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By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | May 14, 1998
A middle-aged computer analyst related a string of personal woes to the circle of 16 people recovering from what they said were patterns of self-destructive behavior.His problem is compulsive anger, expressed over the slightest things. He would say mean things to those around him and maybe throw things. He had been trying to remain calm over recent setbacks but the ugly anger was returning. He said he needed help.His listeners are used to baring their souls. The colleagues say they ate too much, ate too little, got too angry, worked too much, became too anxious and became too controlling or too meek in relationships.
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NEWS
January 18, 2014
Bravo to Mike Gimbel for his recent letter against legalizing marijuana in Maryland ("Say no to legalized pot," Jan. 11). I have worked in the health care and social services field for the past 14 years, and he is spot on. Many adults who smoke pot started as teens or younger, and the pot wreaks havoc on their developmental stages and mind/body changes through their teens and into their 20s. Pot smoking accounts for their lack of initiative, lethargy...
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FEATURES
June 10, 2006
Almanac-- June 10-- 1935: Alcoholics Anonymous was founded in Akron, Ohio. 1946: Italy replaced its abolished monarchy with a republic.
EXPLORE
January 24, 2013
These groups meet regularly. Abusive relationships - Mondays, 7-8:30 p.m. Domestic Violence Center of Howard County, 5457 Twin Knolls Road, Suite 310, Columbia. Free child care. 410-997-0304. Adult Children of Alcoholics - Wednesdays, 7 p.m., First Presbyterian Church of Howard County, 9325 Presbyterian Circle, Columbia; Saturdays, 12:45 p.m., Serenity Center, 9650 Basket Ring Road, Columbia. 410-796-4680. Alcoholics Anonymous - Sundays, 7 p.m. Share experience, strength and hope with each other to solve this common problem and help others to recover.
FEATURES
By Orlando Sentinel | January 20, 1993
"I'm good enough, I'm smart enough, and doggone it, people like me!"Anyone who watches "Saturday Night Live" will recognize those stirring words as the mantra of Stuart Smalley, the coifed, co-dependent character invented by comedian Al Franken.For three years now, Mr. Franken has starred in a "SNL" skit called "Daily Affirmations With Stuart Smalley," in which Stuart, a creature of the recovery movement -- the vast array of 12-step programs based on Alcoholics Anonymous -- looks lovingly into a mirror and mouths the affirmations that remind him he's really OK.Now those words are also the title of a book by Mr. Franken.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 11, 2007
The federal appeals court in San Francisco upheld yesterday a death sentence from a jury that had consulted the Bible's teachings on capital punishment. In a second decision on the role of religion in the criminal justice system, the same court ruled Friday that requiring a former prisoner on parole to attend meetings of Alcoholics Anonymous violated the First Amendment's ban on government establishment of religion. In the case decided yesterday, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals split 9-6 on the question of whether notes, including Bible verses prepared by the jury's foreman and used during sentencing deliberations, required the reversal of the death sentence imposed on Stevie L. Fields in 1979.
NEWS
December 11, 2002
George J. Gibmeyer Sr., a retired Anne Arundel County police sergeant, died Thursday of complications from a stroke at a nursing home in Vero Beach, Fla. The former Glen Burnie resident was 71. He had moved to Vero Beach in 1991, when he retired from the county police force. During his 26-year career, he had assignments on patrol in the Northern District and working in the 911 Center in Millersville. Born in Baltimore and raised on North Belnord Avenue, Mr. Gibmeyer was a 1948 graduate of Mount St. Joseph High School.
NEWS
February 3, 1991
Here is a list of other support groups in Anne Arundel County: SUNDAY * Metaphysical Support Group -- For people seeking a support groupto help them in life after attending a 12-step program or Forum, Lifespring, Inward Bound or Insight. Information: 760-1546, 969-7919 or 944-4542.* Psychiatric Support -- Open to all area residents with psychiatric problems, as well as families and friends of psychiatric patients or anyone interested in mental illness. Information: 787-4628.* Alcoholics Anonymous -- For alcoholics.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff writer | March 17, 1991
The Rev. Nick McDonald, pastor of the Deer Creek Episcopal Parish, sees two Darlingtons.In one Darlington, historic houses and thriving farms line the village's main roads.In the other Darlington, families cope with a history of drug andalcohol abuse, many living in poverty, McDonald said."Everybody thinks Darlington is beautiful and pastoral," McDonald said. "But there's a lot of rural poverty. That's a part of Darlington nobody ever sees. We just don't talk a lot about it, but we know it's out there."
NEWS
By Ingrid Hansen and Ingrid Hansen,Contributing writer | January 17, 1992
Coordinating an alcoholism support group in Anne Arundel County isn't easy, as Joan Urbus found out.Especially when no one shows up.But Urbus, who recently attempted to form a Women For Sobriety group in Pasadena two weeks ago, wasn't surprised."
