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Albert Camus

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By Richard Eder and Richard Eder,Los Angeles Times | September 10, 1995
"The First Man," by Albert Camus, translated from the French by David Hapgood. New York: Alfred A. Knopf. 336 pages. $23.Albert Camus, the French writer and Nobel Prize winner, died in 1960 when he crashed his car. In the wrecked car was the incomplete first part of what, clearly, was a much larger project, an autobiographical novel. His son and daughter have now edited and published that manuscript.To read it is to visit a tomb and find that a spring is bubbling from it. One of the themes is a search for the father who was killed in World War I a few months after Camus was born; another is a rending, brilliant evocation of the long-submerged claims that Algeria's harsh landscape and history exert on him. A third is a joyfully vivid re-creation of a childhood in the teeming port of Algiers in the 1930s, a childhood constrained by poverty but wonderfully free in exploration and sensuous discovery.
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NEWS
By Steve Gimbel | March 31, 2014
The dawn of the baseball season is an existential moment. For big market teams with owners willing to pay for marquee players, and general managers who build playoff-bound teams, it is a time of great anticipation. It's also a time of hope, albeit dim, for those die-hard fans of teams who are off the playoff pace by double digits year in and year out. Their cautious optimism is one that illuminates the human condition. French philosopher Albert Camus contended that life is absurd, that most of us are like the Greek tragic figure Sisyphus, who was condemned to roll a huge boulder up a mountain, only to have it roll back down as he reached the top. The essence of humanity, Camus argued, is in the moment where Sisyphus turns around to see the boulder once again at the bottom of the hill knowing he must trudge down to his toil once more, aware that this effort will again be both great and futile.
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NEWS
January 13, 2008
Thomas Quinn, director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Global Health and an infectious diseases specialist, on books that influenced his choice of profession: "The Plague" / by Albert Camus / Penguin Classics / 256 pages/ $14.95 He writes from the perspective of a healer, whose occupation was to try and prevent disease. "The Great Influenza" / by John M. Barry / Penguin Group / 546 pages / $29.95 Shows what a pandemic can really do. As we worry about avian influenza, this is a fantastic book that really provides a historical perspective on medical epidemics.
NEWS
By Ryan Bloom | April 6, 2008
The last time I saw my grandmother, she was lying in a hospital bed, mostly still, no longer talking very much. I was 11, and all I really knew about my grandmother was that, first, I loved the little bonbons she used to ply me with, and second, she had a funny accent. I loved her, as many children love their grandparents, but I didn't yet know her. During that last visit, when my father left the room to speak with one of the doctors, my grandmother rolled her head on the pillow so her piercing blue eyes were staring straight into mine and began speaking, rapid fire, in what at the time I could only discern as rhythmic gibberish.
NEWS
By Ryan Bloom | April 6, 2008
The last time I saw my grandmother, she was lying in a hospital bed, mostly still, no longer talking very much. I was 11, and all I really knew about my grandmother was that, first, I loved the little bonbons she used to ply me with, and second, she had a funny accent. I loved her, as many children love their grandparents, but I didn't yet know her. During that last visit, when my father left the room to speak with one of the doctors, my grandmother rolled her head on the pillow so her piercing blue eyes were staring straight into mine and began speaking, rapid fire, in what at the time I could only discern as rhythmic gibberish.
NEWS
By Steve Gimbel | March 31, 2014
The dawn of the baseball season is an existential moment. For big market teams with owners willing to pay for marquee players, and general managers who build playoff-bound teams, it is a time of great anticipation. It's also a time of hope, albeit dim, for those die-hard fans of teams who are off the playoff pace by double digits year in and year out. Their cautious optimism is one that illuminates the human condition. French philosopher Albert Camus contended that life is absurd, that most of us are like the Greek tragic figure Sisyphus, who was condemned to roll a huge boulder up a mountain, only to have it roll back down as he reached the top. The essence of humanity, Camus argued, is in the moment where Sisyphus turns around to see the boulder once again at the bottom of the hill knowing he must trudge down to his toil once more, aware that this effort will again be both great and futile.
FEATURES
By Michael Kenney and Michael Kenney,Boston Globe | August 28, 1994
The winter of 1946-47 was a bitter one in Europe. Three years after liberation, Paris was still the "two cities" decried by the influential communist press -- "the Paris of nauseating luxury . . . and the other Paris."Paris had rapidly regained its prewar status as the capital of culture and style. In February, while "the other Paris" was shivering in its unheated apartments -- coal barges had been icebound on frozen rivers -- Christian Dior introduced his "New Look," fashions extravagant in their use of fabrics.
