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NEWS
August 25, 2012
It is refreshing to see a politician admit his mistakes, take full responsibility for them and ask for forgiveness ("Dwyer admits to drinking in boating accident," Aug. 24). As they return to school this month, may our youth learn from the events of this past week - the teenagers who died in the Ellicott City train derailment and Del. Donald H. Dwyer's boating accident - that alcohol use compromises one's judgment. Benedict Frederick Jr., Pasadena
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Jean Marbella, Justin Fenton and Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Red-eyed and slurring his words, Olympic swimmer Michael Phelps had a blood alcohol level of 0.14, well above the state limit of 0.08, when he was arrested and charged with drunken driving Tuesday morning after leaving the Horseshoe Casino in downtown Baltimore, according to court documents. Phelps, 29, failed two roadside sobriety tests and was asked to perform a third involving balancing on one leg, according to the documents, but told the officer, "That's not happening. " The swimmer, who returned to competition last year after retiring in 2012 as the most decorated Olympian of all time, is scheduled for trial on Nov. 19 in Baltimore City District Court.
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SPORTS
July 11, 2010
Two Georgia players were jailed early Saturday morning on alcohol-related charges less than a week after an embarrassing drunken driving arrest prompted university athletic director Damon Evans to resign. Dontavius Jackson , listed as a sophomore tailback, and sophomore split end Tavarres King were in a Chevrolet Avalanche stopped on a campus road just before 3 a.m., UGA Police Chief Jimmy Williamson said. Jackson, 20, was charged with driving under the influence, leaving the scene of an accident and other motor vehicle offenses.
NEWS
Carrie Wells and Alison Knezevich and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
One Towson University student drank so much alcohol he was unable to speak and threw up "without a pause" before passing out outside a nearby apartment complex, according to an anguished email his mother sent to university officials. Another student attempted to drink a bottle of Southern Comfort and ended up in the hospital with a blood alcohol content of 0.34 percent, a level that's life-threatening. In 2012, a rugby club member was so intoxicated he told a dormitory resident assistant that the year was 1993.
NEWS
May 10, 2010
Imagine a world where people drank tea or water or an occasional glass of wine…. Where teenagers, college students and their elders went out for dinner or conversation instead of going "out to drink…" Where drivers were sober and dates weren't passed out, not even knowing they were being raped…. Where jealousies might incite passions but wouldn't be fueled into murderous rages by alcohol… Will people ever learn to avoid drinking and its frequent escalation into being drunk, irresponsible, dangerous, unconscious, dead?
NEWS
March 1, 2011
After reading " 'Dime-a-drink' tax will save lives, not kill jobs " (Feb. 22) by Messrs. Jernigan, Waters and Cook, I'm left wondering: If taxing alcohol will accomplish the two-pronged benefit of raising revenue for the state while curtailing abuse due to reducing consumption, why stop at 10 cents a drink? Why not double the tax? Or triple it? I'm not on the faculty of Johns Hopkins' Bloomberg School of Public Health, nor am I a professor of public policy at Duke University, but I did take logic in college and the writers' argument just doesn't hold water, beer or any other liquid.
NEWS
February 15, 2012
There are may lessons to be learned from the case of George Huguely and Yeardley Love ("Teammates saw signs of trouble, but failed to act," Feb. 10). Among them is that alcoholism and aggression are real issues that need to be addressed. We all know that alcohol changes the brain, causing some to react in violent ways. For those with prior anger issues, the violence likely intensifies with the addition of alcohol and other substances. Mr. Huguely had consumed 15 drinks on the day of the incident, and other testimony suggests he suffered from anger issues.
NEWS
By Huntley J. Cross | November 25, 1990
There is a product that can be found in many Anne Arundel County liquor stores that I believe is dangerous and a threat to anyone who mistakes it for a wine cooler.This product is a fortified wine, which has a labeled alcohol content of 20 percent by volume (40 proof). Wine coolers have an alcohol content that ranges from 4 percent to 7 percent. Regular table wines average about 12 percent alcohol.Fortified wine, or "Cisco," comes in five flavors: red, peach, orange, berry and gold. It is bottled in two sizes: 375 and 750 milliliters.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2010
Michelle Rikon of Elkridge has a 12-year-old son with multiple disabilities who sometimes violently lashes out at her and his 8-year-old brother, traumatizing his younger brother and monopolizing his mother's time to the point that the 8-year-old won't eat and might need a colostomy. He's fed through a tube, she said, while her older boy has been hospitalized seven times for his outbursts, and nothing seems to help. If that weren't bad enough, she said, "We have received no services" from the state's Developmental Disabilities Administration.
