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NEWS
February 15, 2012
There are may lessons to be learned from the case of George Huguely and Yeardley Love ("Teammates saw signs of trouble, but failed to act," Feb. 10). Among them is that alcoholism and aggression are real issues that need to be addressed. We all know that alcohol changes the brain, causing some to react in violent ways. For those with prior anger issues, the violence likely intensifies with the addition of alcohol and other substances. Mr. Huguely had consumed 15 drinks on the day of the incident, and other testimony suggests he suffered from anger issues.
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich and The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2014
Olympic swimming champion Michael Phelps plans to enter a six-week in-patient treatment program after his recent drunken-driving arrest, he and his agent said Sunday. The move should help his legal case and boost his public image as he seeks to keep a swimming comeback alive, legal and sports experts said. In statements on social media Sunday morning, Phelps told his fans that he plans to take time off to "attend a program" and focus on his personal life. "I recognize that this is not my first lapse in judgment, and I am extremely disappointed with myself," said Phelps, the most decorated Olympian in history.
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HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker | January 24, 2012
Singer Mario knows from first-hand experience how it is to grow up with a parent with substance abuse problems and now he wants to use what he knows to help other kids. The Baltimore native, whose mother has suffered from drug abuse for years, is using his non-profit to help prevent substance abuse in middle and high school students in the Baltimore area. The Mario Do Right Foundation will house the program at the REACH! School, a Baltimore school that focuses on getting kids into college.
NEWS
September 14, 2014
What I saw in the Ray and Janay Rice elevator tape was a man who was intoxicated and whose judgment was impaired ( "NFL investigation into Ray Rice video raises more questions ," Sept. 11). He was probably too drunk to lift his wife out of the elevator. Clearly, alcohol abuse can lead to domestic violence. But on the basis of one incident we do not strip a man of his humanity and throw the "domestic violence" playbook at him for all time. Relationships must be judged on an individual basis.
HEALTH
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2012
There's little question that George Huguely V, the former University of Virginia student on trial for murder, had a problem with alcohol. He had been arrested twice for drinking-related infractions, one of them violent, in his early 20s. And he admits to consuming at least 15 drinks - and likely had more, witnesses said - the day he confronted Yeardley Love at her off-campus apartment in 2010, assaulting her so severely she later died, according to...
NEWS
February 24, 2012
After reading all the coverage of George Huguely's murder trial, I feel compelled to write. All the focus on this horrible event has shown just how ignorant society is about alcoholism and its effects on the drinker and the family and friends who surround that person. Alcoholism is a disease. Expecting a parent or worse yet a group of 20-somethings to handle another person's alcoholism is like expecting them to provide a cure for a friend with cancer. It can't be done. Jean Marbella wrote on Sunday that "Huguely wasn't drinking in a celebratory fashion.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green | October 29, 2013
A new report has found that about 19 percent of underage and 22 percent of college students ages 21 to 24 in Maryland show signs of alcohol abuse or dependency. The report was done by a collaborative of Maryland's higher education institutions that have joined forces to address excessive drinking in college. The University System of Maryland and the Bloomberg School of Public Health at the Johns Hopkins University have formed a coalition of 10 college presidents from across the state to establish the Maryland Collaborative to Reduce College Drinking and Related Practices.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,Sun Staff | February 27, 2005
Smashed: Story of a Drunken Girlhood By Koren Zailckas. Viking. 343 pages. $21.95. She doesn't remember her first kiss but Koren Zailckas can recall with elaborate detail the very afternoon, when at 14 and still in eighth grade, she took her first sip of alcohol. It was a Friday -- June 17, 1994, to be exact -- and the Southern Comfort bottle resembled something her grandfather might drink. The liquid inside smelled sweet, and tasted terrible. But it was her initiation to a ubiquitous social drug that would both prop her up and, ultimately, bring her down.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 16, 2000
"TYING ONE ON" will take on a new meaning at Carroll Community College this week as students, faculty and staff members commemorate National Collegiate Alcohol Awareness Week with a variety of activities. The week, sponsored by BACCHUS groups at schools across the country, is meant to help college students think before they drink or use drugs. BACCHUS - an acronym for Boosting Alcohol Consciousness Concerning the Health of University Students - enlists students to help educate their peers about the dangers of drug and alcohol abuse.
NEWS
By CATHERINE GIRA | March 23, 1997
In November 1996, a 21-year-old freshman at Frostburg State University died of alcohol poisoning after attending an off-campus party. Eight students accused of selling him the liquor have been charged with manslaughter.On Feb. 9, 1997, a 17-year-old freshman at a university in upstate New York died of alcohol poisoning at a fraternity rush event. Twelve students have been charged in his death.Two summers ago, a 15-year-old boy from the South, visiting Ocean City, consumed a lethal amount of alcohol at a teen-age party and died.
