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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | January 16, 1998
"A Grand Design" has been a mostly grand success.The exhibit of works from London's Victoria and Albert Museum opened Oct. 12 at the Baltimore Museum of Art and runs through Sunday. It has been the third-largest-drawing show in the museum's history, attracting 150,000 visitors, though it didn't quite reach the museum's projection of 170,000.The attendance leaders are the 1991-1992 show of works by Claude Monet from the Boston Museum of Fine Arts (215,000) and the 1996-1997 show of works by Andrew Wyeth (170,000)
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2011
In the 1990s, crowds packed the Walters Art Museum to see a touring show of artifacts from the reign of China's first emperor. They flocked as well to the Baltimore Museum of Art to see a collection from London's Victoria and Albert Museum. Those were the days of the so-called blockbusters, the traveling exhibits of high-profile art. The prevailing trend now at museums in Baltimore and across the country is to cut down on the number of touring shows. "They're expensive, and money is so tight," said Gary Vikan, director of the Walters Museum of Art. "We would have brought in two major shows in 2007-2008, but we couldn't afford it. " Museums aren't left with empty galleries, however.
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FEATURES
By Karin Remesch and Karin Remesch,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | July 20, 1997
The Baltimore Museum of Art will sponsor a job fair Aug. 4 to fill nearly 100 temporary staff positions in preparation for "A Grand Design: The Art of the Victoria and Albert Museum," an exhibition on display Oct. 12 through Jan. 18."A Grand Design" will include 250 works of art, most never before exhibited in North America.Temporary staff members are needed in a variety of departments. Applicants must be available Sept. 1 through Jan. 31 and be able to work a minimum of 18 hours per week on a flexible schedule.
NEWS
June 18, 2003
Henry Robin Ian Russell, 63, the 14th Duke of Bedford, a diffident British aristocrat who despite ill health combined a lucrative business career in London with successful management of his enormous family seat at Woburn Abbey in Bedfordshire, died Friday in London. He had recovered from strokes in 1988 and 2000. According to the London Sunday Times' 2003 list of the richest people in Britain, the 14th Duke of Bedford, who inherited the title in October, and his family are worth about $620 million.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | October 5, 1997
LONDON -- Just past the 16th-century statue of Samson slaying a Philistine is a glass case of Marvel's Krazy Kat comic books. Works by Raphael are in the next wing. Down the hall is a windup wooden tiger from India, a gold-and-lacquer Japanese picnic box and an enormous Elizabethan bed.If it is collectible, there's an excellent chance that London's Victoria and Albert Museum has collected it. Many, many examples of it. Whatever it is. So, you like silver spoons? The V&A has them.Shoes? Tapestries?
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1997
It is after hours at the Baltimore Museum of Art. The ticket window is closed. The day's visitors have gone home, and so have the volunteer tour guides.But a sort of art is being made.In a large gallery, designer Karen Nielsen is high above the floor in a cherry picker, tinkering with the lights. Curator Brenda Richardson stands below, contemplating the placement of several art objects. Since early summer, the two women and a team of staff members have been working nearly round-the-clock to install the museum's next exhibition.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | December 16, 1990
The comprehensive collection of Indian art and artifacts at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London is now displayed in the museum's new Nehru Gallery. The collection comprises 35,000 objects, some dating to 200 B.C.A representative selection of the collection, drawn from the period 1550 to 1900, is on permanent display and includes paintings, sculpture, textiles and decorative arts. Other work will be changed regularly.The permanent display focuses first on the establishment of the Mogul dynasty in the 16th century and moves on to show the effect of European colonial rule on Indian art. Indian music will be played and storytelling will take place occasionally in the raised central pavilion.
