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By Holly Selby | December 27, 2007
Just about anyone who has attended a too-rowdy party knows the scene: Someone begins drinking and doesn't know when to stop. Rambunctious behavior, slurred words, an uneven gait and sometimes even unconsciousness follows. While drinking in moderation can be pleasurable, drinking too much can lead to alcohol poisoning, a severe and potentially fatal reaction to an overdose. Too much alcohol can shut down parts of the brain that control the gag reflex (which prevents choking) and breathing, says McRae Williams, an emergency-room physician at Greater Baltimore Medical Center.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | July 10, 2014
Excessive drinking accounts for 10 percent of deaths among working-age adults, making it the leading cause of preventable death of Americans, according to new research from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention . The alcohol use killed about 88,000 people aged 20 to 64 a year from 2006 to 2010, shortening their lives by about 30 years. They died from health effects including breast cancer, liver disease and heart disease, as well as from violence, alcohol poisoning and car crashes.
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NEWS
October 24, 1995
Three Millersville youths were treated for alcohol poisoning Saturday after they drank brandy provided by a 24-year-old man, county police said yesterday.One, a 16-year-old girl, was released from North Arundel Hospital yesterday. The others, a 16-year-old boy, of the 700 block of Crucible Court, and a 15-year-old girl, of the 600 block of Cog Court, were treated at North Arundel and released Saturday.Police said a resident of Cog Court called them about 4 p.m. Saturday to report that he saw a girl lying in the roadway.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2014
Maryland senators will resume debate Wednesday on whether to outlaw the sale of grain alcohol, a colorless spirit so potent the chamber voted to ban it twice before. More than a dozen other states already forbid the sale of the 190-proof liquor, according to state analysts. The proposal has died in the House of Delegates in the past, but was revived with a new lawmakers pushing it this year. On Tuesday, the Senate took up the question of whether its prevalence on college campuses contributed to alcohol poisoning, and whether banning it would hurt small businesses that sell it. Democrat Sen. Rich Madaleno of Montgomery County said the president of Frostburg State University asked him to introduce the bill to ban substance, which is nearly pure alcohol, because of the problems it creates at colleges.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | September 7, 2001
COLLEGE PARK - Police ruled out foul play yesterday in the death of a University of Maryland junior Wednesday morning and said that a preliminary autopsy showed it was "highly unlikely" that he died of alcohol poisoning. But the cause of Alexander Eugene Klochkoff's death remains unclear, police said. They are waiting for the results of toxicology tests, which could take at least two weeks. The police statements put an end to some of the speculation that has dominated the campus since the 20-year-old from North Bellmore, N.Y., was found on the front porch of his Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity house about 8 a.m. Wednesday.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 9, 2002
EMMITSBURG - Four Mount St. Mary's College students were hospitalized over the weekend with symptoms of alcohol poisoning, college officials said yesterday. The students - whose names and ages were not divulged - were taken Saturday night from campus dormitories to hospitals in Frederick and Gettysburg, Pa., said college spokesman Duffy Ross. He said college officials were investigating where the students had been drinking. On Saturday night, the college held its Christmas dance, a longstanding tradition at the 1,400-student Catholic school in Emmitsburg.
NEWS
By Meredith Schlow and Meredith Schlow,Evening Sun Staff | August 15, 1991
The name of the game is "Party Till You Puke."But teen-agers who lose may pay with their lives.That's the message that the Baltimore County Underage Drinking Committee wants to get across to secondary school kids who drink."
NEWS
By New York Times | December 31, 1991
BLACKSBURG, Va. -- Drinking among college students has declined over the past decade, studies show, as society has grown less tolerant of alcohol. But that decline masks a trend that is proving both stubborn and lethal: the persistence of abusive or "binge" drinking."
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2014
Maryland senators will resume debate Wednesday on whether to outlaw the sale of grain alcohol, a colorless spirit so potent the chamber voted to ban it twice before. More than a dozen other states already forbid the sale of the 190-proof liquor, according to state analysts. The proposal has died in the House of Delegates in the past, but was revived with a new lawmakers pushing it this year. On Tuesday, the Senate took up the question of whether its prevalence on college campuses contributed to alcohol poisoning, and whether banning it would hurt small businesses that sell it. Democrat Sen. Rich Madaleno of Montgomery County said the president of Frostburg State University asked him to introduce the bill to ban substance, which is nearly pure alcohol, because of the problems it creates at colleges.