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2011
The motto of the Helping Up Mission is "serving the broken men of Baltimore. " Each night, about 50 to 60 men walk through the shelter's doors on East Baltimore Street at Exeter Street in Jonestown. There are bunk beds available, as well as a meal, medical treatment and laundry facilities. But that is only part of the story. Most new arrivals are battling alcohol and drug addictions. They can stay longer if they commit to turning their lives around and getting sober. Many do. The Helping Up Mission houses an additional 350 men in its long-term program.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | October 12, 2008
Julia M. "Julie" Conquest, a former Roland Park resident who owned and operated a Chestertown boutique, died Wednesday of pneumonia at Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon, N.H. She was 87. Julia Muse Henry was born in Cambridge and, after the death of her parents when she was 6, moved to Philadelphia, where she was raised by relatives. She attended Goucher College and was married in the late 1940s to Pleasonton L. Conquest III, a Baltimore stockbroker, who died in 1979. During the 1960s, she worked as a secretary in the physics department at the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 11, 2007
The federal appeals court in San Francisco upheld yesterday a death sentence from a jury that had consulted the Bible's teachings on capital punishment. In a second decision on the role of religion in the criminal justice system, the same court ruled Friday that requiring a former prisoner on parole to attend meetings of Alcoholics Anonymous violated the First Amendment's ban on government establishment of religion. In the case decided yesterday, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals split 9-6 on the question of whether notes, including Bible verses prepared by the jury's foreman and used during sentencing deliberations, required the reversal of the death sentence imposed on Stevie L. Fields in 1979.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | August 4, 2006
James William Houck Sr., a retired electrical engineer and salesman who as a recovering alcoholic befriended the founder of Alcoholics Anonymous and preached clean living throughout his life, died of complications related to old age Sunday at the College Manor nursing home in Lutherville. He was 100. Born in Walkersville, he was a 1925 graduate of Frederick High School, where he played on a state championship basketball team and was an Eagle Scout. Mr. Houck recounted for The Sun in 1999 that he had started drinking at age 5 "when I got into my mother's dandelion wine, and I drank all the way through high school and college."
FEATURES
June 10, 2006
Almanac-- June 10-- 1935: Alcoholics Anonymous was founded in Akron, Ohio. 1946: Italy replaced its abolished monarchy with a republic.
NEWS
December 11, 2002
George J. Gibmeyer Sr., a retired Anne Arundel County police sergeant, died Thursday of complications from a stroke at a nursing home in Vero Beach, Fla. The former Glen Burnie resident was 71. He had moved to Vero Beach in 1991, when he retired from the county police force. During his 26-year career, he had assignments on patrol in the Northern District and working in the 911 Center in Millersville. Born in Baltimore and raised on North Belnord Avenue, Mr. Gibmeyer was a 1948 graduate of Mount St. Joseph High School.
NEWS
February 3, 1991
The following support groups are sponsored by Harbor Hospital Center:* Alcoholics Anonymous -- meets Friday and Sunday evenings at the hospital. Information: 347-2544.* Bereavement Counseling -- meets when needed by the hospital's Pastoral Care Division. Information: 347-3487.* Coronary Club -- ongoing group for former cardiac patients, their families and friendsmeets in the hospital's Gruehn Building. Information: 347-3533.*Freedom From Smoking -- seven-session program offered at regular interviews to help people quit smoking.
NEWS
April 17, 1991
Services for the Rev. Richard H. Ogle IV, retired pastor of the Perkins Square Baptist Church, will be held at 11 a.m. today at the church at 2500 Edmondson Ave.Mr. Ogle, who was 48 and lived on Edmondson Avenue, died Friday at St. Agnes Hospital after a long illness.He retired in December after serving as pastor of the church for 18 years. He became associate pastor of the church of which he had been a member in the late 1960s.Born in Baltimore, he was a graduate of the Carver Vocational-Technical High School and attended the Center of Truth School of Religion and Howard University.
NEWS
March 16, 2001
Democratic Rep. Elijah Cummings of Baltimore recently spoke at The Sun with Richard C. Gross, editor of the Opinion * Commentary page, about Baltimore's needs and how the state and Congress might fill some of them. You said the state isn't doing enough for Baltimore. What should it be doing? One of the things the state has to do is give more money for drug treatment. Baltimore is definitely a city that's on the move, and we are getting stronger every day. But we can get stronger faster if the state gave more with regard to drug treatment and helped us make sure that those drug treatment dollars work for or are used to provide the most effective treatment.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 30, 1999
Anne B. Packard, whose pioneering work with female alcoholics brought her wide acclaim, died Sunday from complications of an infection at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. She was 79 and lived in the Hampton section of Baltimore County.A recovering alcoholic who had celebrated 41 years of sobriety at the time of her death, Mrs. Packard became involved with Alcoholics Anonymous in 1957."When she joined AA in those days, it was pretty much a male bastion because they didn't want women to be a part of the group," said Pam M., also a recovering alcoholic and AA member.
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