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NEWS
July 31, 2003
On July 28, 2003, YETTA (nee Unger); beloved wife of Marvin Albom; loving mother of Judy Smulson, Arlene Veditz and Ronnie Albom of Baltimore; loving mother-in-law of Harry (Chick) Veditz; beloved sister of Helen Weissman of Baltimore, MD, Rose Markow of DelRey Beach, FL, and Sam Unger of Reisterstown, MD, and the late Isaac and Jennie Unger; loving grandmother of Jason Smulson, Jonathan Veditz and Matthew Albom. Also survived by loving nieces and nephews. Services at SOL LEVINSON & BROS.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY and MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY,SUN REPORTER | November 17, 2005
In Tuesdays with Morrie, a young man visiting his dying mentor brings gifts of food along on his weekly visits, including the egg salad that the invalid enjoyed in his healthier days. It's too bad the care package didn't include something for indigestion. The audience could use some. The play, co-written by Mitch Albom and Jeffrey Hatcher, might make even the most robust stomach queasy. It is full of such happy little bromides as, and I'm paraphrasing, "I feel dead when I'm taking, but alive when I'm giving" or "Leaves are the most glorious right before they fall from the tree."
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SPORTS
By Michael Hirsley and Michael Hirsley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 10, 2005
Mitch Albom, one of Detroit's most prominent figures, is a one-man multimedia entity as a nationally known sports columnist, radio and TV personality, best-selling author and playwright. He added another role last week, one no journalist wants. Albom is making news rather than reporting it, under suspension from the Detroit Free Press until the paper completes an investigation of a fabrication in a column by Albom that ran last Sunday. Reaction in the journalism community, from columnist peers to college instructors, ranged from harsh to empathetic.
NEWS
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 13, 2005
Harold Gould never meant to be old before his time, but that's the way the actor has usually been cast. "I've done older parts all my life," the mellow-voiced performer says. Now, for a change, he's playing someone younger than he is. OK, not a whole lot younger. But for 81-year-old Gould, playing 78-year-old Morrie Schwartz is certainly more age-appropriate than the generation-older characters he used to play. And, Gould has something else in common with Morrie, the title character in Tuesdays with Morrie, Jeffrey Hatcher and Mitch Albom's stage adaptation of Albom's bestselling book.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2005
They came to hear about Morrie and Eddie, two sagacious old men from the books of author and Detroit Free Press columnist Mitch Albom. As the featured speaker at the annual fund-raising luncheon for the House of Ruth Maryland, held at M&T Bank Stadium yesterday, Albom didn't disappoint. But lately, Albom has drawn more attention - notoriety, actually - for a column he wrote last month about Jason (Richardson) and Mateen (Cleaves), two alumni attending a tournament game at their alma mater.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Alex Beam and Alex Beam,BOSTON GLOBE | December 14, 2003
The scene at the Borders megastore in downtown Boston resembles a Howard Dean flash mob. Noontime in-store readings can be lonely affairs, and this one hasn't been widely promoted, but 300 people have jammed the store's modest-size speaking area, sitting on the floor and wedging themselves in among the shelves. Who's here? Mitch Albom, a longtime sports columnist for the Detroit Free Press and author of Tuesdays With Morrie, one of the most successful nonfiction books of the past decade.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1997
In a case that had escaped public notice, the chief judge of Baltimore City Circuit Court has been cleared of a criminal traffic charge in Baltimore County that could have landed him in jail.Robert I. H. Hammerman was found not guilty last month of leaving the scene of a relatively minor personal property damage accident despite testimony from two eyewitnesses and a police officer. John H. Garmer, chief administrative judge for Baltimore County Circuit Court, cleared Hammerman of the charge Sept.
TOPIC
By Paul Moore | April 17, 2005
THESE ARE demanding days for John X. Miller of the Detroit Free Press. Miller is the newspaper's public editor and has been hearing from hundreds of readers about a case of fabrication by Mitch Albom, the highly regarded Free Press sports columnist. Albom is nationally known for his columns, radio and TV work and also is the best-selling author of Tuesdays With Morrie and The Five People You Meet in Heaven. Albom is the franchise player at The Detroit Free Press. It appears that he has become such a celebrity that his work has become virtually untouchable.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | December 4, 1999
As fashionable as it might be to complain about the sorry state of network television these days, you have to admit the Sunday-night movies have been pretty good this year.Last week, it was James Garner and Julie Andrews in "One Special Night" on CBS, and this week it's Jack Lemmon and Hank Azaria in ABC's "Oprah Winfrey Presents: Tuesdays With Morrie."The "Oprah Winfrey" part of the title is important, because the film, which Winfrey produced for ABC, is only "inspired" by the best-selling book from Mitch Albom.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Roy Rivenburg and Roy Rivenburg,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 9, 2005
Sick of reading all those boring roundups of the top stories of 2004? Wouldn't you rather get a jump on the top stories of 2005? Of course you would. Here are the highlights: January: Martha Stewart is caught trying to tunnel her way out of prison. Officials say the escape would have succeeded if Stewart hadn't spent so much time decorating the tunnel with imported Italian tiles, woodland accent pillows and festive wall sconces made with shivs. February: During the Super Bowl halftime show, Paul McCartney sings "When I'm 64" (soon to be retitled "When I Was 64")
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 2005
MUSIC PIANO ROCK This weekend, piano rocker Ben Folds collaborates with conductor Frank McNamara and the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra to create a unique musical experience. This is Folds' U.S. orchestral debut. Anna Eisenberg The event takes place at the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, 1212 Cathedral St., tomorrow and Saturday, starting at 8 p.m. Tickets are $34-$84. For details, call 410-783-8100. FILM UNDERGROUND FILMS This weekend's MicroCineFest 2005 at the G-Spot offers underground filmmakers in Baltimore a chance to showcase their talents.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2005
They came to hear about Morrie and Eddie, two sagacious old men from the books of author and Detroit Free Press columnist Mitch Albom. As the featured speaker at the annual fund-raising luncheon for the House of Ruth Maryland, held at M&T Bank Stadium yesterday, Albom didn't disappoint. But lately, Albom has drawn more attention - notoriety, actually - for a column he wrote last month about Jason (Richardson) and Mateen (Cleaves), two alumni attending a tournament game at their alma mater.
