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NEWS
July 30, 2011
In 1789 there was a great divide in the new American nation: Alexander Hamilton feared the tyranny of an uniformed majority, while Thomas Jefferson feared the tyranny of an elite minority. James Madison crafted the hybrid system that we have today as a compromise. Yet it was never anticipated that we would have today's tyranny of an uniformed minority. That tyranny is the roughly 20 percent (87 out of 435) of the elected officials in Washington who are being allowed to create this drama that threatens to bring the whole world to the brink of collapse, including those who call themselves Republicans.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | February 14, 2014
The Obama administration's latest delay in fully implementing the employer mandate in its embattled health-care insurance law confirms the harsh fact that it remains a huge political albatross hanging around the president's neck. The conceding of another year or more of time to employers to offer health-care coverage to their workers guarantees that the contentious issue will continue to plague Barack Obama as he struggles to free himself of the legislative near-paralysis that has gripped Washington throughout his Oval Office tenure.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | February 14, 2014
The Obama administration's latest delay in fully implementing the employer mandate in its embattled health-care insurance law confirms the harsh fact that it remains a huge political albatross hanging around the president's neck. The conceding of another year or more of time to employers to offer health-care coverage to their workers guarantees that the contentious issue will continue to plague Barack Obama as he struggles to free himself of the legislative near-paralysis that has gripped Washington throughout his Oval Office tenure.
NEWS
December 26, 2012
Letter writer Rosalind Ellis says that her union membership meant to her "job protection, seniority rights, benefits assured by contract and protection from arbitrary termination" ("A world without unions would be a terrible place," Dec. 19). She is absolutely correct. The only issue is that all of this is guaranteed regardless of job performance or even despite one's performance on the job. No matter what happens, it's nearly impossible to be fired. This is the reason that unions, which were important years ago, have become an albatross.
FEATURES
January 9, 2006
Philadelphia-founded An Albatross' tunes can be heavy cyber thrash or progressive electronic dance. Either way, the group's shows are fast and frenetic. The band plays the Ottobar, 2549 N. Howard St., tonight along with Jakuta and Carl, Yukon and New Age Hillbilly. The mu sic starts at 9 p.m. Tickets are $8. For more information, call 410- 662-0069 or visit theotto bar.com.
NEWS
By E. Vernon Laux and E. Vernon Laux,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 18, 2000
NEW YORK -- A wayward yellow-nosed albatross that apparently strayed from its marine habitat in the Southern Hemisphere has turned up in the New York metropolitan area, and has been spotted flying along the median strip of the Garden State Parkway. The albatross -- a seagoing species with wingspans up to 7 feet -- is usually found in the South Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, and is an extreme rarity in the North Atlantic. But recently, bird experts have been astonished by reports that an albatross has been seen visiting estuaries and shorelines in the Northeast and sitting on local beaches with sea gulls.
FEATURES
August 18, 1998
The Albatross ProjectThe legendary albatross, often seen swooping down on ocean liners and gliding over beaches, is now the subject of a fascinating Web study. The Albatross Project allows you to take flight with these big birds via satellite and join them in searches for food and fun. Take a flight of fancy to http://www.wfu.edu/ albatross. Once here, you can do science in real time, tracking the animals along the Pacific Ocean on maps. Meet your fellow kid scientists from around the world, who are making exciting discoveries of their own. The site has fascinating photos and descriptions too. If bird is the word, the Albatross Project is the coolest winged site on the Web.Make a Run for the BorderIf you think pyramids exist only in Egypt, then grab your boots and head south of the border.
NEWS
By KENNETH R. WEISS and KENNETH R. WEISS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 2, 2006
MIDWAY ATOLL -- The albatross chick jumped to its feet, eyes alert and focused. At 5 months, it stood 18 inches tall and was nearly fully feathered except for the downy fuzz that fringed its head. All attitude, the chick straightened up and clacked its beak to scare off a visitor, then rocked back on its legs and dangled webbed feet in the air to cool them in the afternoon breeze. It gave the impression of reclining in a lounge chair. The next afternoon, the chick ignored passers-by. Its wings drooped, too heavy to lift in the hot sun. Only a month from first flight, the bird flopped on its belly, its legs splayed awkwardly.
NEWS
December 26, 2012
Letter writer Rosalind Ellis says that her union membership meant to her "job protection, seniority rights, benefits assured by contract and protection from arbitrary termination" ("A world without unions would be a terrible place," Dec. 19). She is absolutely correct. The only issue is that all of this is guaranteed regardless of job performance or even despite one's performance on the job. No matter what happens, it's nearly impossible to be fired. This is the reason that unions, which were important years ago, have become an albatross.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Molly Knight | September 14, 2003
The Annotated Ancient Mariner, by Samuel Taylor Coleridge, with an introduction and notes by Martin Gardner (Prometheus, 210 pages, $29). Incoherent and unintelligible. That's what many critics said about Samuel Taylor Coleridge's "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner" when it was first published in 1798. Now hailed as one of the greatest -- and most mysterious -- narrative poems in the English language, Coleridge's masterpiece has been given new life by Martin Gardner, the prolific author and Scientific American columnist.
