Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAlbanian
IN THE NEWS

Albanian

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,Special to the Sun | July 29, 2007
Chronicle in Stone Ismail Kadare Arcade Publishing / 320 pages / $25 "War," the old woman says as she points to red places on the rooster's breastbone. "War and blood." The words haunt the boy who narrates Ismail Kadare's autobiographical novel, Chronicle in Stone. They also foreshadow the plot as well as establishing the tone and background of this gem-like growing-up tale, which was first published in Albania in 1971 and first translated into English in 1987. This new English translation by David Bellos is based on Kadare's revisions to the original, which were written after he received the first Man Booker International Prize in 2005 for the body of his work.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,Special to the Sun | July 29, 2007
Chronicle in Stone Ismail Kadare Arcade Publishing / 320 pages / $25 "War," the old woman says as she points to red places on the rooster's breastbone. "War and blood." The words haunt the boy who narrates Ismail Kadare's autobiographical novel, Chronicle in Stone. They also foreshadow the plot as well as establishing the tone and background of this gem-like growing-up tale, which was first published in Albania in 1971 and first translated into English in 1987. This new English translation by David Bellos is based on Kadare's revisions to the original, which were written after he received the first Man Booker International Prize in 2005 for the body of his work.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Contributing Writer | November 12, 1992
PRISTINA, Kosovo -- The feared Chetnik symbol fluttered on a Serbian flag. Beside it flew the royal Serbian double-headed eagle and a large photograph of "Duke" Vojislav Seselj, the BTC mastermind of ethnic cleansing. Surrounded by these symbols of Serbian power, Milorad Jevric of the Serb Radical Party detailed the plans for what could be the next Bosnia.Its name is Kosovo. Its population is mostly Albanian. But the Serbs want it. Diplomats say it may not be a question of whether but when Serbian guns will be trained on it.The 90 percent Albanian population would be bombarded from outside Kosovo, "only, of course, if they attack us," said Mr. Jevric.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2003
He recently won a precedent-setting war-crimes conviction. But as former Carroll County State's Attorney Thomas E. Hickman begins his third year as a United Nations prosecutor in Kosovo, he finds as much meaning - and a reason to hope for better times in the dangerous Balkans - in a case involving a single homicide. A Serb woman had been beaten to death at the door of her bustling apartment building, but his investigation stalled when no one would acknowledge having seen anything. Then about a year later, an ethnic Albanian woman named the killer: an Albanian man who hated Serbs and wanted the victim's apartment.
NEWS
March 10, 1998
REPRESSION breeds violence. Kosovo is a textbook example.The revocation of that largely ethnic-Albanian province's autonomy by Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic in 1989 triggered demands for independence. Since then, the spiral of violence has accelerated. In the past few months, secessionist guerrillas have been attacking police stations and assassinating Serb officials. That led to last week's bloody four-day sweep by Serbian police, which devastated villages and caused untold human suffering, including dozens of deaths.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Staff Writer | June 1, 1993
PRISTINA, Yugoslavia -- The Albanian man walking by the downtown mosque was carrying a box. That was provocation enough for Dusko, the Serbian military policeman.So, as a small crowd of frowning Albanians gathered to watch, Dusko searched the man. The policeman, who wouldn't give his own last name, asked for identification papers. He called in the man's name on a walkie-talkie.No luck. The guy was clean. But Dusko remained skeptical."They are all suspect, from age 7 to 77," he said of the Albanians, who make up 90 percent of the local population but none of its official leadership.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 16, 1998
PRISTINA, Yugoslavia -- With the outside world doing little to stop them, heavily armed Serbian policemen backed by Yugoslav army soldiers are stepping up their terror against ethnic Albanian civilians in Kosovo, driving tens of thousands from their homes and shelling, looting and burning their villages.In at least one village in southern Kosovo, the police are demolishing brick homes that survived being set afire. In a village nearby, the police told residents that they must surrender any weapons they had or their homes would be burned to the ground, according to villagers and the local Roman Catholic priest.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 13, 2001
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia - NATO and Yugoslavia agreed yesterday to let Yugoslav troops return to a small section of a buffer area on Serbia's tense border with Kosovo and Macedonia, an important sign of confidence in the new democratic authorities in Belgrade, two years after NATO began bombing Yugoslavia to drive Serbian forces out of Kosovo. Yugoslav soldiers and Interior Ministry police, operating under negotiated rules and without helicopters, tanks or armored personnel carriers, will enter a 9-square-mile section of the zone "in the next few days," announced Lt. Gen. Carlo Cabigiosu, commander of the NATO-led peacekeeping troops in Kosovo.
