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By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | December 2, 2002
Think "Toni Braxton," and a couple of things inevitably come to mind - saucy hits like "You're Making Me High" (about satisfying her desire for a man) and her unforgettable 2001 Grammy night dress, little more than a strategically placed long, white scarf. She laughs with a tinge of embarrassment when these are now mentioned, however. It's not that the daughter of a Maryland preacher doesn't want to keep pushing the sexual envelope and flaunting her God-given assets. It's just, well, she has other considerations now. In the time since her last album - 2000's The Heat - she's gotten married, had a son and now is pregnant again with another boy. "Songs like `You're Making Me High,' I would have to explain that to my boys when they get older," the Severn native says by phone from her home in Los Angeles.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | December 29, 2005
Generally speaking, pop in 2005 wasn't as conventional as it had been the previous year. But it wasn't entirely thrilling, either. In 2004, pop audiences mostly gravitated toward full, warm productions with echoes of the past. Alicia Keys' unabashedly old-fashioned The Diary of Alicia Keys and Ray Charles' tepid duets album, Genius Loves Company, were huge hits last year. But the best musical moments of '05 achieved more with less. The usually rowdy Ying Yang Twins, for instance, literally brought things down to a whisper on the nasty "Wait (The Whisper Song)
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 12, 1995
Ask Carly Simon what she likes best about the band she has put together for her first tour in 14 years, and one of the first things she mentions is former Living Colour bassist Doug Wimbish."
FEATURES
By Tom Moon and Tom Moon,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 29, 2002
Hush, friend. The High Church of Rock and Roll, Asbury Park branch, has resumed services. Look inside your heart and answer truthfully: Don't we need that sound, those three-chord parables about faith, now more than ever? With the release tomorrow of Springsteen's The Rising, it's time once again to drop the needle and pray. Deeply affected by the events that shattered us all in September, the iconic soul reverend is talking a language we can understand: "This too shall pass." "An eye for an eye."
FEATURES
By J.D. CONSIDINE and J.D. CONSIDINE,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | July 10, 1997
That the recording industry runs on hype is not news. Obsessed with trends and desperately seeking the Next Big Whatever, its denizens are forever listening for the latest buzz -- something that almost always has to do with fashion, cool or perceived profitability.Musical value, needless to say, usually ends up being the last thing these folks consider. If an album requires close attention and multiple hearings to make its mark, of course it's going to get ignored. Hey, who has time for that sort of thing anymore?
NEWS
By Michael R. Driscoll and Michael R. Driscoll,Staff writer | October 26, 1990
Like the gentlemanly rockers they are, the David Rose Band is coming back to the county to say, "Thanks for all your help."The 4-year-old band, led by former CBS and RCA recording artist David Rose on the violin, will be at Deze's Restaurant in Edgewater tomorrow from 9:30 p.m. to 1:30 a.m.There they plan to celebrate the release of their newly completed second album, "Harbortown," with the fans whom Rose credits as being a big part of the album's development.The...
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Staff writer | January 30, 1991
He plays a Stratocaster guitar like Buddy Holly, and he sings like Bob Dylan.Spotlight, please, on Richard L. Taylor, a 38-year-old musician recently honored by Maryland Musician magazine for the No. 1 Mid-Atlantic Album of 1990."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2011
Reading the commentary on Wye Oak's last album, "The Knot," and the new one, "Civilian," you might think there's little difference between the two. Adjectives like lush, evocative and brooding are alternatively used to describe them. But Jenn Wasner, the duo's vocalist and guitarist, says the new album is different in several respects, and especially in one: It's just better. With "The Knot," she and multi-instrumentalist Andy Stack overplayed the benefits of brand-new label representation, she says.
FEATURES
By Robert Hilburn and Robert Hilburn,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 6, 2003
Bruce Springsteen's The Rising has been the odds-on favorite to win a Grammy for album of the year since advance copies began circulating in the record industry last spring. Not only is the veteran rocker long overdue for the Grammys' top honor, but The Rising is also a heartfelt reflection of the nation's resilience after the horrors of Sept. 11. A Springsteen victory would be a classic feel-good moment in the Grammy Awards ceremony, which will be held Feb. 23 in New York. But don't start etching Springsteen's name on a statuette yet. Two other albums likely to be named in the category when the nominations are announced tomorrow had enough impact to emerge as serious challengers: Eminem's The Eminem Show and Norah Jones' Come Away With Me. Eminem's previous collection, The Marshall Mathers LP, deserved the best album award two years ago, but the violent, sometimes ugly side of the rap provocateur's music no doubt made many recording academy members feel uncomfortable giving him the Grammy seal of approval.
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun pop music critic | April 29, 2008
Which came first, Madonna's image or her music? In her 25-year career, the pop superstar's ever-changing look and provocations garnered more critical attention than her musical output. Yet in that time, she managed to score major hits and sell 200 million albums around the world. There's no question that her morphing image, which used to be surprising and daring, helped sell her music. Although her albums were often calculated appropriations of musical sub-genres, they used to offer thrills.
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