FEATURES
By Sylvia Badger | October 12, 1997
IT WAS AN AFFAIR befitting a queen! Limos deposited formally dressed guests at a marquee entrance, where a red carpet, complete with palace guards, led the way into the Baltimore Museum of Art.After 10 years of planning, "A Grand Design: The Art of the Victoria and Albert Museum" was beginning its run. Opening-nighters, 600 people at $600 each, enjoyed a tour, cocktails and dinner -- the largest seated dinner ever held at the museum. Guests were greeted by Tony Deering, chairman of the BMA; Lord Armstrong of Ilminster, chairman of the Victoria and Albert Museum; major sponsors Carl Pascarella, president and CEO of Visa USA, and Vance Coffman, CEO and vice chairman of Lockheed Martin; Alan Borg, director of the V&A Museum; and Arnold Lehman, former BMA director and now director of the Brooklyn Museum of Art, who came back for the opening of the show he had spent 10 years putting together.
NEWS
October 15, 1997
"A GRAND DESIGN: The Art of the Victoria and Albert Museum'' is one of the most ambitious museum shows in memory. Its 250-some objects, each of intense interest, collectively tell the story of the institution in London that largely defined the public museum. Subplots include how arts are made, the changing purposes of the museum and the transformations in taste dictating what is to be collected.The Museum of Manufactures grew out of the Great Exhibition of the Works of Industry of All Nations at the Crystal Palace -- a marvel of modern iron and glass design -- in Hyde Park, London, in 1851.
FEATURES
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 14, 1996
LONDON -- And then there's the gigantic plaster cast of Michelangelo's David. The one that comes complete with attachable fig leaf.That about sums up the Victoria and Albert Museum -- an amazing place with a rich and varied collection where anything goes.Raphael's Cartoons hang next door to Christian Dior's Bar suit. There's a Frank Lloyd Wright-designed plywood office. Without windows. There are Persian carpets, jewels from India, tables from China, armor from Japan, Wedgwood vases, Chippendale furniture and 4.5 million other items of decorative art spilling over 7 1/2 miles of galleries and hallways.
NEWS
By Julie Klavens and Julie Klavens,Sun Staff | February 24, 2002
Everyone should have, at least once, a room that is deliciously de trop: a fantastic, never-ending riot of pattern and color. And although the august firm Brunschwig & Fils might frown at having its posh wares described thus, no disrespect is intended -- a room in which patterns flow ceaselessly from furnishings to wallpaper to drapes is wonderfully over-the-top. Part of a typically B&F collection -- ornate, formal, beautiful -- the Karikal designs shown take their inspiration from 18th-century Indian palampore hangings.
TRAVEL
June 13, 1999
MY BEST SHOTAmiable AmsterdamMarlene Welty, CatonsvilleFriends from high school and I traveled to Amsterdam by train from Bremer-haven, Germany. It took five trains and about six hours to arrive. We loved the canals and the walkability of the city. The little green houses were charm-ing and the people were very friendly. We visited cheese farms and brought home some wonderful cheeses. We have fond memories of a beautiful city.READERS RECOMMEND...ArizonaJ.L. Bahlman, Baltimore"Spring is the perfect time to travel to northern Arizona.
