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NEWS
March 29, 1992
The new political leader of Albania, Sali Berishah, is a physician, a heart specialist. But since, like everything else in the country, the hospitals don't work, he might as well try to cure Albania before getting back to his other patients.One year ago, as the world's most isolated Stalinist dictatorship crumbled, the voters went to the polls and re-elected the Communists, renamed Socialists, to power. The voters didn't really believe that anyone else would be permitted to rule. Mentally, they were still living under Enver Hoxha's communism.
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NEWS
By James Oliphant and James Oliphant,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 10, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court declined yesterday to allow a lawsuit to go forward that questions the government's use of rendition, the practice of capturing suspected terrorists and sending them to other countries for a more intense form of interrogation than is permitted under U.S. law. In doing so, the court implicitly endorsed the Bush administration's use of a sweeping legal defense that prevents claims of abuse and torture at the hands of U.S...
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NEWS
June 16, 1991
It is premature to call Albania post-Communist. But Albania has chosen that road, with no going back. It is where Hungary was two years ago. Conflict may be inevitable among the old Communists who thrived under the 41-year tyranny of Enver Hoxha, the Communist reformers who seek to save the apparatus by humanizing it, and the outright anti-Communists. But Albania's place in Europe under the Adriatic sun is now assured.The election March 31, before the opposition was formedproduced an illusory Communist victory.
NEWS
By Mark Silva and Mark Silva,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 11, 2007
TIRANA, Albania -- President Bush, making a historic and welcome appearance yesterday in this former communist nation where no previous sitting American president has set foot, pledged full commitment to promoting Albania's admission to NATO. But Bush appeared less certain about his stated commitment to the independence of neighboring Kosovo, with the president insisting that he will push for international agreement on the autonomous province's freedom from Serbia - yet questioning whether he had actually called for a deadline.
NEWS
January 31, 1992
To convince itself and the world that it is no longer Communist but "normal," the Albanian state is holding a Miss Albania contest. Which is not how they do it at Atlantic City.Albanian young women are no doubt the equal of the world's best. But for cosmetics, they must go to the black market. And for the loan of dresses, to the state television costume shop. And for practice walking, there are only three mirrors available.This is not a great tradition. The Albanian soul that was suppressed under communism and may now re-emerge is Muslim.
NEWS
April 6, 1991
Albania's first free election since the 1920s neither threw the Communists out nor legitimized them. Rather, it split the country. The result will be somewhat like Romania and Bulgaria, with regimes that are basically Communist trying to persuade the people that they are not, without knowing how.The Communist dictator Ramiz Alia lost for parliament in his own district in Tirana, despite marching soldiers in to vote for him there. Mr. Alia is likely to remain president of the country and head of the Party of Labor, as the Communist Party prefers to be known.
NEWS
March 14, 1991
When one remembers that Mussolini's forces invaded and occupied little Albania in April 1939, thus condemning it to half a century of isolation that is coming to its end with the restoration of relations with the United States Friday, the conduct of Italian authorities toward Albanian refugees is an outrage.Some 20,000 would-be emigres, who commandeered Albanian merchant ships a fortnight ago and sailed the 75 miles to Brindisi, were left to shiver on the docks, go hungry and live amid deplorable sanitary conditions.
NEWS
By Dusko Doder | March 25, 1997
WASHINGTON -- In early 1991 Sali Berisha -- then in his proud prime as one of Albania's new opposition politicians -- was full of hope.Charming at first blush, the cardiologist-turned-dissident had the reassuring manners of an experienced physician. We just have to get rid of communist lawlessness, he told me as we walked in Tirana's Skanderbeg Square that sunny winter day, and Albania would join democratic Europe.Mr. Berisha and economist Gramos Pashko had just founded the first opposition Democratic Party vowing to end Albania's bleak isolation.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Sun Staff Writer | April 26, 1995
The souvenirs of Bethany Schultz's trip include callouses on her palms and a soft spot in her heart for a girl named Jetmira.Nine-year-old Jetmira (the J is pronounced like a Y) is one of the children at the orphanage in Tirana, Albania, where Bethany and a few dozen American youths spent 11 days earlier this month building a playground and a bike path."I'm going to start writing to her," said the 14-year-old Greenmount girl, who is undaunted by the language difference. Bethany has an Albanian dictionary, and she'll just guess at the conjugation of verbs, using what she knows from her Spanish class.
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | June 25, 1993
Tirana, AlbaniaIN A country of people gnarled by their tortured history, Sali Berisha is tall, broad-shouldered and handsome. In a land doomed for 500 years to live under one bizarre dictator after another, he is one of the Balkans' few genuine democrats.In a country doomed for nearly 40 years to live under the rabidly isolationist regime of brutal Stalinist Enver Hoxha -- whose philosophy consisted of brute force and an Albania closed off from the world -- this first democratic president of Albania is sometimes called the "Vaclav Havel of the Balkans."