NEWS
March 22, 2001
THE WEAKEST OF the successor states to the former Yugoslavia, Macedonia has in its decade of existence avoided the bloody traumas of the others. Until now. NATO peace-keepers in Kosovo need to police the border better to prevent arms from reaching the ethnic Albanian insurgents in Macedonia. The United States should make clear it is not leaving the area before peace prevails. Intervention in Macedonia itself, though called for by Russian President Vladimir V. Putin, is not an issue. Macedonia has not sought it. The fighting is brought by two small groups that have only recently appeared inside the country; one is an extension of the guerrilla Kosovo Liberation Army.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 10, 1999
PODUJEVO, Yugoslavia -- Inside a snow-covered farmhouse set deep in Kosovo's countryside, the rebel commander known as Remi watches television, waits for orders and prepares for the springtime killing season.Negotiations have begun in France to end Kosovo's conflict, but Remi and the Kosovo Liberation Army are steeling themselves for the thaw. They follow the talks and are hopeful they will succeed, on their terms. In case they don't, the ethnic Albanians care for their weapons, holding fast to their aim of Kosovo's independence from Serbia.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2003
He recently won a precedent-setting war-crimes conviction. But as former Carroll County State's Attorney Thomas E. Hickman begins his third year as a United Nations prosecutor in Kosovo, he finds as much meaning - and a reason to hope for better times in the dangerous Balkans - in a case involving a single homicide. A Serb woman had been beaten to death at the door of her bustling apartment building, but his investigation stalled when no one would acknowledge having seen anything. Then about a year later, an ethnic Albanian woman named the killer: an Albanian man who hated Serbs and wanted the victim's apartment.
NEWS
By Richard Mertens and Richard Mertens,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 31, 2002
KRUSHE E VOGEL, Kosovo --- For three years, Shemsije Batusha, 32, clung to the hope that her husband would come back. She cleaned, cooked meals, chopped wood, looked after her son, Mevlan, and tended to her 77-year-old mother-in-law. She earned money when she could. But all the while she told herself that her hardships would end when her missing husband, Milain, returned and took his place in the family again. All over Krushe e Vogel, a small, hillside farming village in southern Kosovo, women tried to lighten their grief with the hope that their absent husbands and sons would return.
NEWS
By Tom Hundley and Tom Hundley,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 3, 2002
THE HAGUE - Victim by victim, the prosecution in Slobodan Milosevic's war crimes trial is demonstrating that within hours of the start of NATO's 1999 bombing campaign the Yugoslav government began executing a comprehensive and systematic plan to expel hundreds of thousands of ethnic Albanians from Kosovo. Milosevic, acting as his own lawyer, is arguing that the 800,000 Albanians who fled their homes after the bombing began March 24, 1999, did so because they were afraid of NATO bombs, not because they were terrorized by Serbian police and paramilitaries.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 27, 2002
THE HAGUE, Netherlands - Prosecutors in the United Nations war crimes tribunal sought yesterday to clamp down on Slobodan Milosevic's lengthy cross-examinations, saying his grillings could deter witnesses from testifying against him. "We do have to have in mind the effect that questioning can have on witnesses yet to come," the lead prosecutor, Geoffrey Nice, told judges. "It would be foolish to pretend that this process isn't being given very wide publicity." His comments came at the end of a day when Milosevic, at times sharply, questioned two ethnic Albanians who said they witnessed executions by Serb forces during the war in Kosovo in 1999.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 18, 2001
PRISTINA, Kosovo - At a polling place inside a heavily guarded Serbian housing project, a woman was shouting angrily at international observers of yesterday's election in Kosovo, a first step toward democracy after a decade of violence. She wanted a Serbian flag to fly outside. "We are Serbs and should at least have our flag with us," said the woman, Darinka Bjeletic, one of only a few hundred Serbs in Pristina, down from 20,000 before the war. Serbs and Albanians turned out in large numbers yesterday to elect a 120-seat provincial assembly that will, in turn, choose a president.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 21, 2001
MACEDONIA-KOSOVO BORDER -- At dusk, leaf and branch fade to gray high in the rugged mountains on the border between Macedonia and Kosovo. Invisible in the bushes, three U.S. soldiers in camouflage crouch, their weapons cocked; a hundred feet away, three more soldiers take the same position. The six surround a narrow clearing that looks like any other opening in the Kosovo woods. It is anything but. The trail, one of many, leads straight over the border south into Macedonia. For months, it has been a key arms smuggling route for ethnic Albanian rebels, who call themselves the National Liberation Army.
NEWS
By Gjeraqina Tuhina and Gjeraqina Tuhina,GLOBAL BEAT SYNDICATE | April 6, 1999
(The following first-person account of the scene in Pristina, the capital of Kosovo, since the latest wave of ethnic cleansing began there was written by a young Kosovo Albanian woman who has been working there as a free-lance journalist.)SKOPJE, Macedonia -- Even after 10 days of NATO air attacks, I didn't think it would happen. Even after the trains began running to Macedonia (the line to Skopje hadn't run for ages), I didn't think it would come to this.But suddenly, after Dragodan, an Albanian district of Pristina, was cleared, it started.
NEWS
By Justin Brown and Justin Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 21, 1998
PRISTINA, Yugoslavia -- Ratko Djukic, a Serb, wears dark sunglasses and glances nervously over his shoulder as he loads his family's belongings into a canvas-covered moving truck.He may have heard the curses muttered by a friend passing on the street. "I'm not fleeing," he insists. "This is only temporary."Like many Serbs, Djukic sees little future for him in Kosovo, the ethnic Albanian-dominated southern province of Serbia. The economy is bad, the ethnic Albanians are growing in number, and an all-out war seems inevitable.
NEWS
August 18, 2001
EUROPE HAS a big stake in the peace accord signed Monday in Macedonia. Continued conflict between that fragile little country's government and guerrillas of the ethnic Albanian minority threatens the peace of the continent. One possible scenario predicted the country's breakup followed by a scramble for its territory by neighboring countries colliding with one another. Another foresaw a cultural war pitting the Islamic world supporting the Albanians against Orthodox Christendom backing the Macedonians.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.