they installed Bobby Cox as manager 65 games into the 1990 season. They haven't finished a full season out of first place since. So a manager must be pretty important to a baseball franchise, right? Well, consider an alternative example from Orioles history. Earl Weaver was a genius, pretty much any baseball person will tell you. He went through 15 seasons and three generations of talent without guiding a loser and retired after the 1982 Orioles won 94 games.
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SPORTS
February 26, 1992
Oakland Athletics general manager Sandy Alderson says the club lost from $5 million to $6 million in operating expenses last year and stands to lose more this year.If payments for collusion damages are added to last year's losses, the total A's deficit for 1991 stands between $7 million and $10 million, Alderson said.Alderson revealed those figures because some A's players want to extend their contracts this spring and the club is unwilling to do so.* YANKEES: Relief pitcher Steve Howe, who previously refused to discuss the drug charges against him, spoke briefly about his case for the first time.
FEATURES
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | December 24, 2004
There will be no chocolate Armagnac truffles in Alderson Federal Prison Camp this Christmas. No glistening apple caramel steamed pudding. No golden crusty eggnog custard cups. Alas, for Alderson inmate and fine food maven Martha Stewart, perfectly poached pears with gingerbread will be missing, too. It seems that her temporary incarceration in West Virginia has put a depressing damper on her usual fine dining, the domestic doyenne told fans in a holiday greeting on her personal Web site this week.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1999
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- Major League Baseball executive vice president Sandy Alderson and the two sons of Orioles owner Peter Angelos will lead a large logistical team to Havana today to work out the details for the Orioles visit to Cuba on March 28.Major-league officials, representatives of sports network ESPN and a groundskeeping adviser also will take part in the two-day trip that will pave the way for the Orioles and a large contingent of officials and...
SPORTS
By Joe Strauss and Joe Strauss,SUN STAFF | November 8, 2000
AMELIA ISLAND, Fla. - Major League Baseball hopes to reverse its recent explosion of offense by enforcing the textbook definition of its strike zone while studying raising the height of the pitching mound, MLB executive director of baseball operations Sandy Alderson said yesterday at the general managers' meetings. Blamed for long games, overaggressive hitters and defensive pitching, the strike zone has too long been a matter of interpretation, according to Alderson, who briefed general managers on the new enforcement during a morning meeting.
FEATURES
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | December 24, 2004
There will be no chocolate Armagnac truffles in Alderson Federal Prison Camp this Christmas. No glistening apple caramel steamed pudding. No golden crusty eggnog custard cups. Alas, for Alderson inmate and fine food maven Martha Stewart, perfectly poached pears with gingerbread will be missing, too. It seems that her temporary incarceration in West Virginia has put a depressing damper on her usual fine dining, the domestic doyenne told fans in a holiday greeting on her personal Web site this week.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson | February 28, 1999
Christopher Alderson knows first-hand how dicey it can be to manage a mutual fund that invests in developing countries.In the early 1990s, he was driven out of Malaysia at gunpoint by armed guards after asking "a lot of detailed questions of the Malaysian authorities." One guard even put a gun to Alderson's head."I got accused of being a spy," said Alderson, who manages the T. Rowe Price Emerging Market Stock Fund.Being pushed around by gun-toting heavies may be a hair-raising experience, but it almost pales in comparison with the plunging currency markets and cratering economies that have rocked the sector.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 30, 2004
She wanted Connecticut. She would have settled for Florida. But yesterday, Martha Stewart was assigned to serve her sentence at a federal women's prison in Alderson, W.Va., the place to which she had hoped not to be sent. The minimum-security prison in the foothills of the Alleghany Mountains has housed such prominent inmates as the singer Billie Holiday, who was convicted of drug charges, and Lynette "Squeaky" Fromme, a member of the Charles Manson family. It also holds a special place in penal history.
NEWS
November 23, 1992
* Name: Chris Wess, 15, of Columbia.* School: Sophomore at Atholton High School.* Why Chris was honored: He participated in the 1992 Summer at the Mall Internship, a six-week program that exposes students in the Maryland's Tomorrow Program to different jobs, such as engineering, construction, marketing and accounting. Although Chris is still working to improve his grade-point average, he has earned B's in science and math. Last year, he earned many failing grades, he said. His attitude about school has brightened, said Susan Alderson, Atholton's co-coordinator of Maryland's Tomorrow Program, which encourages students to stay in school.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 30, 2004
She wanted Connecticut. She would have settled for Florida. But yesterday, Martha Stewart was assigned to serve her sentence at a federal women's prison in Alderson, W.Va., the place to which she had hoped not to be sent. The minimum-security prison in the foothills of the Alleghany Mountains has housed such prominent inmates as the singer Billie Holiday, who was convicted of drug charges, and Lynette "Squeaky" Fromme, a member of the Charles Manson family. It also holds a special place in penal history.