NEWS
By Young Chang and Young Chang,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | March 29, 1999
People interested in participating in a national alcoholism screening project will be able to do so at a dozen Baltimore-area sites April 8. The National Mental Illness Screening Project Inc., a nonprofit organization, has set up testing at 1,700 locations for National Alcohol Screening Day. The program is open to all ages, but organizers want to focus on college students who are susceptible to binge drinking and alcohol poisoning. Five hundred of the 1,700 sites are colleges.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2012
They have asked a date, found the perfect dress, matched the shoes and made the appointments for hair and nails. But the seniors and their parents at Maryvale Preparatory School must add one more thing to their to-do list before prom night Friday. The all-girls Catholic school in Brooklandville established an unusual pre-prom tradition 26 years ago, when it made an alcohol education program mandatory for students and parents. "Because of all the things going on related to drinking, including a horrific accident, we decided then that we had to do something," said Sister Shawn Marie Maguire, who has overseen the school since 1981.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2012
Michael Thomas Truluck, 13, texted his family that he needed a ride home shortly before 6 p.m. Saturday. His mother said she saw nothing unusual in the request and sent her fiance to pick up Michael and two other boys, who had spent the afternoon together. "I knew he was hanging out with a bunch of friends, and there was nothing unusual about that," Kristina Keys said. "He texted and asked for a ride home. We picked him and two friends up. " Keys said she had no idea that his Saturday afternoon, which usually included lunch at a fast-food restaurant and hoops at Double Rock Park in Parkville, involved drinking an alcohol-laced energy drink, which an unidentified adult purchased for the pre-teens.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | November 17, 2010
Maryland's two largest alcohol trade groups instructed their members Wednesday to stop selling alcoholic drinks infused with caffeine, a voluntary move to counter what Comptroller Peter Franchot called "a clear public health and safety threat. " The agreement followed bans by several states of drinks such as Four Loko, increasingly popular among young drinkers for inducing a state that senior Food and Drug Administration official Dr. Joshua M. Sharfstein described as "wide-awake drunk.
FEATURES
By Sam Sessa and Julie Scharper and Sam Sessa and Julie Scharper,sam.sessa@baltsun.com | August 31, 2009
Nearly everything about yesterday's Virgin Mobile FreeFest was smaller than in previous years. The location, Merriweather Post Pavilion, was about half the size of Pimlico Race Course. The festival was scaled back from a weekend-long spectacle to a one-day event. Even the traditionally diverse lineup was pared down to include mostly rock bands and DJs. But this year's festival, which featured headliners Blink-182, Weezer and Franz Ferdinand, was free. And free goes a long way. As a result, tickets went fast, and tens of thousands of energetic fans flooded Merriweather for the festival.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | December 27, 2007
Just about anyone who has attended a too-rowdy party knows the scene: Someone begins drinking and doesn't know when to stop. Rambunctious behavior, slurred words, an uneven gait and sometimes even unconsciousness follows. While drinking in moderation can be pleasurable, drinking too much can lead to alcohol poisoning, a severe and potentially fatal reaction to an overdose. Too much alcohol can shut down parts of the brain that control the gag reflex (which prevents choking) and breathing, says McRae Williams, an emergency-room physician at Greater Baltimore Medical Center.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 9, 2002
EMMITSBURG - Four Mount St. Mary's College students were hospitalized over the weekend with symptoms of alcohol poisoning, college officials said yesterday. The students - whose names and ages were not divulged - were taken Saturday night from campus dormitories to hospitals in Frederick and Gettysburg, Pa., said college spokesman Duffy Ross. He said college officials were investigating where the students had been drinking. On Saturday night, the college held its Christmas dance, a longstanding tradition at the 1,400-student Catholic school in Emmitsburg.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | July 10, 2014
Excessive drinking accounts for 10 percent of deaths among working-age adults, making it the leading cause of preventable death of Americans, according to new research from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention . The alcohol use killed about 88,000 people aged 20 to 64 a year from 2006 to 2010, shortening their lives by about 30 years. They died from health effects including breast cancer, liver disease and heart disease, as well as from violence, alcohol poisoning and car crashes.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | September 6, 2001
COLLEGE PARK - Prince George's County police are investigating the death of a 20-year-old University of Maryland student found lying unconscious on the front porch of his Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity house yesterday morning. The student was identified as Alexander Eugene Klochkoff of Bellmore, N.Y. The cause of death had not been determined, authorities said. But there were signs that the death may have been a crime rather than a case of alcohol poisoning, a growing problem on campuses.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | September 7, 2001
COLLEGE PARK - Police ruled out foul play yesterday in the death of a University of Maryland junior Wednesday morning and said that a preliminary autopsy showed it was "highly unlikely" that he died of alcohol poisoning. But the cause of Alexander Eugene Klochkoff's death remains unclear, police said. They are waiting for the results of toxicology tests, which could take at least two weeks. The police statements put an end to some of the speculation that has dominated the campus since the 20-year-old from North Bellmore, N.Y., was found on the front porch of his Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity house about 8 a.m. Wednesday.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | September 6, 2001
COLLEGE PARK - Prince George's County police are investigating the death of a 20-year-old University of Maryland student found lying unconscious on the front porch of his Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity house yesterday morning. The student was identified as Alexander Eugene Klochkoff of Bellmore, N.Y. The cause of death had not been determined, authorities said. But there were signs that the death may have been a crime rather than a case of alcohol poisoning, a growing problem on campuses.
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