FEATURES
By SUN STAFF | January 31, 1998
The departure next month of the Baltimore Museum of Art's chief curator portends a wave of change led by the museum's new director in the use of the staff, the presentation of the permanent collection and the institution's interactions with the community.Doreen Bolger, who on Feb. 17 officially takes her place as the museum's new director, aims to create a broad base of responsibility and authority within the museum's management to ensure that "everyone would have a voice," she says.Brenda Richardson, who was the BMA's deputy director and curator of modern painting and sculpture for 20 years, announced earlier this week that she would leave her post on Feb. 13. As the museum's No. 2 administrator, Richardson had enormous influence on both what the public saw within its galleries and on its relationship with the local arts community.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and John Dorsey and Holly Selby and John Dorsey,SUN STAFF | January 29, 1998
Longtime deputy director and chief curator Brenda Richardson will leave the Baltimore Museum of Art on Feb. 13, just four days before new director Doreen Bolger takes charge, the museum announced yesterday. Richardson's departure is part of an administrative restructuring by Bolger.Richardson, 55, has been the museum's No. 2 administrator for 23 years and was the curator of its key holding, the Cone Collection, and the author of a major scholarly work about its early modern paintings and sculptures.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | January 16, 1998
"A Grand Design" has been a mostly grand success.The exhibit of works from London's Victoria and Albert Museum opened Oct. 12 at the Baltimore Museum of Art and runs through Sunday. It has been the third-largest-drawing show in the museum's history, attracting 150,000 visitors, though it didn't quite reach the museum's projection of 170,000.The attendance leaders are the 1991-1992 show of works by Claude Monet from the Boston Museum of Fine Arts (215,000) and the 1996-1997 show of works by Andrew Wyeth (170,000)
NEWS
October 15, 1997
"A GRAND DESIGN: The Art of the Victoria and Albert Museum'' is one of the most ambitious museum shows in memory. Its 250-some objects, each of intense interest, collectively tell the story of the institution in London that largely defined the public museum. Subplots include how arts are made, the changing purposes of the museum and the transformations in taste dictating what is to be collected.The Museum of Manufactures grew out of the Great Exhibition of the Works of Industry of All Nations at the Crystal Palace -- a marvel of modern iron and glass design -- in Hyde Park, London, in 1851.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1996
The Baltimore Museum of Art will announce today its most ambitious and costly exhibition to date, an eclectic display of 255 art objects from the collections of London's renowned Victoria and Albert Museum.The exhibition -- which includes paintings, sculptures, examples of high fashion and decorative arts -- will open Oct. 12, 1997.It will remain at the BMA for three months before traveling to Boston, Toronto, Houston and San Francisco.Visitors will be able to see part of the Victoria and Albert's vast holdings, a collection that is, in effect, a portrait of the British Empire and of the instinct for acquiring objects.
NEWS
March 23, 1997
IN 18 YEARS under the direction of Arnold Lehman, the Baltimore Museum of Art has built a substantial endowment almost from scratch, doubled its viewing space and more than doubled its attendance. No need to ask why the Brooklyn Museum of Art hired him away.Mr. Lehman, a former New York official, will take over that city's second largest museum with a vast collection in triple the space of the Baltimore Museum of Art. But it has a marginally smaller endowment and substantially fewer visitors.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | October 12, 1997
From the tremendous to the tiny, the sublime to the silly, the demanding but rewarding exhibit "A Grand Design" has it all.A 19-foot-long Indian rug and an ivory box less than 2 inches high. A beautiful Chinese jade horse's head 2,000 years old and a hideous evening gown made last year. The plaster fig leaf hung strategically on the copy of Michelangelo's "David" whenever Queen Victoria came to call.Those and 251 other objects from London's Victoria and Albert Museum form the mammoth exhibit opening at the Baltimore Museum of Art today.
FEATURES
By Sylvia Badger | October 12, 1997
IT WAS AN AFFAIR befitting a queen! Limos deposited formally dressed guests at a marquee entrance, where a red carpet, complete with palace guards, led the way into the Baltimore Museum of Art.After 10 years of planning, "A Grand Design: The Art of the Victoria and Albert Museum" was beginning its run. Opening-nighters, 600 people at $600 each, enjoyed a tour, cocktails and dinner -- the largest seated dinner ever held at the museum. Guests were greeted by Tony Deering, chairman of the BMA; Lord Armstrong of Ilminster, chairman of the Victoria and Albert Museum; major sponsors Carl Pascarella, president and CEO of Visa USA, and Vance Coffman, CEO and vice chairman of Lockheed Martin; Alan Borg, director of the V&A Museum; and Arnold Lehman, former BMA director and now director of the Brooklyn Museum of Art, who came back for the opening of the show he had spent 10 years putting together.
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