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By Mike Himowitz | June 19, 2000
Over the last year I've waxed poetic about online photo-sharing sites, which allow you to post digital snapshots in Web albums that your family and friends can view and download. The only problem with this approach is that not everyone in your family may have a Web connection, or at least one that's fast enough to make downloading large digital images worthwhile. And once they download photos, many people don't know what to do with them. That's why I was intrigued and ultimately delighted by FlipAlbum CD Maker from E-Book Systems (www.
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By Craig Seymour and Craig Seymour,COX NEWS SERVICE | December 3, 2002
Here's the punch line: Mariah Carey. Now write your own joke. This is basically what Carey has become for most people, following her embarrassing movie bomb Glitter, the accompanying flop soundtrack and the fact that her former record label, Virgin, paid a reported $30 million just to get rid of her. Where once she was America's singing Stepford-like sweetheart, she has become a living farce - Anna Nicole Smith with a 5-octave range. But with the release of her new album, Charmbracelet, out today, Carey is trying to change that image.
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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | October 29, 1991
It's Hammer time again.At least, he and his record company hope it is. After all, his last album, "Please Hammer Don't Hurt 'Em," sold some 10 million copies, topping the Billboard album charts for 21 weeks. Consequently, they're doing everything imaginable to make sure the rapper's new album, "Too Legit to Quit" (Capitol 98151, arriving in record stores today), can not only touch that, but top it.Don't hold your breath, though. Even though his new album boasts many of the same strengths that made "Please Hammer" a multiplatinum phenomenon, it lacks both the confidence and spontaneity of its predecessor.
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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | March 21, 1993
If notoriety really does translate into record sales, then Ice-T's "Home Invasion" (Rhyme Syndicate/Priority 53858, in stores Tuesday) ought to go quintuple platinum.This is the album Ice-T promised would be more provocative than "Cop Killer" or anything on "O.G. Original Gangster," and it started raising a ruckus even before it was released. Its content provoked Warner Bros. into terminating Ice-T's contract, and its cover has generated more complaints than any album art since Guns N' Roses' "Appetite for Destruction."
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By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | October 9, 2007
Brave, the title of Jennifer Lopez's new album out today, is a misnomer. And the cover shot, featuring the pop star in an intense face-off with her own image, is also misleading. The title and packaging suggest that J. Lo is breaking new artistic ground, that she's challenging herself to do more than the trend-conscious dance-pop that pushed her four previous albums to multiplatinum sales. But that isn't the case at all. Brave is the safest, most predictable album Lopez has recorded. Maybe pregnancy, as it's been rumored, has brought out a tamer side, also seen during her tepid performance with Marc Anthony Friday night at the Verizon Center in Washington.
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By Glenn Gamboa and Glenn Gamboa,NEWSDAY | June 10, 2008
Tha Carter III Lil Wayne Grade: B+ Actors of a certain standing live by an old adage - "one for the money, one for the work" - a bit of career calculus where they switch off between working on money-making blockbusters and more artistic, less commercial pursuits. Rappers, especially in this declining economy, can't afford that kind of luxury, but Lil Wayne comes close on Tha Carter III (Cash Money), bouncing between irresistible pop hits and some wild hip-hop experimentation. He performs at 1st Mariner Arena tonight with Birdman, Yo Gotti and Gucci Man The hits are pretty self-evident.
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By Greg Kot and Greg Kot,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 24, 2002
Yankee Hotel Foxtrot is the best album in Wilco's career, and, had it come out last year as scheduled, it would have topped many year-end Top-10 lists. But that doesn't mean diddly in record-company hallways. Wilco's commercial impact makes it a gnat on the forearm of the pop-culture Goliath. But Foxtrot isn't merely an album aimed at some elite audience of cult followers. Its themes couldn't be more universal; it's a meditation both musical and lyrical on what it means to live in the world's most prosperous country.
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By Geoff Boucher and Geoff Boucher,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 19, 2003
Warren Zevon is dying, and he wants to make a record." It was a jolting and macabre message to be sure, and that only propelled it faster through the wiring of famous friends, managers, agents and labels that links rock musicians to one another. The ones who know Zevon best probably allowed themselves a sad smile. This was exactly the sort of thing you would expect from the singer-songwriter, whose grim and funny music always seemed like a margarita stand in a mausoleum - sure, the songs all seemed to say, have some fun, just don't forget where this big party is going to end. So when the call went out, many answered: Bruce Springsteen, Jackson Browne, Don Henley, Tom Petty, Emmylou Harris, Ry Cooder and many others, some contributing from afar, others coming to see the stricken Zevon, who had gone public with the diagnosis of his terminal cancer.
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By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | February 10, 2004
On stage and on TV, she's the deer in the headlights. It's been almost two years since Norah Jones released her overrated debut, Come Away With Me, a lo-fi collection of adult pop seasoned with jazz and country, and she still seems very uncomfortable with the success it brought her. Granted, the praise and accolades lavished upon the album, which sold 17 million copies worldwide, surprised folks in and outside the industry. (Norah, who?) And, apparently, the sudden, whirl wind ride up the pop charts and the five Grammys last year unnerved the dark-eyed Texas beauty so much that she reportedly begged Blue Note, her label, to stop promoting the record.
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By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | December 2, 2002
Think "Toni Braxton," and a couple of things inevitably come to mind - saucy hits like "You're Making Me High" (about satisfying her desire for a man) and her unforgettable 2001 Grammy night dress, little more than a strategically placed long, white scarf. She laughs with a tinge of embarrassment when these are now mentioned, however. It's not that the daughter of a Maryland preacher doesn't want to keep pushing the sexual envelope and flaunting her God-given assets. It's just, well, she has other considerations now. In the time since her last album - 2000's The Heat - she's gotten married, had a son and now is pregnant again with another boy. "Songs like `You're Making Me High,' I would have to explain that to my boys when they get older," the Severn native says by phone from her home in Los Angeles.
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