Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAlbert King
IN THE NEWS

Albert King

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Daily News | December 23, 1992
Wayne Jackson of the Memphis Horns got it right when he said the late Albert King was "probably the most influential guitar player that ever lived."King, who died Monday at age 69 in Memphis, Tenn., after suffering a heart attack, was among the most-copied electric guitarists in history. His string-bending, razor-sharp riffs and feedback-drenched sound influenced three generations of blues and rock guitarists.B. B. King, who is no relation, said King "was a dear friend and a great guitarist.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 14, 2006
On February 11, 2006, RITA ANNA THORNTON (nee King); beloved wife of the late Edward P. Thornton; loving mother of Joseph Thornton and his wife Margaret, Rita Cain and her husband John, Catherine Kalista and her husband Joseph; dear sister of Catherine Brown and the late John King, Margaret Kirkbride and Albert King; adored grandmother of Donna, Julie, Teresa, Joseph, Karen, Michael and Edward. Also survived by 16 great-grandchildren. Friends may call at the family owned Mitchell-Wiedefeld Funeral Home Inc., 6500 York Road (at Overbrook)
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 30, 1991
LANDOVER -- When former Maryland star Albert King won his two-year battle to return to the NBA by surviving the Washington Bullets' final roster cuts yesterday, brother Bernard King was the first to congratulate him.Bernard, who is likely to miss the first month of the season while recuperating from his latest knee surgery, knows what it is like to beat the odds. He came back from a career-threatening knee injury with the New York Knicks in 1985 to average 28.4 points and regain All-Star status last season.
SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,SUN STAFF | May 9, 2002
As Lefty Driesell walked to the stage Friday night in College Park for his induction into the Maryland Athletic Hall of Fame, someone in the crowd shouted, "Give the V sign," in reference to one of his Cole Field House trademarks as coach of the Terrapins. Driesell said after the M Club ceremony: "I should have." After all, the night truly belonged to Driesell. He was given two standing ovations by the crowd of 400 who packed their way into the Inn & Conference Center on campus to honor Driesell and five others who were inducted into the Maryland Hall.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Sun Staff Correspondent | November 20, 1991
LANDOVER -- The Washington Bullets performed a quick juggling act with their 12-man roster last night, signing free-agent center Ralph Sampson and activating rookie guard LaBradford Smith, the No. 1 draft pick from Louisville, who spent the first 10 games on the injured list nursing a sore ankle.To make room, the Bullets waived free-agent forward Albert King and placed veteran forward Tom Hammonds, who had started the last four games, on the injured list.Hammonds, averaging a career-high 14 points, has been playing with a pulled groin muscle, which he aggravated Monday morning, when he fell heavily in practice.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez | February 26, 1993
Holly Springs,Miss. -- TWO or three times a month, the phone rings in R.L. Burnside's little farmhouse on Highway 4; calls from strangers asking if they can stop by to talk about the blues.The last time Mr. Burnside's phone jumped with a curious ring, the callers were pilgrims from Baltimore."Sure, I remember you," said the 66-year-old guitarist who learned his lessons by watching Mississippi Fred McDowell and Muddy Waters. "Come on over."I had met "Rule" Burnside once before, when he played at the Cat's Eye Pub on Thames Street in May 1986.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 6, 1991
EMMITSBURG -- It is one of those inspirational stories favored by Hollywood scriptwriters, but the way the plot line is developing in the Washington Bullets' training camp, it is conceivable that Albert King will replace his older brother as the starting small forward this season.Bernard King, who led the Bullets in scoring and was an NBA All-Star selection last season, will likely not return to action until December after arthroscopic surgery on his right knee last month. But he was here for the opening of training camp, cheering on Albert as he easily outdistanced the other 15 Bullets candidates competing in the annual 1 1/2 -mile run."
NEWS
By RAFAEL ALVAREZ | June 28, 1992
When you go out-of-town to say farewell to a friend who is moving half-way around the world, you have to fill the space between hello and goodbye.There are always blues enough for any hole.Allie Scott is going away, Bangkok-bound, and Johnny Shines is a long time gone, dead at 76 in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, this spring.When does it end?When they throw the dirt over you.Maybe not even then.(Not even then).Alwyn C. Scott is a 29-year-old short-story writer and newspaperman working for the Associated Press on Wall Street, soon to be dispatched to Thailand to write about the rise and fall of numbers and the things people trade for money.
NEWS
February 14, 2006
On February 11, 2006, RITA ANNA THORNTON (nee King); beloved wife of the late Edward P. Thornton; loving mother of Joseph Thornton and his wife Margaret, Rita Cain and her husband John, Catherine Kalista and her husband Joseph; dear sister of Catherine Brown and the late John King, Margaret Kirkbride and Albert King; adored grandmother of Donna, Julie, Teresa, Joseph, Karen, Michael and Edward. Also survived by 16 great-grandchildren. Friends may call at the family owned Mitchell-Wiedefeld Funeral Home Inc., 6500 York Road (at Overbrook)
SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,SUN STAFF | May 9, 2002
As Lefty Driesell walked to the stage Friday night in College Park for his induction into the Maryland Athletic Hall of Fame, someone in the crowd shouted, "Give the V sign," in reference to one of his Cole Field House trademarks as coach of the Terrapins. Driesell said after the M Club ceremony: "I should have." After all, the night truly belonged to Driesell. He was given two standing ovations by the crowd of 400 who packed their way into the Inn & Conference Center on campus to honor Driesell and five others who were inducted into the Maryland Hall.
