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Albert Schweitzer

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By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | October 2, 2001
Cable News Network founder Ted Turner told an audience at the Johns Hopkins University yesterday that the United States in recent years has "not lived up to its responsibility in the world" by resisting international efforts against global warming, racism and a missile defense shield. Turner, vice chairman of AOL Time Warner Inc., appeared at Shriver Hall Auditorium to receive the 2001 Albert Schweitzer Gold Medal for Humanitarianism, which recognizes his philanthropic efforts to protect the natural world, promote peace and improve public health around the world.
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By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | October 2, 2001
Cable News Network founder Ted Turner told an audience at the Johns Hopkins University yesterday that the United States in recent years has "not lived up to its responsibility in the world" by resisting international efforts against global warming, racism and a missile defense shield. Turner, vice chairman of AOL Time Warner Inc., appeared at Shriver Hall Auditorium to receive the 2001 Albert Schweitzer Gold Medal for Humanitarianism, which recognizes his philanthropic efforts to protect the natural world, promote peace and improve public health around the world.
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FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | May 31, 1998
Albert Schweitzer had a kind of humanitarian glamour when he received the Nobel Prize in 1952.He was something like the Mother Teresa of his time. Much as she had served the poor in the slums of Calcutta, Schweitzer had established a missionary hospital in the equatorial jungle of Africa in 1913. He lived and worked there until his death at 90 in 1965.During his lifetime he was perhaps even more revered and respected than Mother Teresa is now. Life magazine once called him "the greatest man alive."
NEWS
September 5, 2001
In Baltimore City Public Works urges residents to cut weeds, avoid fines City officials are urging residents to take out their frustration with weeds by giving the unwanted plants a good whack. This is the time of year when weeds tend to grow quickly, according to the Department of Public Works, which is urging residents to tend to their curbs and sidewalks. Residents are responsible for maintaining their sidewalks and alleys. Fines for high grass and weeds start at $50 for residences and $100 for businesses, the city agency said.
FEATURES
By Sarah Pekkanen and Sarah Pekkanen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 18, 2000
Ask Gwen Mellon to tell you about herself, and you won't get the whole story. Maybe she's too modest to dwell on the astounding details and anecdotes that have enriched her 89 years - or maybe even the most awe-inspiring adventures can seem matter-of-fact if you have enough of them. Mellon doesn't, for example, elaborate about her husband Larry's mid-life impulse to abandon their Arizona ranch, go to medical school, then open a hospital in the poorest place they could find. "I thought it was wonderful," she says simply.
NEWS
March 30, 1997
Wilbur Richard Knorr, 51, a professor at Stanford University who traced the birth of mathematics in antiquity, died of melanoma March 18 in Palo Alto, Calif. A summa cum laude graduate of Harvard University, where he received a master's degree in 1968 and a doctorate in 1973, he joined the Stanford faculty in 1979 and held a joint appointment as a professor in the departments of philosophy and classics. Survivors include a sister in Columbia, Valerie Maione.Dr. David Miller, 80, an epidemiologist and son-in-law of the late Albert Schweitzer, died of lymphoma Thursday in Lavonia, Ga. He began working with Schweitzer in the 1960s at the Albert Schweitzer Hospital in Gabon, and in 1971 married the Nobel Peace Prize winner's only child, Rhena.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Staff Writer | June 24, 1992
EASTON -- The Aspen Institute for Humanistic Studies, a think tank that moved its primary campus from Aspen, Colo. to Maryland in 1984, has begun a $16 million expansion of its facility in the Rocky Mountain resort town where it was founded more than 40 years ago.But the prestigious research institute's president says there are no plans to close or downsize its campus near Queenstown on the Wye River's banks."
NEWS
By DONALD R. MORRIS | January 11, 1992
The other night, at a social gathering of affluent, well-educated people, mostly in their 30s and 40s, the name Albert Schweitzer popped up, and someone asked ''Who?'' Some (the older) were aghast, several (the younger) indignant that not recognizing the name should be regarded as reprehensible, and the few able to identify the name did so with the smugness of a Trivial Pursuit player scoring a point.Reputations blossom and fade, but only the greatest of them achieve immortality and flourish forever.
NEWS
September 5, 2001
In Baltimore City Public Works urges residents to cut weeds, avoid fines City officials are urging residents to take out their frustration with weeds by giving the unwanted plants a good whack. This is the time of year when weeds tend to grow quickly, according to the Department of Public Works, which is urging residents to tend to their curbs and sidewalks. Residents are responsible for maintaining their sidewalks and alleys. Fines for high grass and weeds start at $50 for residences and $100 for businesses, the city agency said.
