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By Carrie Rickey and Carrie Rickey,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 6, 2004
NEW YORK - As Albert Finney sees it, there's a fundamental difference between him, a robust bull barreling into a Gotham hotel suite, and the tall-tale spinner he plays in Tim Burton's new film Big Fish. "I live stories rather than tell them," exclaims Finney, a lusty 67, the best-known British actor never to win an Oscar. He's likely to snag yet another nomination for his salty turn as the fantasist father of a realist son in Burton's fractured fairy tale, which goes into wide release Friday.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 9, 2007
Sibling rivalry replaces the romantic triangle as the pop-culture mainstay in the week's most-hyped openings - a botched Yuletide comedy and a deliberately excruciating thriller. In each, a roly-poly brother who appears to have his life and career under control ropes his scrawnier, seedier sibling into an insane enterprise that threatens to go kaput long before the final curtain. Before The Devil Knows You're Dead (THINKfilm) Starring Philip Seymour Hoffman, Ethan Hawke, Marisa Tomei, Albert Finney.
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By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Sun | December 1, 2006
Bay Theatre Company opens A Man of No Importance today, the second musical in the troupe's four-year history. The reasons, said company co-founder and artistic director Lucinda Merry-Browne: The cost is significantly higher than the typical show's budget of $20,000 to $30,000, and the 11-member cast is as big as the stage can comfortably accommodate. However, this show was irresistible. "This is a beautiful, uplifting show celebrating love in all forms with 24 lilting musical numbers brought to life by music director Anita O'Connor and choreographer Jen Kohlhafer," Merry-Browne said.
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By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Sun | December 1, 2006
Bay Theatre Company opens A Man of No Importance today, the second musical in the troupe's four-year history. The reasons, said company co-founder and artistic director Lucinda Merry-Browne: The cost is significantly higher than the typical show's budget of $20,000 to $30,000, and the 11-member cast is as big as the stage can comfortably accommodate. However, this show was irresistible. "This is a beautiful, uplifting show celebrating love in all forms with 24 lilting musical numbers brought to life by music director Anita O'Connor and choreographer Jen Kohlhafer," Merry-Browne said.
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By Marilyn McCraven and Marilyn McCraven,SUN STAFF | June 12, 1996
A few weeks ago, Duane Chadwick was working in her back yard in Union Square when Hollywood came calling.It seems that the home and garden she and her husband, Jack, have lovingly cared for evoke a pre-Civil War flavor that's perfect for the movie "Washington Square."The Chadwicks and all of Union Square ended up welcoming the production crew to the Southwest Baltimore neighborhood, hoping that Hollywood attention will make local people -- especially city government -- enthusiastic about historic preservation again.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 10, 2006
Ideal cold-weather entertainment - that's the best to be said about A Good Year, starring Russell Crowe as a ruthless London bond trader who inherits a chateau and vineyard in Provence from his uncle (Albert Finney) and rediscovers his soul. In some ways, Fox has been advertising this movie the way MGM sold Ninotchka - instead of proclaiming "Garbo Laughs!" the poster shots prove that Russell Crowe can grin. I still root for Crowe; he's got untapped versatility and complexity. It's good to see him acting goofy after the toil of Cinderella Man. But the comic spirit doesn't possess him here the way it did in Rough Magic 10 years ago, the way it does Finney and young Freddie Highmore (playing Crowe as a kid)
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 9, 2007
Sibling rivalry replaces the romantic triangle as the pop-culture mainstay in the week's most-hyped openings - a botched Yuletide comedy and a deliberately excruciating thriller. In each, a roly-poly brother who appears to have his life and career under control ropes his scrawnier, seedier sibling into an insane enterprise that threatens to go kaput long before the final curtain. Before The Devil Knows You're Dead (THINKfilm) Starring Philip Seymour Hoffman, Ethan Hawke, Marisa Tomei, Albert Finney.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | May 8, 1992
Small towns must be the same the world over, and the Redhills of County Cavan, Ireland, in "The Playboys," which opens today at the Rotunda, reminded me of nothing so much as the Anarene of Texas, America, in "The Last Picture Show". Both are bitter places, stewing in their own bubbling broth of envy and avarice and nosiness and lust, run by smug gentry and filled with kids who just ache to get out.The movie indeed might be called "The Last Stage Show," because it's an account of the effect a small traveling theater troupe has on the place in the mid-'50s, just as the bland beams of television were about to mill most of the regional uniqueness out of such places forever.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | May 8, 1992
Small towns must be the same the world over, and the Redhills of County Cavan, Ireland, in "The Playboys," which opens today at the Rotunda, reminded me of nothing so much as the Anarene of Texas, America, in "The Last Picture Show." Both are bitterSmall towns must be the same the world over, and the Redhills of County Cavan, Ireland, in "The Playboys," which opens today at the Rotunda, reminded me of nothing so much as the Anarene of Texas, America, in "The Last Picture Show." Both are bitter places, stewing in their own bubbling broth of envy and avarice and nosiness and lust, run by smug gentry and filled with kids who just ache to get out.The movie indeed might be called "The Last Stage Show," because it's an account of the effect a small traveling theater troupe has on the place in the mid-50s, just as the bland beams of television were about to mill most of the regional uniqueness out of such places forever.