SPORTS
March 30, 2002
Game 1: Oklahoma vs. Indiana Time: 6:07 p.m. TV: Chs. 13,9 Line: Oklahoma by 7 The Sooners appear to be the stronger team, but the Hoosiers have been full of surprises so far in the tournament. Page 10 Game 2: Mayalnd vs. Kansas Time: 8:47 p.m. TV: Chs. 13,9 Line: Kansas by 1 1/2 Page 3 On a mission One year after losing in the Final Four, a focused, veteran Maryland team aims to atone with a national championship. Page 4 The coaches Gary Williams and Roy Williams are two of the top coaches in the college game.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | March 18, 2002
WASHINGTON -- The moment came with 4:09 left in the first half, and Juan Dixon was too busy sizing up Wisconsin to notice. All season, Dixon had been chasing the late Len Bias on the University of Maryland's all-time scoring list. When Dixon made his first three-pointer yesterday to give the Terps a 32-25 lead in an 87-57 rout of the Badgers, he had reached 2,150 career points and stood alone. "Coming into this school, a lot of people knocked Coach [Gary] Williams for recruiting me. I had a lot of critics," Dixon said.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun Staff Writer | March 15, 1995
COLLEGE PARK -- The remarkable legend of Joe Smith grew even larger yesterday.In a matter of hours, the 6-foot-10 Maryland center was named the Atlantic Coast Conference's Player of the Year as well as a first-team All-American by the Associated Press.Smith became only the third Terrapin and third sophomore in ACC history to be named the Player of the Year, following two-time winner Len Bias (1985, 1986) and Albert King (1981) in the first category, as well as Ralph Sampson (1981) and David Thompson (1973)
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez | February 26, 1993
Holly Springs,Miss. -- TWO or three times a month, the phone rings in R.L. Burnside's little farmhouse on Highway 4; calls from strangers asking if they can stop by to talk about the blues.The last time Mr. Burnside's phone jumped with a curious ring, the callers were pilgrims from Baltimore."Sure, I remember you," said the 66-year-old guitarist who learned his lessons by watching Mississippi Fred McDowell and Muddy Waters. "Come on over."I had met "Rule" Burnside once before, when he played at the Cat's Eye Pub on Thames Street in May 1986.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Daily News | December 23, 1992
Wayne Jackson of the Memphis Horns got it right when he said the late Albert King was "probably the most influential guitar player that ever lived."King, who died Monday at age 69 in Memphis, Tenn., after suffering a heart attack, was among the most-copied electric guitarists in history. His string-bending, razor-sharp riffs and feedback-drenched sound influenced three generations of blues and rock guitarists.B. B. King, who is no relation, said King "was a dear friend and a great guitarist.
NEWS
By RAFAEL ALVAREZ | June 28, 1992
When you go out-of-town to say farewell to a friend who is moving half-way around the world, you have to fill the space between hello and goodbye.There are always blues enough for any hole.Allie Scott is going away, Bangkok-bound, and Johnny Shines is a long time gone, dead at 76 in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, this spring.When does it end?When they throw the dirt over you.Maybe not even then.(Not even then).Alwyn C. Scott is a 29-year-old short-story writer and newspaperman working for the Associated Press on Wall Street, soon to be dispatched to Thailand to write about the rise and fall of numbers and the things people trade for money.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | March 18, 2002
WASHINGTON -- The moment came with 4:09 left in the first half, and Juan Dixon was too busy sizing up Wisconsin to notice. All season, Dixon had been chasing the late Len Bias on the University of Maryland's all-time scoring list. When Dixon made his first three-pointer yesterday to give the Terps a 32-25 lead in an 87-57 rout of the Badgers, he had reached 2,150 career points and stood alone. "Coming into this school, a lot of people knocked Coach [Gary] Williams for recruiting me. I had a lot of critics," Dixon said.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Evening Sun Staff | October 4, 1991
EMMITSBURG -- Albert King sat on the Memorial Gym floor, diligently going through his 20-minute stretching routine, a regimen he has followed since high school. The first day of the Washington Bullets' preseason camp, he was by himself. Yesterday, he had a little company. Today, it will be more."As this camp gets harder, more and more guys will be out here with me," says the former University of Maryland and New Jersey Nets star, with a laugh. "Each day when you wake up the pain is worse.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Sun Staff Correspondent | November 20, 1991
LANDOVER -- The Washington Bullets performed a quick juggling act with their 12-man roster last night, signing free-agent center Ralph Sampson and activating rookie guard LaBradford Smith, the No. 1 draft pick from Louisville, who spent the first 10 games on the injured list nursing a sore ankle.To make room, the Bullets waived free-agent forward Albert King and placed veteran forward Tom Hammonds, who had started the last four games, on the injured list.Hammonds, averaging a career-high 14 points, has been playing with a pulled groin muscle, which he aggravated Monday morning, when he fell heavily in practice.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Evening Sun Staff | November 1, 1991
Washington general manager John Nash knows inquiring Bullets fans want to know:* Why the team didn't unload John Williams at the end of last season when he was in something resembling NBA shape?"
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.