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By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,nicole.fuller@baltsun.com | December 28, 2008
As city leaders begin work on the budget process amid a bleak economic situation, two of its aldermen are pushing for a hiring freeze across Annapolis government. David H. Cordle Sr. and Frederick M. Paone, the city's Republican aldermen, introduced a resolution calling for a hiring freeze at least week's meeting and also requested a report on the city's contractual employees. "What we're doing right now is expanding city government," Cordle said. "The mayor's hired a number of people, and she's trying to paint this rosy picture.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
Two Annapolis aldermen are asking their city council colleagues to denounce the views of a candidate for County Council - even though the candidate is running for a district that doesn't include Annapolis. Alderman Kenny Kirby and Alderwoman Sheila Finlayson, both Democrats, will introduce a resolution at Monday night's city council meeting regarding Republican Anne Arundel County Council candidate Michael Anthony Peroutka and what they say are his "extremist views on civil rights and public education.
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NEWS
By Amy Oakes and Amy Oakes,SUN STAFF | December 9, 1999
A group of Annapolis aldermen interested in what the public thinks about the proposed demolition of seven possibly historic buildings along West Street will hold a public work session Monday and has invited preservationists, residents and business owners to attend."
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2012
The Annapolis mayor and city council are tasked with enforcing residency requirements for the city's elected officials and would be required to vote unanimously in order to remove a sitting alderman found in violation of those requirements, according to an opinion issued by the city attorney. The eight-page opinion, issued late Monday by Karen M. Hardwick, offers guidance on the law regarding residency qualifications for members of the Annapolis council. The opinion came at the request of Mayor Joshua J. Cohen, following inquiries from members of the public regarding the legal residence of Alderman Kenneth A. Kirby, a Ward 6 Democrat.
NEWS
By Scott Wilson and Scott Wilson,SUN STAFF | January 14, 1997
In a rare act of political sacrifice, the Annapolis city council voted unanimously last night to hand over the bulk of its power to an unelected bureaucrat charged with bringing order to an unruly municipal operation.Also, council members voted 8-1 to make it easier for voters to punish them for poor performance through special recall elections. But they killed legislation that would have prohibited aldermen from meddling in the daily operation of city affairs."With this measure, we are effectively changing the form of government we have," said Alderman Dean L. Johnson, a Ward 2 independent who plans a run for mayor.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,Sun Staff Writer | July 25, 1995
Some Annapolis aldermen accused the city government last night of flip-flopping its rules on 2 a.m. closing times for downtown restaurants, most recently when it allowed the Harbour House to be sold with that privilege."
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | February 9, 1997
It was the good government bill that was -- and then it wasn't.It began with complaints from citizens and city department heads about Annapolis city council members meddling and throwing their weight around. By September, five aldermen rushed in with a proposed charter amendment banning such interference in the orderly workings of government.But when it came time to vote that legislation into law last month, the bill's supporters inexplicably faded. Of nine aldermen, only three -- and none of the five sponsors -- voted for the measure.
NEWS
June 24, 1996
ANNAPOLIS RESIDENTS have a new way of contacting some of their elected officials. Six of the nine aldermen now have laptop computers and are reachable through the Internet. Not Mayor Alfred A. Hopkins, though. "I just don't like to deal with people electronically," he says. "I'd rather talk to them face-to-face."Internet access does not necessarily mean better governance. But it is good for citizens to know that they can address their concerns -- at length -- to decision-makers at all hours of the day without having to leave cryptic telephone messages.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | July 7, 1997
A decade-old Annapolis law that forbids city aldermen from receiving fringe benefits is obsolete, state officials say, clearing the way for the part-time council members to qualify for a pension.The state's personnel and pension laws supersede the 1988 city law, officials from the State Retirement and Pension System said recently.City lawyers agreed Thursday, saying: "The city cannot deny elected officials from participating in the pension plan."But for aldermen to be eligible to collect benefits, the city would have to pay as much as $28,000 to the state system to bring current pensions for aldermen up to date, according to city Administrator John L. Prehn Jr.The figure is "a very rough calculation" that city officials "might say our budget cannot possibly afford," Prehn said.
NEWS
July 8, 1997
PART-TIME WORKERS employed twice a month for a couple of hours each time would be laughed out of their bosses' office if they demanded pensions.Members of the Annapolis City Council apparently feel no shame, however, in considering legislation that would give them retirement benefits for their jobs, which city law describes as part-time in nature.Although state law has since superseded a 1988 Annapolis law prohibiting elected officials from participating in public pension plans, it would be absurd for the council to set up a pension system for itself.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,nicole.fuller@baltsun.com | June 28, 2009
The Annapolis city council has delayed by a month an increase in monthly parking fees at four city-owned parking facilities after facing an outcry from downtown business owners. Fees for monthly parking passes would have increased as much as 60 percent July 1 under a rate plan passed in the city's 2010 budget. The biggest hikes were at the Hillman garage on Duke of Gloucester near Main Street, which was scheduled to begin charging $240 for a monthly pass, up from $150. The maximum daily charge would rise from $10 to $16. At the Knighton garage on West Street, the hourly rate would increase from $1.25 to $2. Although business owners lobbied the council at a recent meeting to hold off on all of the increases, the council voted unanimously to go forward with all of the scheduled increases except for the monthly passes.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,nicole.fuller@baltsun.com | December 28, 2008
As city leaders begin work on the budget process amid a bleak economic situation, two of its aldermen are pushing for a hiring freeze across Annapolis government. David H. Cordle Sr. and Frederick M. Paone, the city's Republican aldermen, introduced a resolution calling for a hiring freeze at least week's meeting and also requested a report on the city's contractual employees. "What we're doing right now is expanding city government," Cordle said. "The mayor's hired a number of people, and she's trying to paint this rosy picture.