TOPIC
By Paul Moore | April 17, 2005
THESE ARE demanding days for John X. Miller of the Detroit Free Press. Miller is the newspaper's public editor and has been hearing from hundreds of readers about a case of fabrication by Mitch Albom, the highly regarded Free Press sports columnist. Albom is nationally known for his columns, radio and TV work and also is the best-selling author of Tuesdays With Morrie and The Five People You Meet in Heaven. Albom is the franchise player at The Detroit Free Press. It appears that he has become such a celebrity that his work has become virtually untouchable.
SPORTS
By Michael Hirsley and Michael Hirsley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 10, 2005
Mitch Albom, one of Detroit's most prominent figures, is a one-man multimedia entity as a nationally known sports columnist, radio and TV personality, best-selling author and playwright. He added another role last week, one no journalist wants. Albom is making news rather than reporting it, under suspension from the Detroit Free Press until the paper completes an investigation of a fabrication in a column by Albom that ran last Sunday. Reaction in the journalism community, from columnist peers to college instructors, ranged from harsh to empathetic.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Roy Rivenburg and Roy Rivenburg,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 9, 2005
Sick of reading all those boring roundups of the top stories of 2004? Wouldn't you rather get a jump on the top stories of 2005? Of course you would. Here are the highlights: January: Martha Stewart is caught trying to tunnel her way out of prison. Officials say the escape would have succeeded if Stewart hadn't spent so much time decorating the tunnel with imported Italian tiles, woodland accent pillows and festive wall sconces made with shivs. February: During the Super Bowl halftime show, Paul McCartney sings "When I'm 64" (soon to be retitled "When I Was 64")
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2004
National best sellers from data gathered and reported by Publishers Weekly. The number in parentheses indicates last week's position and may be greater than 10 as PW lists the top 15. Fiction ........................................ ............................ Weeks on list 1. (2) The Five People You Meet in Heaven, Mitch Albom ...62 2. (3) The Da Vinci Code, Dan Brown ..................................... 89 3. (-) A Salty Piece of Land, Jimmy Buffett .............................
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | July 30, 2004
I'LL TELL you why I like the guys at Millers Deli. Odds-on, they are North American champions of the art of the kibitz. Do we need translation? The kibitz is the comfortable small talk, the comic riff, the sarcasm falling gentle as a cinder block from the top of a building. After half a century or so, these guys have it down to an art form. And why not? Some of 'em, they've been hanging out since they were elementary school kids during the Depression. It was the country's depression, not theirs.
NEWS
November 7, 1999
Tim Dwight is a wide receiver and a kick returner for the Atlanta Falcons. Chosen in the fourth round of the National Football League draft in 1998 out of Iowa, he is only in his second year with the team and is busy getting a "read" on professional football.Here's what he has to say about reading.What kinds of books do you enjoy reading?"Adventure books, biographies and anything by Stephen King."What are you reading now or what book did you read last?" 'The Great Train Robbery' by Michael Crichton.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | July 30, 2004
I'LL TELL you why I like the guys at Millers Deli. Odds-on, they are North American champions of the art of the kibitz. Do we need translation? The kibitz is the comfortable small talk, the comic riff, the sarcasm falling gentle as a cinder block from the top of a building. After half a century or so, these guys have it down to an art form. And why not? Some of 'em, they've been hanging out since they were elementary school kids during the Depression. It was the country's depression, not theirs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Alex Beam and Alex Beam,BOSTON GLOBE | December 14, 2003
The scene at the Borders megastore in downtown Boston resembles a Howard Dean flash mob. Noontime in-store readings can be lonely affairs, and this one hasn't been widely promoted, but 300 people have jammed the store's modest-size speaking area, sitting on the floor and wedging themselves in among the shelves. Who's here? Mitch Albom, a longtime sports columnist for the Detroit Free Press and author of Tuesdays With Morrie, one of the most successful nonfiction books of the past decade.
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