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Albert Einstein

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By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | December 23, 1999
He was the original absent-minded professor -- famed as a mathematical wizard from the age of 26, yet so forgetful he once had to ask directions to his home, and he was concerned enough about neighborhood kids to help them with their math homework.That is the humanity of Albert Einstein, the parts usually left behind when people think about the man who has become this century's idea of genius. And that's the part of Einstein that Ed Metzger introduces to audiences in his one-man play "Einstein: the Practical Bohemian."
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By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 17, 2011
Thomas Fulton, a longtime physics professor at the Johns Hopkins University who swapped notes with the great minds of science, died of heart failure on April 8 at his daughter's home in Ruxton. He was 83. Born Tamas Feuerzeug, in Budapest, Hungary, he immigrated to the United States with his family in 1941 at the age of 14. His immediate family fled Nazis in Hungary and Germany, where many of his other family members died in the Holocaust, and traveled to fascist Spain, where he secured three boat tickets to Cuba by borrowing $100 from a British consular official.
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By Jon Anderson and Jon Anderson,Chicago Tribune | August 10, 1994
According to this biography, Albert Einstein, the father of relativity, was neither a good father nor a good relative, but he was certainly quick with a maxim. "Life," Einstein once advised his son, Eduard, who had been hospitalized with a mental disorder, "is like a bicycle. You have to keep moving or you lose your balance."Growing up with a famous parent is seldom easy, perhaps because the stars in any field, even physics, tend to be self-absorbed. His European friends called Einstein (1879-1955)
NEWS
By Douglas MacKinnon | September 4, 2009
One of President Barack Obama's favorite quotes - which is attributed to Albert Einstein - wisely reminds us, "Insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results." Some on the far left and some in the media prove Einstein's point on a daily or weekly basis with their continuous assaults against former Vice President Dick Cheney and his single-minded desire to protect our nation from nuclear, biological or chemical attack at the hands of terrorists. The latest onslaught from the left against Mr. Cheney has come because he dares to vocalize that Central Intelligence Agency interrogators actually protected our nation from additional terrorist attacks.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2007
What's the point? -- Certainly, you've seen "WASH ME" or other, less-printable phrases written in the dust on the back of a car or truck. Artist Scott Wade saw the layer of dust on his back windshield as an empty canvas, instead, and this site showcases his works. What to look for --Take a gander at the gallery, which shows a version of Mona Lisa, a portrait of Albert Einstein and more etched into the dirt on Wade's car. Some photos chronicle how the elements (weather, sap, his cat) changed the portraits over time.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | May 30, 1994
OSAKA, Japan -- There are at least two reasons why the man who unlocked the secrets of the atom might not be an honored hero in Japan: Hiroshima and Nagasaki.But don't tell that to a mathematics professor at Kinki University, who has spent most of his adult life chasing down the hidden mystery of Albert Einstein. Not his theories, mind you, but his brain.Late last year, he finally found it. The brain, or at least what was left of it, was in Lawrence, Kan., floating in a formaldehyde-filled jar owned by the pathologist who performed Einstein's autopsy.
NEWS
September 3, 2005
Ernesta Drinker Ballard, 85, a founding member of the National Organization for Women and a horticulturist who helped build the Philadelphia Flower Show into a world-renowned event, has died in Philadelphia. Ms. Ballard died of complications after a stroke on Aug. 11, her family said. Heavily involved in feminist and civic causes, Ms. Ballard marched on Washington, lobbied for the Equal Rights Amendment, and raised money for female candidates. She also was a founding member of the National Abortion and Reproductive Rights Action League, and was chairwoman of NARAL from 1989 to 1991.
NEWS
July 25, 2001
4Kids: Featured site of the month PEACE IN THE GARDEN Take a virtual tour of Anderson Gardens at www.andersongardens.org. Located in Rockford, Ill., these Japanese gardens were inspired by the founder's 1966 trip to Japan. Begin your tour at the Wisteria Arbor. Visit the beautiful waterfalls, granite pagoda and zigzag bridge. Chat for a bit with the stone raccoons, and have tea at the tea house. Once you've completed your journey, stop by the Anderson Center where you can learn more about Japanese studies and horticulture.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck VIDEO Fast break to comedy | August 29, 1992
THEATERPlaywrights FestivalThe Baltimore Playwrights Festival wraps up this weekend with the final performances of Joe Dennison's "A Short Simple Stay" and Mark Berman's "Albert Einstein Never Sang at the Met." The former focuses on a sailor who encounters a woman of mystery in the Philippines; despite spending more time on atmosphere than conflict, it gets under your skin. The latter offers an affectionate look an eccentric, but sitcom-y, 1950s family. Show times for both are today at 8:30 p.m. and tomorrow at 7 p.m. "A Short Simple Stay" is being presented at Fells Point Corner Theatre, 251 S. Ann St. Tickets are $8. Call (410)
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By KEVIN COWHERD and KEVIN COWHERD,SUN COLUMNIST | June 26, 2006
As if life weren't tough enough, here's a news flash to grind you down a little further: The dead make more money than you do. This comes to us courtesy of the July Forbes magazine, in an article tastefully titled "Top-Earning Dead Celebs." No. 1 on the Forbes "Dead, Buried And Still Rolling in It" list is Elvis Presley. The King, as everyone knows, has been pushing up daisies for nearly three decades. But according to the magazine, he still made $52 million last year - or at least his estate did, from song rights, Graceland tours and all the rest.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2007
What's the point? -- Certainly, you've seen "WASH ME" or other, less-printable phrases written in the dust on the back of a car or truck. Artist Scott Wade saw the layer of dust on his back windshield as an empty canvas, instead, and this site showcases his works. What to look for --Take a gander at the gallery, which shows a version of Mona Lisa, a portrait of Albert Einstein and more etched into the dirt on Wade's car. Some photos chronicle how the elements (weather, sap, his cat) changed the portraits over time.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD and KEVIN COWHERD,SUN COLUMNIST | June 26, 2006
As if life weren't tough enough, here's a news flash to grind you down a little further: The dead make more money than you do. This comes to us courtesy of the July Forbes magazine, in an article tastefully titled "Top-Earning Dead Celebs." No. 1 on the Forbes "Dead, Buried And Still Rolling in It" list is Elvis Presley. The King, as everyone knows, has been pushing up daisies for nearly three decades. But according to the magazine, he still made $52 million last year - or at least his estate did, from song rights, Graceland tours and all the rest.