SPORTS
By Paul Sullivan and Paul Sullivan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 5, 2003
CHICAGO - Less than two hours after Major League Baseball announced that no cork had been found in any of his other bats, Sammy Sosa sprinted out of the Wrigley Field dugout last night to an ovation and a smattering of boos. One of the questions surrounding the Chicago Cubs right fielder appeared to have been answered: Most of his fans still love him. But a bigger question remained for the team and for its 34-year-old superstar: The length of his expected suspension for using an illegally altered bat in Tuesday night's game.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2001
Major League Baseball vice president Sandy Alderson came out looking like the villain in the strike zone controversy that flared up between MLB and the umpires union, but the issue turned out to be more about semantics than substance. Alderson's attempt to get umpires to call more strikes was consistent with his crusade to standardize the strike zone - which is a noble quest - but his method of determining who was correctly enforcing his strike zone directive left him open to the charge that he was improperly trying to manipulate the game.
SPORTS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 14, 2001
This season's strike zone seems to be causing more conflict between the umpires and Major League Baseball officials than between umpires and players. Umpires are outraged over instructions that have come to some of them in the past 10 days via e-mail and telephone calls from Sandy Alderson, baseball's chief of operations, two persons who had been told by umpires said yesterday. Alderson said that either the messages had been misinterpreted or the reaction "is all part of a political agenda that some people have," stemming from the bitter feelings between two factions of umpires over which union would represent them.
SPORTS
May 8, 2001
Runs per game -10.6% April 2000, 10.75; April 2001, 9.61 Batting average -3.7% April 2000, .270; April 2001, .260 Home runs per game -8.6% April 2000, 2.56; April 2001, 2.34 Earned run average -9.5%M April 2000, 4.96; April 2001, 4.46 Strikeouts per game +5.4% April 2000, 12.91; April 2001, 13.61 Walks per game -13.3% April 2000, 7.82; April 2001, 6.78 Length of game -2.2% April 2000, 2.58; April 2001, 2.54 Throughout his crusade to...
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK and PETER SCHMUCK,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2001
Major League Baseball executive vice president Sandy Alderson is a bespectacled guy who wears loafers and plaid shirts and looks more like a laid-back college type than the engineer of an aggressive drive to change the way baseball is played in the 21st century. Obviously, appearances can be deceiving. Commissioner Bud Selig may be the point man for baseball ownership, but Alderson is the nuts-and-bolts guy who is responsible for many of the noticeable differences in the sport this season.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal and Ken Rosenthal,Evening Sun Staff | October 22, 1990
Orioles decide not to renew pitcher Joe Price's contract; interest expressed in Von Hayes, Mike Greenwell. Page E10.OAKLAND, Calif. -- The Oakland A's were a team designed to withstand the baseball equivalent of an earthquake. But twice in three years they've crumbled under the force of a World Series tremor. At what point do you fault the construction?That question might sound unduly harsh for a team that has won three straight American League championships, but the A's goal this season was a second straight World Series title.
SPORTS
By Paul Sullivan and Paul Sullivan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 5, 2003
CHICAGO - Less than two hours after Major League Baseball announced that no cork had been found in any of his other bats, Sammy Sosa sprinted out of the Wrigley Field dugout last night to an ovation and a smattering of boos. One of the questions surrounding the Chicago Cubs right fielder appeared to have been answered: Most of his fans still love him. But a bigger question remained for the team and for its 34-year-old superstar: The length of his expected suspension for using an illegally altered bat in Tuesday night's game.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2001
VERO BEACH, Fla. - For much of the past decade, the strike zone was a lot like the weather. Everybody liked to talk about it, but nobody ever really did anything about it. It got shorter and wider. Games got longer and longer. The theoretical rectangle that frames the duel between pitcher and batter strayed so far from the parameters outlined in the official baseball rule book that Major League Baseball executive vice president Sandy Alderson finally put his foot down. He has directed umpires to raise the upper limit of the strike zone, perhaps hoping that it will lead to a more consistent interpretation throughout the American and National leagues and also improve the pace of games.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | December 13, 2000
DALLAS - Baseball's winter meetings may be remembered for the huge contracts signed by Alex Rodriguez and Mike Hampton, but the event that figures to have the most impact on the 2001 season didn't involve any players. Major League Baseball brought together the managers and umpires for a lengthy meeting Sunday to discuss implementing a big change in the strike zone. MLB executive vice president Sandy Alderson has ordered umpires to call the strike zone outlined in the official baseball rule book, which would be a major departure from the way it has been interpreted by umpires for many years.
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