NEWS
By GLENN McNATT | November 27, 1993
Earlier this week one of the titans of the keyboard died, though her name probably is unfamiliar to most Americans. Tatiana Nikolayeva, the Russian-born pianist known for her inspired interpretations of the music of J.S. Bach and Dmitri Shostakovich, died of a cerebral aneurysm in San Francisco last Monday during her second American concert tour. She was 69.That Ms. Nikolayeva was relatively unknown to Western audiences almost certainly was due more to political than artistic obstacles. Unlike other Soviet artists who managed to emigrate to the West, she had to await the fall of communism before becoming known outside Russia.
FEATURES
By Sarah Pekkanen and Sarah Pekkanen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 18, 2000
Ask Gwen Mellon to tell you about herself, and you won't get the whole story. Maybe she's too modest to dwell on the astounding details and anecdotes that have enriched her 89 years - or maybe even the most awe-inspiring adventures can seem matter-of-fact if you have enough of them. Mellon doesn't, for example, elaborate about her husband Larry's mid-life impulse to abandon their Arizona ranch, go to medical school, then open a hospital in the poorest place they could find. "I thought it was wonderful," she says simply.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | May 31, 1998
Albert Schweitzer had a kind of humanitarian glamour when he received the Nobel Prize in 1952.He was something like the Mother Teresa of his time. Much as she had served the poor in the slums of Calcutta, Schweitzer had established a missionary hospital in the equatorial jungle of Africa in 1913. He lived and worked there until his death at 90 in 1965.During his lifetime he was perhaps even more revered and respected than Mother Teresa is now. Life magazine once called him "the greatest man alive."
NEWS
March 30, 1997
Wilbur Richard Knorr, 51, a professor at Stanford University who traced the birth of mathematics in antiquity, died of melanoma March 18 in Palo Alto, Calif. A summa cum laude graduate of Harvard University, where he received a master's degree in 1968 and a doctorate in 1973, he joined the Stanford faculty in 1979 and held a joint appointment as a professor in the departments of philosophy and classics. Survivors include a sister in Columbia, Valerie Maione.Dr. David Miller, 80, an epidemiologist and son-in-law of the late Albert Schweitzer, died of lymphoma Thursday in Lavonia, Ga. He began working with Schweitzer in the 1960s at the Albert Schweitzer Hospital in Gabon, and in 1971 married the Nobel Peace Prize winner's only child, Rhena.
NEWS
By GLENN McNATT | November 27, 1993
Earlier this week one of the titans of the keyboard died, though her name probably is unfamiliar to most Americans. Tatiana Nikolayeva, the Russian-born pianist known for her inspired interpretations of the music of J.S. Bach and Dmitri Shostakovich, died of a cerebral aneurysm in San Francisco last Monday during her second American concert tour. She was 69.That Ms. Nikolayeva was relatively unknown to Western audiences almost certainly was due more to political than artistic obstacles. Unlike other Soviet artists who managed to emigrate to the West, she had to await the fall of communism before becoming known outside Russia.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Staff Writer | June 24, 1992
EASTON -- The Aspen Institute for Humanistic Studies, a think tank that moved its primary campus from Aspen, Colo. to Maryland in 1984, has begun a $16 million expansion of its facility in the Rocky Mountain resort town where it was founded more than 40 years ago.But the prestigious research institute's president says there are no plans to close or downsize its campus near Queenstown on the Wye River's banks."
NEWS
By DONALD R. MORRIS | January 11, 1992
The other night, at a social gathering of affluent, well-educated people, mostly in their 30s and 40s, the name Albert Schweitzer popped up, and someone asked ''Who?'' Some (the older) were aghast, several (the younger) indignant that not recognizing the name should be regarded as reprehensible, and the few able to identify the name did so with the smugness of a Trivial Pursuit player scoring a point.Reputations blossom and fade, but only the greatest of them achieve immortality and flourish forever.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer | October 30, 2003
Young and old alike Generations of creativity are featured in Golden Blessings of Old Age and Out of the Mouths of Babes, two exhibits at the American Visionary Art Museum. The more than 250 works by 50 artists include sculptures, paintings and drawings by senior artists and works by children who have experienced abuse, illness, war and hunger. The exhibit will run through Sept. 4. Admission is $9 for adults and $6 for seniors, students and children. The American Visionary Art Museum is at 800 Key Highway.
NEWS
October 2, 1990
A memorial service for Anna Young Dammann, a retired practical nurse who had done volunteer work in Haiti and at Dr. Albert Schweitzer's hospital in Africa, will be held at noon today at Grace and St. Peter's Episcopal Church, Park Avenue and Monument Street.Mrs. Dammann died of cancer Sept. 25 at her home on East 38th Street. She was 70.She retired nearly 10 years ago. She had worked in private duty nursing and at hospitals, principally Union Memorial. She began her nursing career in the mid-1960s after graduating from a practical nursing school at University Hospital.
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