NEWS
July 30, 2011
In 1789 there was a great divide in the new American nation: Alexander Hamilton feared the tyranny of an uniformed majority, while Thomas Jefferson feared the tyranny of an elite minority. James Madison crafted the hybrid system that we have today as a compromise. Yet it was never anticipated that we would have today's tyranny of an uniformed minority. That tyranny is the roughly 20 percent (87 out of 435) of the elected officials in Washington who are being allowed to create this drama that threatens to bring the whole world to the brink of collapse, including those who call themselves Republicans.
NEWS
By KENNETH R. WEISS and KENNETH R. WEISS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 2, 2006
MIDWAY ATOLL -- The albatross chick jumped to its feet, eyes alert and focused. At 5 months, it stood 18 inches tall and was nearly fully feathered except for the downy fuzz that fringed its head. All attitude, the chick straightened up and clacked its beak to scare off a visitor, then rocked back on its legs and dangled webbed feet in the air to cool them in the afternoon breeze. It gave the impression of reclining in a lounge chair. The next afternoon, the chick ignored passers-by. Its wings drooped, too heavy to lift in the hot sun. Only a month from first flight, the bird flopped on its belly, its legs splayed awkwardly.
NEWS
June 29, 2006
Kenneth D. Schisler, the departing chairman of Maryland's Public Service Commission, has sued the state in an effort to keep his job. Politically speaking, this is about as good as it gets for Democrats. Not only do they appear to be on solid legal ground in their reshuffling of the PSC, but they can continue to trumpet their diminishment of the Baltimore Gas and Electric rate increase - and the commission's embarrassing performance - for at least several weeks more. So why does Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. claim to be happy the state is being taken to court?
FEATURES
January 9, 2006
Philadelphia-founded An Albatross' tunes can be heavy cyber thrash or progressive electronic dance. Either way, the group's shows are fast and frenetic. The band plays the Ottobar, 2549 N. Howard St., tonight along with Jakuta and Carl, Yukon and New Age Hillbilly. The mu sic starts at 9 p.m. Tickets are $8. For more information, call 410- 662-0069 or visit theotto bar.com.
NEWS
By Usha Lee McFarling and Usha Lee McFarling,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 15, 2005
Albatrosses can fly more than 25,000 miles in the 18 months between their breeding seasons, sometimes making nearly nonstop trips around the southern half of the globe, according to a new study. The large and graceful seabirds breed on islands north of Antarctica, but little was known previously about where they went during the off season. Researchers used long-lived electronic leg monitors to track 22 gray-headed albatrosses. They found that 12 of the birds circled the globe at a latitude just south of the southern tips of South America and Africa.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Molly Knight | September 14, 2003
The Annotated Ancient Mariner, by Samuel Taylor Coleridge, with an introduction and notes by Martin Gardner (Prometheus, 210 pages, $29). Incoherent and unintelligible. That's what many critics said about Samuel Taylor Coleridge's "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner" when it was first published in 1798. Now hailed as one of the greatest -- and most mysterious -- narrative poems in the English language, Coleridge's masterpiece has been given new life by Martin Gardner, the prolific author and Scientific American columnist.
NEWS
June 29, 2006
Kenneth D. Schisler, the departing chairman of Maryland's Public Service Commission, has sued the state in an effort to keep his job. Politically speaking, this is about as good as it gets for Democrats. Not only do they appear to be on solid legal ground in their reshuffling of the PSC, but they can continue to trumpet their diminishment of the Baltimore Gas and Electric rate increase - and the commission's embarrassing performance - for at least several weeks more. So why does Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. claim to be happy the state is being taken to court?
NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | August 10, 1993
LET me crawl out on a limb and forecast that for all the fanfare and editorial praise, the slaying of the deficit will not ignite a recovery. By raising taxes and cutting taxes, the deficit-reduction deal reduces purchasing power by $80 billion next year alone. This contraction will dwarf the tonic effect of lower interest rates.Earlier this year, the Federal Reserve Board did cut rates. But despite lower interest rates, the economy grew at less than 2 percent in the first half of 1993.Lately, the Fed's Open Market Committee has voted twice in a row-- in May and July -- against any further monetary easing.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2002
Anne Arundel County could be forced to pay the former owner of a Broadneck peninsula horse farm double the $500,000 she got for it in 1998 if a bill before state legislators becomes law. When Betsy Gleaves sold the 12-acre farm to the county, she thought she was setting up a lasting memorial to her late husband, Andy Smith, who was an avid horseman and riding instructor. She knew area residents didn't want the bucolic property covered with townhouses and extracted from the county what she thought was a guarantee that it would remain an equestrian center.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | March 29, 2001
Business leaders, lawyers, developers and politicians gathered in Woodlawn last night for an event billed as a celebration of C .A. Dutch Ruppersberger's 25 years of public service. But an unspoken question filled the cavernous function room at Martin's West: How many years does he have left? Ruppersberger, 54, cannot seek re-election as Baltimore County executive, and the only other office he has expressed interest in is governor. The estimated $350,000 raised at his largest annual fund-raiser last night, combined with $1.6 million available cash reported in November, would certainly aid a statewide campaign.
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