NEWS
September 3, 2005
Ernesta Drinker Ballard, 85, a founding member of the National Organization for Women and a horticulturist who helped build the Philadelphia Flower Show into a world-renowned event, has died in Philadelphia. Ms. Ballard died of complications after a stroke on Aug. 11, her family said. Heavily involved in feminist and civic causes, Ms. Ballard marched on Washington, lobbied for the Equal Rights Amendment, and raised money for female candidates. She also was a founding member of the National Abortion and Reproductive Rights Action League, and was chairwoman of NARAL from 1989 to 1991.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | October 15, 2003
Milton Garfunkel has no idea why he has lived to be 99, but finds it curious that his elder sister died at 102 and two brothers lived until they were 92 and 90. All he knows is that aside from bad knees that he blames on many years of handball, he feels fabulous. "I think I can be 120, the way I feel," says Garfunkel, a retired salesman who lives independently with his wife, Peggy, in Yonkers, N.Y. Peggy is 95 and isn't concerned about why she's lived so long. "Why?" she asks rhetorically.
NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 1, 2003
Did you know that Albert Einstein ran into Pablo Picasso in a bistro in Paris in 1904? And that they had a long conversation about life and love, talent and genius with the other patrons and the couple who owned the bar? Hard to imagine? Steve Martin could and did imagine it, in a funny and intelligent play called Picasso at the Lapin Agile. A Student-Alumni Arts production of the comedian's one-acter - it runs about 90 minutes - is being performed through May 11 in Howard Community College's Theatre Outback.
NEWS
July 25, 2001
4Kids: Featured site of the month PEACE IN THE GARDEN Take a virtual tour of Anderson Gardens at www.andersongardens.org. Located in Rockford, Ill., these Japanese gardens were inspired by the founder's 1966 trip to Japan. Begin your tour at the Wisteria Arbor. Visit the beautiful waterfalls, granite pagoda and zigzag bridge. Chat for a bit with the stone raccoons, and have tea at the tea house. Once you've completed your journey, stop by the Anderson Center where you can learn more about Japanese studies and horticulture.
FEATURES
By Knight Ridder/Tribune | August 13, 1998
Today, if you're right, you're also wrong.Today is the day to be left and proud. It's International Left-handers Day.International Left-handers Day was started by the now-defunct Lefthanders International, and first celebrated on Friday, Aug. 13, 1976.That day was chosen to counter the superstitions about left-handers and continues to be celebrated by some left-handers.After all, scientists say that if you are right-handed, the left side of your brain is in control, whereas if you are left-handed, it's vice versa -- leading to the inescapable conclusion that left-handers are the only ones who are in their right minds.
NEWS
By CRAIG EISENDRATH and CRAIG EISENDRATH,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 30, 1997
"Albert Einstein: A Biography," by Albrecht Folsing. Viking. 878 pages. $37.95.Albert Einstein once said, "What is essential in the life of a man of my kind lies in what he thinks and how he thinks, and not in what he does or suffers." As an expositor of Einstein's scientific ideas, Albrecht Folsing, who has previously published biographies in German of Galileo and Rontgen, is hopeless, lacking flair for images, modeling, metaphor or logic.Folsing is equally inept as a portraitist. The major scientists in Einstein's early years, Ernst Mach, Clerk Maxwell, H.A. Lorenz and Max Planck; and later Niels Bohr, Erwin Schrodinger and Enrico Fermi, never achieve human form.
NEWS
By Jonathan Gelb and Jonathan Gelb,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 30, 2001
PHILADELPHIA - In a bland, windowless room at the nation's oldest historically black college, amid stacks of moldering files and sheaves of tattered papers, Ed Gibson makes history. Literally. One of two archivists at Lincoln University, Gibson sifts methodically through 65 musty boxes of lost letters, worn books and wilted posters that bring to life black history in the Philadelphia region and the nation. Like a scavenger, he picks through papers one by one and indexes documents for students and scholars.
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