NEWS
By Nia Henderson and Nia Henderson,Sun reporter | May 16, 2007
Annapolis has joined a handful of jurisdictions across the country to officially apologize for its role in the American slave trade. The City Council passed a resolution unanimously Monday, with aldermen Michael Christman and Julie Stankivic abstaining. Sponsored by aldermen Richard Israel and Sam Shropshire, the measure went through substantial revisions, with the final version, drafted by Israel, expressing "profound regret" and recommending that the last week in October be a week for studying slavery.
NEWS
By NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON and NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON,SUN REPORTER | March 3, 2006
An Annapolis city council member's proposal to allow nonprofit organizations to purchase homes or apartments set aside by developers for "work force housing" has spurred a debate over the best way to modify a new city program. Alderwoman Classie Gillis Hoyle has said the amendment would make it easier for residents to ultimately buy homes and would keep moderately priced dwelling units, or MPDUs, on the market for a longer time. "This is an opportunity for a teacher or police officer who might need some extra time to repair their credit or get money together," she said.
NEWS
By NIA MALIKA-HENDERSON and NIA MALIKA-HENDERSON,SUN REPORTER | February 15, 2006
Mayor Ellen O. Moyer and two city council members are seeking a new ordinance they say would crack down on residential landlords who fail to adequately maintain their properties. The measure, prompted by concerns raised by a downtown community group, would clarify landlord responsibilities and tenant rights. "Many of these rental properties are old, and they are conjoined," said Jan Hardesty, a spokeswoman for the mayor's office. "That means when there is any kind of issue, it affects more than one property.
NEWS
By PHILLIP MCGOWAN and PHILLIP MCGOWAN,SUN REPORTER | November 30, 2005
Annapolis will expand to take in 185 acres along Forest Drive, but developers won't be able to build on the properties right away after action by the city council this week. As the council met Monday night for its last session before five incumbents step down next week, it approved two annexations along Forest Drive, as well as a bill that places a development moratorium on annexed property. During a public hearing before the vote, several community leaders said they preferred the original bill - to put a temporary halt on annexation - over the amended version that temporarily prohibits development on newly annexed land until the council can adopt an adequate-public-facilities measure.
NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,Staff writer | July 17, 1991
In an 11th-hour bid to stop the planned 80-foot-high Severn River Bridge, the Annapolis City Council is taking its battle to Congress, a presidential advisory panel and possibly the courts.The council decided Monday night to ask Representative Tom McMillen, D-4th, and Maryland's two senators to look into whether the state could kill the high bridge without losing $32 million in federal money.But a spokesman for McMillen offered little hope yesterday that any of the money could be salvaged if the state were to scrap the highbridge.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN STAFF | January 22, 1996
After postponing meetings twice because of the weather, the Annapolis city council finally will take action on a wide range of issues tonight, from the future of a Victorian house to buying computers.Aldermen will vote on a zoning change that would allow the Naval Academy Alumni Association to convert a Victorian house it owns at 49 College Ave. into an alumni fund-raising center.The association has its Alumni House headquarters in a historic mansion, at King George Street and College Avenue, and wants to convert the 49 College Ave. property into offices with a garden to be used for entertaining.
NEWS
By BRADLEY OLSON and BRADLEY OLSON,SUN REPORTER | November 16, 2005
At their second-to-last city council meeting, outgoing Annapolis Alderwomen Louise Hammond and Sheila M. Tolliver showed they will go out not with a whisper, but a bang. Hammond and Tolliver, both Democrats, repeatedly questioned returning council members about their support for legislation about the Market House lease, mixed-use zoning along West Street, annexation moratoriums and a lease to the Annapolis Maritime Museum during Monday night's meeting. For nearly every vote that broached a controversial subject, Hammond, Tolliver and Republican Alderman George O. Kelley Sr. - none of whom will return when a new council takes over Dec. 12 - raised questions about how the incoming council will change the balance of power in city government.
NEWS
By ANNIE LINSKEY and ANNIE LINSKEY,SUN REPORTER | November 11, 2005
Annapolis voters this week elected five new members to the city council, drastically changing the shape of the nine-person legislative body. Mayor Ellen O. Moyer's three most vocal critics will be replaced Dec. 5 by friendlier - or at least newer - faces. Also, the council will include only two Republicans, one fewer than the current council. The lack of strong critics, the inexperience of many of the new aldermen with city government and the Democratic dominance have led some to speculate that the new council will be little more than a rubber stamp for the mayor's policies.
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