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By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | June 7, 1996
If watching burly men die really horrible deaths for two hours is your idea of fun, boy, are you going to love "The Rock." This is one testosterone-fueled movie.It's also overly long and relentless in its noise and carnage, and as a result, its interesting characters are too-often eclipsed.The film was produced by Jerry Bruckheimer and the late Don Simpson, whose action-heavy credits include a couple of "Beverly Hills Cop" movies, "Top Gun," "Days of Thunder" and "Crimson Tide."Nicolas Cage stars as a chemical-weapons expert for the FBI, the elaborately named Stanley Goodspeed.
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By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun Reporter | December 26, 2007
ALCATRAZ ISLAND, Calif. -- In an age when college football coaches hope their players stay out of trouble, Ralph Friedgen brought his Maryland Terrapins to one of history's most notorious prisons Monday afternoon. Visiting Alcatraz, a penitentiary that has been closed since 1963 and is now an official U.S. landmark, is part of the nonfootball itinerary for the Terps as they get ready for Friday night's Emerald Bowl against Oregon State at San Francisco's AT&T Park. Emerald Bowl Maryland vs. Oregon State, San Francisco, Friday, 8:30 p.m., ESPN, 105.7 FM, 1300 AM Line: Oregon State by 5
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FEATURES
By Carol Bidwell and Carol Bidwell,LOS ANGELES DAILY NEWS | June 30, 1996
It's eerie to be here, surrounded by concrete and cold steel bars, with the lights and laughter of the city less than two miles away, across the bay's cold, treacherous waters.But this is the somber, bleak atmosphere of Alcatraz, the hilltop fortress known as "The Rock," where for 30 years, the nation's most notorious criminals -- including "Scarface" Al Capone and George "Machine Gun" Kelly -- were incarcerated."It was terrible," former inmate Nathan Glenn Williams said, standing just a few steps from the 9-by-5-foot cell where he served seven years for bank robbery in the 1950s.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | October 13, 2007
The construction fences are beginning to come down around Cathedral Street's old Alcazar Ballroom as the Baltimore School for the Arts completes its renewal of this complex of Baltimore treasures. For months now, an adjoining Cathedral Street double-width brownstone has been architecturally knitted into the Alcazar. The old Alcazar possesses a curious social pedigree. The word Alcazar is Spanish for palace or fortress, based upon an Arab word.
NEWS
April 20, 1992
Neville Brand, 71, a "tough guy" character actor who appeared in more than 40 films including "Stalag 17" and "The Birdman of Alcatraz," died of emphysema Thursday in Sacramento, Calif.
SPORTS
By Michael Reeb | December 11, 1990
While a half-marathon is less trying than a metric (16.3) marathon or a marathon itself, it is more taxing than a 10K or even a 10-miler. But excuse Jeff Hinte if he described Sunday's Harmony Half-Marathon in Harford County as a "nice, little run through the countryside."That's because, of late, Hinte has been doing longer runs. On Nov. 17, he completed the John F. Kennedy 50-Miler from Boonsboro to Williamsport in 6:50. On Oct. 28, he finished the Escape from Alcatraz Triathlon, a 1 1/2 -mile swim, a 22-mile bike and an 18 1/2 -mile run, in 4 hours, 21 minutes, 2 seconds.
NEWS
By Stevenson Swanson and Stevenson Swanson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 22, 2002
OSSINING, N.Y. - The gaunt, gray walls stretch along the east bank of the Hudson River for more than 400 feet, broken only by the rusting bars that despairing prisoners once stared through. Tight coils of razor wire and infrared detectors protect this roofless shell of a building. Armed guards stare down from watchtowers. This may not sound like a natural setting for a tourist attraction, but then this is Sing Sing, the original "big house" and possibly America's most famous functioning prison.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | January 20, 1995
Ah, just when we need it. An anti-Alcatraz movie. I like a film that takes a tough position on an institution that closed in 1963!The film is "Murder in the First," an account of a trial held in 1942 in which a lawyer argued that his convict client, who had murdered another convict in plain view of 200 inmates by cutting his throat with a spoon (he was ticked, wouldn't you say?), was actually not guilty because . . . Alcatraz made him do it.You could argue, I suppose, that this was the beginning of the collapse of American civilization.
FEATURES
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 7, 1996
Alcatraz Island has once again become a significant marine bird habitat. Last year, rangers spotted nearly 900 nesting pairs on the island, one of the highest counts since the National Park Service took over the 22-acre island in San Francisco Bay in 1972.With this year's nesting season well under way, Daphne Hatch, a wildlife specialist with the park service, said she was hopeful that the 1996 count will be even greater.Historically, Alcatraz was an important avian environment. Indians collected eggs there, and 18th-century Spaniards named it for the flocks of sea birds they found perched on its rocky slopes.
NEWS
By JEFF DANZINGER and JEFF DANZINGER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 18, 1996
"Like a Hurricane," by Paul Chaat Smith and Robert Allen Warrior. New Press. 340 pages. $25.The fractious history of the American Indian Movement in this confused book reminded me of the history of anarchism. Anarchism was doomed because it was against organization that made movements possible. AIM and the other Indian protest organizations before and after it were all poorly organized and led so badly they had almost no leadership. Sadly, we now know the suffering, death and destruction of those years could have been avoided by the simple act of opening casinos.