NEWS
By Richard S. Madaleno Jr | August 4, 2014
Excessive drinking among college students is a public health problem that is larger than just the colleges and universities. It is a problem for our entire state. The more than 270,000 students attending college in Maryland comprise a large and critical segment of our future workforce. This is why I was proud to work with the leadership and staff of the Maryland Collaborative to Reduce College Drinking and Related Problems this legislative session to ban the sale of extreme-strength "grain" alcohol.
NEWS
August 3, 2014
I have to agree with commentator Jacob Simpson's take on the Ray Rice's domestic violence case ( "Ray Rice is not a victim," July 31). As a 60-year-old survivor of a 13-year relationship where the violence escalated from verbal to physical abuse, I remember each time I was attacked my partner screamed: "Why do you do this? Why do you push my buttons? Why do you have to be such a [expletive]!" All abusers blame the victim. The attacks on me were perpetuated by alcohol abuse, and 99 percent of the time all I did was ask a question or make a statement - which in his mind meant I had it coming.
NEWS
By Michelle Minton | July 30, 2014
This month, Maryland banned high-proof liquors like Everclear and other inexpensive tipples . Self-proclaimed public health activists claimed such "high octane" liquors increased the likelihood of binge-drinking and sexual assaults on college campuses. While the merits of the ban are debatable, one aspect of it is not: the use of taxpayer money to support a political agenda.   The "grain alcohol ban" was backed by the Maryland Collaborative to Reduce College Drinking and Related Problems, a coalition of researchers and administrators at 10 Maryland colleges and universities.
NEWS
May 15, 2014
A public policy that regulates and controls marijuana will likely make it easier, not harder, for parents and educators to rationally and persuasively discuss this subject with young people ( "Teens want real talk about pot," May 12). After all, many parents who may have experimented with cannabis during their youth - or who continue to indulge occasionally - will no longer feel the social and legal pressures to lie to their children about their own behavior. Rather, just as many parents presently speak to their children openly about their use of alcohol - instructing them that booze may be appropriate for adults in moderation but that it remains inappropriate for young people - legalization will unburden parents so that they can talk objectively and rationally to their kids about marijuana.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, Carrie Wells and Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2014
Grain alcohol, the cheap, potent booze that has been a staple at college parties for generations, could be outlawed in Maryland as university presidents press lawmakers to ban it. Maryland senators voted Wednesday to forbid the sale of grain alcohol that's at least 190-proof, which contains 95 percent alcohol. A key committee chairman expects to move the bill to the full House of Delegates for a vote, giving the bill its best shot at passage in years. Sometimes marketed as moonshine, colorless grain alcohol can be twice as strong as vodka and has been outlawed in at least a dozen other states.
NEWS
December 9, 2013
Betty Buck missed a great opportunity with her commentary ("The failed experiment of Prohibition," Dec. 5). While there are plenty of things learned from Prohibition, I found her offering to reveal none of them and that instead it was a nice, but poorly disguised, pat on her organization's back. Her organization, the Maryland Beer Wholesalers Association, probably has more interest in keeping the status quo than fighting alcohol abuse, unsafe alcohol, decreased respect for the law and other things mentioned.
NEWS
By Richard S. Madaleno Jr | August 4, 2014
Excessive drinking among college students is a public health problem that is larger than just the colleges and universities. It is a problem for our entire state. The more than 270,000 students attending college in Maryland comprise a large and critical segment of our future workforce. This is why I was proud to work with the leadership and staff of the Maryland Collaborative to Reduce College Drinking and Related Problems this legislative session to ban the sale of extreme-strength "grain" alcohol.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | May 30, 1999
Carroll County kids -- the first 100 who sign up -- will have the opportunity to learn about drug and alcohol abuse from a police perspective this summer at Camp COPS.The free program, set for July 12-16 at the Carroll County Farm Museum in Westminster, aims to provide soon-to-be seventh-graders a healthy dose of physical activity within a police-academy atmosphere, says Tfc. Wendy Bernhardt, camp director.COPS -- Courage to be Outstanding with Pride and Self-confidence -- places emphasis on self-discipline and teamwork.
NEWS
By Betty Buck | December 4, 2013
Every day, Maryland beer distributors safely and efficiently deliver thousands of labels of beer to local retail stores, restaurants and bars for Marylanders to purchase and enjoy - from the Baltimore Harbor to the Eastern Shore to the Washington Metropolitan Area. But the success of our local businesses today results from lessons learned years ago when this nation banned alcohol, drove it underground and released a torrent of unintended consequences. On Thursday, while many prepare for holiday festivities, we celebrate another milestone in our country's history: the 80th anniversary of the repeal of Prohibition.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold, The Baltimore Sun | November 12, 2013
Starting in December, gay, bisexual and transgender Marylanders recovering from substance abuse will be able to receive LGBT-focused resources and services at Baltimore's LGBT community center. Through a partnership with Maryland RecoveryNet, a federally-funded initiative meant to increase access to support services for those recovering from drug addiction, the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Community Center of Baltimore and Central Maryland (GLCCB) will begin providing LGBT-focused recovery support services.
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