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By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | October 19, 1990
IF YOU thought ''GoodFellas'' was violent, wait until you see ''Miller's Crossing.'' When it comes to bloodshed, this one has the Martin Scorsese film beat a mile.That, however, is about the only area in which the new film beats the Scorsese film. Its trouble is that it isn't able to settle on any particular mood. It wants to be brutal and is. It also wants to be funny and is not.''GoodFellas'' is funny, in part, but the humor is the natural sort. The humor in ''Miller's Crossing'' is self-conscious, contrived and never that successful.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 10, 2006
Ideal cold-weather entertainment - that's the best to be said about A Good Year, starring Russell Crowe as a ruthless London bond trader who inherits a chateau and vineyard in Provence from his uncle (Albert Finney) and rediscovers his soul. In some ways, Fox has been advertising this movie the way MGM sold Ninotchka - instead of proclaiming "Garbo Laughs!" the poster shots prove that Russell Crowe can grin. I still root for Crowe; he's got untapped versatility and complexity. It's good to see him acting goofy after the toil of Cinderella Man. But the comic spirit doesn't possess him here the way it did in Rough Magic 10 years ago, the way it does Finney and young Freddie Highmore (playing Crowe as a kid)
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 9, 2004
Watching Big Fish brings audiences the lighter-than-air euphoria of seeing a flat expanse of nylon expand into a soaring balloon, but it isn't just one more Tim Burton trip movie. This picture boasts a story about a yarn-spinning Southern father (Albert Finney) and a sober-sided son (Billy Crudup) that gives it ballast and staying power beyond anything in previous, precious Burton fables like Edward Scissorhands or Ed Wood. The central figure is yet another Edward, with the surname Bloom.
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By Carrie Rickey and Carrie Rickey,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 6, 2004
NEW YORK - As Albert Finney sees it, there's a fundamental difference between him, a robust bull barreling into a Gotham hotel suite, and the tall-tale spinner he plays in Tim Burton's new film Big Fish. "I live stories rather than tell them," exclaims Finney, a lusty 67, the best-known British actor never to win an Oscar. He's likely to snag yet another nomination for his salty turn as the fantasist father of a realist son in Burton's fractured fairy tale, which goes into wide release Friday.
FEATURES
March 17, 2000
Let us now praise simple stories well told. "Erin Brockovich" is so disarmingly, deceivingly straightforward that it's almost jarring. Even more surprising, this unassuming movie comes from Steven Soderbergh, who has lent style and narrative complexity to such films as "Out of Sight" and "The Limey." Through the intrinsic power of his central character, brought to life by Julia Roberts, in her meatiest role and most accomplished performance yet, he has created the most unexpected movie of a career devoted to counter-intuitive turns: a mainstream Hollywood star vehicle.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 2, 1999
One is a well-heeled, hard-drinking, stiff upper-lip of a ladies' man. The other is a quiet, deferential and decent retired milkman.They come together tomorrow night on PBS in a lovely, bittersweet odd-couple drama titled "A Rather English Marriage," starring Albert Finney ("Two for the Road"), Tom Courtenay ("The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner") and Joanna Lumley ("Absolutely Fabulous")."A Rather English Marriage" launches "Masterpiece Theatre" on its 29th season, and it is a rather perfect send-off.
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 17, 1997
"Washington Square," Agnieszka Holland's adaptation of the Henry James novel, starts out with a long, lovely crane shot that sends a tip-toeing camera from a jewel-like park, through a townhouse window, up a narrow staircase and into a bedchamber. It's an exhilarating beginning, but one that belies what is to come, which is a series of stale, static scenes that capture the details of 19th-century life but endow the characters with about as much energy as wax fruit.This lavishly appointed, well-upholstered and largely lifeless production suffers from that all-too-common ailment of films with earnest aspirations.
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By Stephen Hunter MOVIES Olmos directs, stars in 'American Me' | March 14, 1992
VIDEO'Tom Jones' at lastProbably the only great film not yet on video at last makes it to tape. That's Tony Richardson's exuberant "Tom Jones," with Albert Finney (whom it made a star) in the title role. From Henry Fielding's novel, it's a raucous, raunchy look at 18th century England, a place of both high morals and high jinx. Tony Richardson directed. It won Best Film Oscar in 1963."American Me" is extremely violent, but possibly necessary. Edward James Olmos directed himself in this story of a brilliant Hispanic-American whose rise and fall in the drug trade is a cautionary tale for anyone willing to listen.
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By Stephen Hunter | December 30, 1990
THUMBS UP (Listed in no particular order) "To Sleep With Anger," Charles Burnett's heartfelt fable of thblack middle class struggling with the difficulties and temptations of American culture."
NEWS
By Marilyn McCraven and Marilyn McCraven,SUN STAFF | June 12, 1996
A few weeks ago, Duane Chadwick was working in her back yard in Union Square when Hollywood came calling.It seems that the home and garden she and her husband, Jack, have lovingly cared for evoke a pre-Civil War flavor that's perfect for the movie "Washington Square."The Chadwicks and all of Union Square ended up welcoming the production crew to the Southwest Baltimore neighborhood, hoping that Hollywood attention will make local people -- especially city government -- enthusiastic about historic preservation again.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | May 8, 1992
Small towns must be the same the world over, and the Redhills of County Cavan, Ireland, in "The Playboys," which opens today at the Rotunda, reminded me of nothing so much as the Anarene of Texas, America, in "The Last Picture Show". Both are bitter places, stewing in their own bubbling broth of envy and avarice and nosiness and lust, run by smug gentry and filled with kids who just ache to get out.The movie indeed might be called "The Last Stage Show," because it's an account of the effect a small traveling theater troupe has on the place in the mid-'50s, just as the bland beams of television were about to mill most of the regional uniqueness out of such places forever.
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