TRAVEL
May 27, 2007
SAN FRANCISCO A WALK IN THE YARD A Self-Guided Tour of the U.S. Naval Academy Naval Institute Press, $21.95 Annapolis is a college town like no other. Cheek-by-jowl to the touristy Historic District, behind walls and gates, is the U.S. Naval Academy, whose verdant and resplendent grounds were just this side of a public park for Annapolitans before Sept. 11. Entrance is much more difficult now -- civilians cannot drive onto The Yard and pedestrians must have identification -- but still worth it. A walking tour of The Yard, as it is called, can take several hours, a master's degree in U.S. military history or a paid appointment with one of the guides from the visitors center just inside Gate One. Or you can simply purchase a copy of A Walk in the Yard, by Taylor Baldwin Kiland and photographer Jamie Howren, and focus on what appeals most -- the magisterial history of the golden-domed Naval Academy Chapel or the cool and haunting darkness of John Paul Jones' crypt.
NEWS
By Stevenson Swanson and Stevenson Swanson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 22, 2002
OSSINING, N.Y. - The gaunt, gray walls stretch along the east bank of the Hudson River for more than 400 feet, broken only by the rusting bars that despairing prisoners once stared through. Tight coils of razor wire and infrared detectors protect this roofless shell of a building. Armed guards stare down from watchtowers. This may not sound like a natural setting for a tourist attraction, but then this is Sing Sing, the original "big house" and possibly America's most famous functioning prison.
NEWS
By JEFF DANZINGER and JEFF DANZINGER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 18, 1996
"Like a Hurricane," by Paul Chaat Smith and Robert Allen Warrior. New Press. 340 pages. $25.The fractious history of the American Indian Movement in this confused book reminded me of the history of anarchism. Anarchism was doomed because it was against organization that made movements possible. AIM and the other Indian protest organizations before and after it were all poorly organized and led so badly they had almost no leadership. Sadly, we now know the suffering, death and destruction of those years could have been avoided by the simple act of opening casinos.
FEATURES
By Carol Bidwell and Carol Bidwell,LOS ANGELES DAILY NEWS | June 30, 1996
It's eerie to be here, surrounded by concrete and cold steel bars, with the lights and laughter of the city less than two miles away, across the bay's cold, treacherous waters.But this is the somber, bleak atmosphere of Alcatraz, the hilltop fortress known as "The Rock," where for 30 years, the nation's most notorious criminals -- including "Scarface" Al Capone and George "Machine Gun" Kelly -- were incarcerated."It was terrible," former inmate Nathan Glenn Williams said, standing just a few steps from the 9-by-5-foot cell where he served seven years for bank robbery in the 1950s.
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | June 7, 1996
If watching burly men die really horrible deaths for two hours is your idea of fun, boy, are you going to love "The Rock." This is one testosterone-fueled movie.It's also overly long and relentless in its noise and carnage, and as a result, its interesting characters are too-often eclipsed.The film was produced by Jerry Bruckheimer and the late Don Simpson, whose action-heavy credits include a couple of "Beverly Hills Cop" movies, "Top Gun," "Days of Thunder" and "Crimson Tide."Nicolas Cage stars as a chemical-weapons expert for the FBI, the elaborately named Stanley Goodspeed.
FEATURES
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 7, 1996
Alcatraz Island has once again become a significant marine bird habitat. Last year, rangers spotted nearly 900 nesting pairs on the island, one of the highest counts since the National Park Service took over the 22-acre island in San Francisco Bay in 1972.With this year's nesting season well under way, Daphne Hatch, a wildlife specialist with the park service, said she was hopeful that the 1996 count will be even greater.Historically, Alcatraz was an important avian environment. Indians collected eggs there, and 18th-century Spaniards named it for the flocks of sea birds they found perched on its rocky slopes.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | October 13, 2007
The construction fences are beginning to come down around Cathedral Street's old Alcazar Ballroom as the Baltimore School for the Arts completes its renewal of this complex of Baltimore treasures. For months now, an adjoining Cathedral Street double-width brownstone has been architecturally knitted into the Alcazar. The old Alcazar possesses a curious social pedigree. The word Alcazar is Spanish for palace or fortress, based upon an Arab word.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun Reporter | December 26, 2007
ALCATRAZ ISLAND, Calif. -- In an age when college football coaches hope their players stay out of trouble, Ralph Friedgen brought his Maryland Terrapins to one of history's most notorious prisons Monday afternoon. Visiting Alcatraz, a penitentiary that has been closed since 1963 and is now an official U.S. landmark, is part of the nonfootball itinerary for the Terps as they get ready for Friday night's Emerald Bowl against Oregon State at San Francisco's AT&T Park. Emerald Bowl Maryland vs. Oregon State, San Francisco, Friday, 8:30 p.m., ESPN, 105.7 FM, 1300 AM Line: Oregon State by 5
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | January 20, 1995
Ah, just when we need it. An anti-Alcatraz movie. I like a film that takes a tough position on an institution that closed in 1963!The film is "Murder in the First," an account of a trial held in 1942 in which a lawyer argued that his convict client, who had murdered another convict in plain view of 200 inmates by cutting his throat with a spoon (he was ticked, wouldn't you say?), was actually not guilty because . . . Alcatraz made him do it.You could argue, I suppose, that this was the beginning of the collapse of American civilization.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 11, 1993
SAN FRANCISCO -- Spurred by new information from a former inmate, the U.S. Marshal's Service has revived its hunt for three bank robbers who escaped from the notorious Alcatraz Island penitentiary in 1962 and were presumed drowned or eaten by sharks.Former convict Thomas Kent, interviewed for an episode of "America's Most Wanted" airing later this month, provides "significant new leads" in the remarkable escape, the subject of a popular Clint Eastwood movie, a spokesman for the Marshal's Service said yesterday.
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