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By MIKE LITTWIN | December 7, 1994
It would not be entirely accurate to say I was first in line at the music store.I was not first in line, because, technically, there was no line.It was just me.I was there to purchase the new Beatles album, which was released yesterday. These were words -- new Beatles album -- I never expected to say again in that order. The last new Beatles album to hit the stores was "Let It Be" in 1970, and the boys had already broken up by then, meaning Linda McCartney would soon be allowed to play keyboard in public.
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FEATURES
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | September 1, 2001
She burst onto the music scene in 1999 at the tail end of the blond bombshell-ette wave that brought the world teen sirens Britney Spears and Christina Aguilera. But Jessica Simpson's image diverged from her counterparts' in a few distinct ways. She was an openly devout Christian, a girl determined to have such a wholesome image she stayed as covered up as a young pop princess can be these days. And as America gradually got to know Simpson, her vow to her father to abstain from sex until marriage quickly became as well-known as her top-40 hits.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Los Angeles Times | June 6, 2004
Should Prince's new Musicology go down in the pop annals as "The Asterisk Album?" It has earned one on a couple of fronts -- first, for the sales boost that the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame musician got by distributing a copy of his latest CD to everyone attending his current concert tour, and second, for prompting Billboard magazine this past week to change its sales chart policy because of that. Musicology is Prince's hottest album in years, partially because Nielsen SoundScan, whose figures are used by Billboard to determine chart position, has counted as "sales" the more than 150,000 copies given to fans that have attended his concert tour.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | February 28, 1992
WAYNE'S WORLDMusic from the Motion Picture (Reprise 26805)What makes the denizens of "Wayne's World" so believable is the attention to detail Mike Myers and Dana Carvey lavish on Wayne and Garth; not only do these two look like typical suburban rivet-heads, but they talk and think like them, too. So why doesn't the soundtrack album to "Wayne's World" ring as true? Part of the problem has to do with movie production up-sizing -- for instance, taking the raucously amateurish "Wayne's World Theme" and inflating it to the album-rock proportions found here.
FEATURES
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | December 2, 2002
Think "Toni Braxton," and a couple of things inevitably come to mind - saucy hits like "You're Making Me High" (about satisfying her desire for a man) and her unforgettable 2001 Grammy night dress, little more than a strategically placed long, white scarf. She laughs with a tinge of embarrassment when these are now mentioned, however. It's not that the daughter of a Maryland preacher doesn't want to keep pushing the sexual envelope and flaunting her God-given assets. It's just, well, she has other considerations now. In the time since her last album - 2000's The Heat - she's gotten married, had a son and now is pregnant again with another boy. "Songs like `You're Making Me High,' I would have to explain that to my boys when they get older," the Severn native says by phone from her home in Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | June 19, 2000
Over the last year I've waxed poetic about online photo-sharing sites, which allow you to post digital snapshots in Web albums that your family and friends can view and download. The only problem with this approach is that not everyone in your family may have a Web connection, or at least one that's fast enough to make downloading large digital images worthwhile. And once they download photos, many people don't know what to do with them. That's why I was intrigued and ultimately delighted by FlipAlbum CD Maker from E-Book Systems (www.
FEATURES
By Craig Seymour and Craig Seymour,COX NEWS SERVICE | December 3, 2002
Here's the punch line: Mariah Carey. Now write your own joke. This is basically what Carey has become for most people, following her embarrassing movie bomb Glitter, the accompanying flop soundtrack and the fact that her former record label, Virgin, paid a reported $30 million just to get rid of her. Where once she was America's singing Stepford-like sweetheart, she has become a living farce - Anna Nicole Smith with a 5-octave range. But with the release of her new album, Charmbracelet, out today, Carey is trying to change that image.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | October 29, 1991
It's Hammer time again.At least, he and his record company hope it is. After all, his last album, "Please Hammer Don't Hurt 'Em," sold some 10 million copies, topping the Billboard album charts for 21 weeks. Consequently, they're doing everything imaginable to make sure the rapper's new album, "Too Legit to Quit" (Capitol 98151, arriving in record stores today), can not only touch that, but top it.Don't hold your breath, though. Even though his new album boasts many of the same strengths that made "Please Hammer" a multiplatinum phenomenon, it lacks both the confidence and spontaneity of its predecessor.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | March 21, 1993
If notoriety really does translate into record sales, then Ice-T's "Home Invasion" (Rhyme Syndicate/Priority 53858, in stores Tuesday) ought to go quintuple platinum.This is the album Ice-T promised would be more provocative than "Cop Killer" or anything on "O.G. Original Gangster," and it started raising a ruckus even before it was released. Its content provoked Warner Bros. into terminating Ice-T's contract, and its cover has generated more complaints than any album art since Guns N' Roses' "Appetite for Destruction."
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | October 9, 2007
Brave, the title of Jennifer Lopez's new album out today, is a misnomer. And the cover shot, featuring the pop star in an intense face-off with her own image, is also misleading. The title and packaging suggest that J. Lo is breaking new artistic ground, that she's challenging herself to do more than the trend-conscious dance-pop that pushed her four previous albums to multiplatinum sales. But that isn't the case at all. Brave is the safest, most predictable album Lopez has recorded. Maybe pregnancy, as it's been rumored, has brought out a tamer side, also seen during her tepid performance with Marc Anthony Friday night at the Verizon Center in Washington.
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