NEWS
By John O'Mara | April 28, 2003
BEIJING - The mood in Beijing has shifted from benign resignation before the SARS epidemic to something bordering on panic in a remarkably short time. The revelation of what everyone knew anyway - that the government has been covering up the true extent of the problem - is probably what set things off. All of the schools around the city have closed, and some companies are offering employees the option of working from home or altering their schedules to avoid the rush-hour jam, or are closing.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 5, 2003
To Down Under director Gregor Jordan, his tart, engrossing Buffalo Soldiers, based on Robert O'Connor's novel, boasts a universal-soldier kind of story. Bristling with black comedy, it centers on an arms-for-heroin deal that takes shape on a U.S. Army base in Germany right before Berliners tear down their wall. Over the phone four months ago, Jordan said he could have set plots similar to the one he derived from O'Connor's book in the Chinese, Russian, British or Australian armies. When he grew up on Australian air force bases, he knew that bad behavior was bubbling beneath the surface all around him. (His father was a pilot in Vietnam.
NEWS
July 21, 1998
James Flora, 84, a noted children's author and one of the first artists to design and illustrate record album covers, died July 9 in Norwalk, Conn. His children's books included "The Fabulous Fireworks Family," "The Day the Cow Sneezed," "Charlie Yup and his Snip-Snap Boys" and "Wanda and the Bumbly Wizard."Roger Quilliot, 73, a former French government minister and expert on the writings of Albert Camus, killed himself Friday in Paris. His wife, Claire, also tried to kill herself and was hospitalized, the daily Le Monde newspaper reported Sunday.
NEWS
January 13, 2008
Thomas Quinn, director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Global Health and an infectious diseases specialist, on books that influenced his choice of profession: "The Plague" / by Albert Camus / Penguin Classics / 256 pages/ $14.95 He writes from the perspective of a healer, whose occupation was to try and prevent disease. "The Great Influenza" / by John M. Barry / Penguin Group / 546 pages / $29.95 Shows what a pandemic can really do. As we worry about avian influenza, this is a fantastic book that really provides a historical perspective on medical epidemics.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 5, 2003
To Down Under director Gregor Jordan, his tart, engrossing Buffalo Soldiers, based on Robert O'Connor's novel, boasts a universal-soldier kind of story. Bristling with black comedy, it centers on an arms-for-heroin deal that takes shape on a U.S. Army base in Germany right before Berliners tear down their wall. Over the phone four months ago, Jordan said he could have set plots similar to the one he derived from O'Connor's book in the Chinese, Russian, British or Australian armies. When he grew up on Australian air force bases, he knew that bad behavior was bubbling beneath the surface all around him. (His father was a pilot in Vietnam.
NEWS
By John O'Mara | April 28, 2003
BEIJING - The mood in Beijing has shifted from benign resignation before the SARS epidemic to something bordering on panic in a remarkably short time. The revelation of what everyone knew anyway - that the government has been covering up the true extent of the problem - is probably what set things off. All of the schools around the city have closed, and some companies are offering employees the option of working from home or altering their schedules to avoid the rush-hour jam, or are closing.
NEWS
By Richard Eder and Richard Eder,Los Angeles Times | September 10, 1995
"The First Man," by Albert Camus, translated from the French by David Hapgood. New York: Alfred A. Knopf. 336 pages. $23.Albert Camus, the French writer and Nobel Prize winner, died in 1960 when he crashed his car. In the wrecked car was the incomplete first part of what, clearly, was a much larger project, an autobiographical novel. His son and daughter have now edited and published that manuscript.To read it is to visit a tomb and find that a spring is bubbling from it. One of the themes is a search for the father who was killed in World War I a few months after Camus was born; another is a rending, brilliant evocation of the long-submerged claims that Algeria's harsh landscape and history exert on him. A third is a joyfully vivid re-creation of a childhood in the teeming port of Algiers in the 1930s, a childhood constrained by poverty but wonderfully free in exploration and sensuous discovery.
FEATURES
By Michael Kenney and Michael Kenney,Boston Globe | August 28, 1994
The winter of 1946-47 was a bitter one in Europe. Three years after liberation, Paris was still the "two cities" decried by the influential communist press -- "the Paris of nauseating luxury . . . and the other Paris."Paris had rapidly regained its prewar status as the capital of culture and style. In February, while "the other Paris" was shivering in its unheated apartments -- coal barges had been icebound on frozen rivers -- Christian Dior introduced his "New Look," fashions extravagant in their use of fabrics.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 26, 1994
PARIS -- Inside a mud-stained briefcase found near the site of the car crash that killed Albert Camus on Jan. 4, 1960, were 144 pages of almost indecipherable handwriting that made up the first draft of the early chapters of a novel based closely on his life.His widow, Francine, decided against publication. Camus had won the Nobel Prize in literature in 1957, but at the time of his death at the age of 46 he was on poor terms with Jean-Paul Sartre and other Left Bank luminaries, and she feared publication of the rough text would expose him to more attacks.
NEWS
August 10, 2000
An interview with Nancy Joy, a founding member of the Monday Night Book Club. What book are members reading this month? We're reading "The Plague" by Albert Camus. Which books have members liked? Well, we like all our books. We read a variety. We read nonfiction, current fiction and classics. We just read "Isaac's Storm" by Eric Larson. That's nonfiction. It's about the worst hurricane ever, in 1900. It killed between 6,000 and 10,000 people. We did a memoir this year, "All Over but the Shoutin'" by Rick Bragg.
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