NEWS
April 15, 2007
The International Committee of the Red Cross warns that conditions for ordinary Iraqis are bad, and getting worse. Pierre Kraehenbuehl, director of operations for the ICRC, says there is no evidence that the security crackdown in Baghdad has done anything to improve security or living conditions for its residents. In just the year following the February 2006 bombing of the Golden Dome mosque in Samarra, which may have been the definitive moment in the turn toward sectarian warfare, 106,000 families have been displaced from their homes, notes a Red Cross report released last week.
NEWS
By John Crewdson and Tom Hundley and John Crewdson and Tom Hundley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 3, 2005
MILAN, Italy - Among the multiple mysteries swirling around the abduction of Osama Moustafa Hassan Nasr in Italy, one stands out as by far the most perplexing. Why would the U.S. government go to elaborate lengths to seize a 39-year-old Egyptian who, according to former Albanian intelligence officials, was once the CIA's most productive source of information within the tightly knit group of Islamic fundamentalists living in exile in Albania? Neither the Bush administration nor the CIA has acknowledged any role in the operation.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara | September 7, 2004
HAVING FINALLY seen Michael Moore's Fahrenheit 9/11, with its suggestion of a sinister relationship between the royals of Saudi Arabia and the family that gave this nation its current president, I thought of my late brother, Edward. As a young man, he went to live in the desert kingdom, married there, raised two children, then 23 years later came home and gave me the impression he never thoroughly understood the country where he had spent a third of his lifetime. This was not his fault.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | June 15, 2003
EVERY NOW AND THEN, you stumble across a story that is so wonderful you say to yourself: "If this story were made into a movie, Roger Ebert would deliberately expose himself to mutating radiation so he could grow additional thumbs and point them up." Today I want to tell you such a story. It was brought to my attention by alert reader C. Erik Enockson, and it has what Aristotle called the Four Essential Elements of Drama: (1) despair, (2) intrigue, (3) Canadians and (4) snorkeling. When you read this story, you're going to think I made it up. But I ask you: Have I ever lied to you?
BUSINESS
December 20, 2002
In The Region Bethlehem chief, PBGC discuss pension takeover The head of Bethlehem Steel Corp. met with officials at Pension Benefit Guaranty Corp. in Washington yesterday to discuss the government agency's termination Wednesday of the bankrupt steelmaker's pension plan. Bette Kovach, a Bethlehem spokeswoman, said the company and the federal pension agency are working out the transition from a Bethlehem-administered plan to one that would be administered by the government. The takeover of the pension, which is $4.3 billion under- funded, is subject to court approval.
NEWS
October 28, 2002
Geraldine of Albania, 87, who as the wife of King Zog was for one year her adopted country's first and only queen and the only member of European royalty with American blood, died Tuesday in Tirana, Albania's capital. Though she was a countess -- her father was the Hungarian nobleman Count Gyula Apponyi de Nagy-Appony, and her mother the former Gladys Virginia Stewart, a member of an old Virginia family -- her family's fortunes had plunged so far that at age 20 she was selling postcards in the Budapest National Museum.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 16, 1998
TIRANA, Albania -- With the U.S. Embassy in Albania shut down for fear of a terrorist attack and its dependents and nonessential personnel sent home, a company of Marines flew in yesterday to stand guard over those remaining."
NEWS
By Eric Bourne and Eric Bourne,Christian Science Monitor | March 29, 1991
VIENNA, Austria -- To predict a year ago that Albania would be voting Sunday in a virtually free, multiparty election would have seemed over-optimistic.True, the attitudes of four rigidly Stalinist decades were thawing. But the situation was far from the democratization occurring elsewhere in Eastern Europe.Officials had begun to talk of adjusting to contemporary European economic thinking and to admit that it would mean political change, too.Nonetheless, it was startling to hear Fatos Nano, a young, previously unknown economics lecturer, tell me (in summer 1989)
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | June 26, 2001
Ex-Peru spy chief is flown home for corruption trial LIMA, Peru - Looking calm and even smiling briefly, Peru's former spy chief Vladimiro Montesinos, Latin America's most wanted man, was flown home yesterday to face trial for corruption, embezzlement and murder. Ex-President Alberto K. Fujimori's 56-year-old former right-hand man was given a medical check and was expected to be taken temporarily to a cell beneath Peru's main law courts for questioning. Peruvians were elated by the surprise capture, after eight months on the run, of the once untouchable man dubbed "Rasputin" for the power he wielded behind Fujimori's throne for a decade.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2001
He leaves for Albania today, and after visiting old friends, he will move on to war-torn Macedonia, where he is a consultant teaching practical civics. Then, it's Turkey for an international conference sponsored by the Johns Hopkins University, and finally Puerto Rico for more teaching. It's a schedule that might fatigue a twenty-something, but at 70, former Howard County Executive J. Hugh Nichols can't wait to get started. Despite years of work, and setbacks punctuated by armed ethnic conflicts in Eastern European nations struggling to modernize, Nichols has no thought of retirement.
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