NEWS
January 23, 2014
President Barack Obama's position on smoking marijuana is extremely misguided ( "Obama: pot a 'vice' but no more dangerous than alcohol," Jan. 19). As a 60-year-old boomer who has for the most part drunk responsibly for 45 years and has experimented with marijuana on occasion, I adamantly reject his opinion equating smoking pot to smoking cigarettes and drinking alcohol. While drinking alcohol in moderation can gradually deteriorate one's ability to function adequately, smoking even a small amount of marijuana can debilitate a person in minutes without a warning.
NEWS
By Richard S. Madaleno Jr | August 4, 2014
Excessive drinking among college students is a public health problem that is larger than just the colleges and universities. It is a problem for our entire state. The more than 270,000 students attending college in Maryland comprise a large and critical segment of our future workforce. This is why I was proud to work with the leadership and staff of the Maryland Collaborative to Reduce College Drinking and Related Problems this legislative session to ban the sale of extreme-strength "grain" alcohol.
NEWS
August 2, 2014
Michelle Minton's attack on my alcohol policy research ( "Are tax dollars paying for anti-alcohol advocacy?" July 30) exhibits a fundamental disagreement with public health research and practice. From immunizations to smoke-free workplaces to motor vehicle safety, public health aims at population-based changes to increase health and well-being. Over the last century, life expectancy in the United States has increased 30 years. No fewer than 25 of these years are credited to public health measures.
NEWS
By Michelle Minton | July 30, 2014
This month, Maryland banned high-proof liquors like Everclear and other inexpensive tipples . Self-proclaimed public health activists claimed such "high octane" liquors increased the likelihood of binge-drinking and sexual assaults on college campuses. While the merits of the ban are debatable, one aspect of it is not: the use of taxpayer money to support a political agenda.   The "grain alcohol ban" was backed by the Maryland Collaborative to Reduce College Drinking and Related Problems, a coalition of researchers and administrators at 10 Maryland colleges and universities.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | July 10, 2014
Excessive drinking accounts for 10 percent of deaths among working-age adults, making it the leading cause of preventable death of Americans, according to new research from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention . The alcohol use killed about 88,000 people aged 20 to 64 a year from 2006 to 2010, shortening their lives by about 30 years. They died from health effects including breast cancer, liver disease and heart disease, as well as from violence, alcohol poisoning and car crashes.
NEWS
By Sean Welsh and Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
One patient was released from hospital care and another was in stable condition at the University of Maryland Shock Trauma Monday, after the two fell 200 feet off Prettyboy Dam in northern Baltimore County this weekend, police said. It was not clear whether the men, in their early 20s, were hiking or kayaking before the fall, Baltimore Environmental Police Officer Heidi Greenleaf said, but alcohol was a factor in the incident. The men were not identified. The one who was released from York General Hospital had a broken left arm and head injuries, and the other remained hospitalized at Shock Trauma Monday with a severe head injury, possible broken bones and internal injuries, Greenleaf said.
NEWS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
Maryland joins at least a dozen other states Tuesday in banning the sale of 190-proof grain alcohol, a measure that lawmakers hope will help to reduce sexual assaults and binge drinking among college students. The bill is one of more than 200 that go into effect Tuesday; other bills expand the earned income tax credit for low-income residents and exempt more wealthy Marylanders from the estate tax, overhaul Baltimore City liquor board practices and establish incentives to encourage investment in research universities.
NEWS
May 28, 2012
Regarding Maryvale Preparatory School's mandatory alcohol education program ("At Maryvale Prep, alcohol education comes before prom," May 24), anything that can help make sure these seniors are safe now that they are almost in college is a good thing. College parties will present them with increased peer pressure and risky activities, but knowing what choices are the right choices is powerful knowledge for a teen. That could make the difference in putting them in a situation where they or a friend gets injured or in trouble.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2013
The Senator Theatre and its adjoining small-plates restaurant, Bar Zini, will be authorized to sell alcohol when it reopens in the coming months, after a Baltimore licensing board voted Thursday to approve its application. The Rosebank theater, closed since April 2012, is undergoing more than $3 million in renovations, including the addition of the nearly 100-seat Mediterranean restaurant, according to co-owners Kathleen Cusack Lyon and her father, James "Buzz" Cusack. The theater will expand to four screens with room for 770 guests.
NEWS
June 10, 2014
We noted an important connection between two separate articles that appeared in the June 4 issue of The Sun. In the article regarding hazing among Towson University cheerleaders ( "Towson U. hazing details released" ), we read that according to investigators, "the women were told they had a choice of doing cocaine or heroin, to test their understanding of team rules. Although no drugs were provided, this was done to let the new members [on the cheerleading team] know that the team was drug free, investigators wrote.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2014
Towson University's top-ranked cheerleading team encouraged its new members to drink alcohol before they put on blindfolds, pulled adult diapers over their shorts and performed a dance described as a hazing ritual last summer, newly released documents show. The documents, obtained by The Baltimore Sun in a public records request, outline violations of the student code - including serving alcohol to those under 21 - and detail for the first time why Towson's cheerleading team was suspended by the university for the 2013-2014 academic year.
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