Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAlaska
IN THE NEWS

Alaska

SPORTS
January 6, 1992
ANCHORAGE, Alaska -- Teresa Jones scored 50 points to lead Longview of Texas, ranked 20th by USA Today, to a 66-57 victory over Western in the fifth-place game of the Great One girls basketball tournament late Saturday night.Freshman Chanel Wright scored 22 to lead the Doves, ranked second locally.Western (8-3) held a 19-16 lead after one quarter and was within 34-33 at halftime, but Longview (17-1) outscored the Doves 15-6 in the third quarter.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 3, 2001
do you KNOW? How fast can an eagle fly? Answer: Some migrating eagles can catch columns of rising air and reach speeds of 30 miles per hour! learn MORE! Visit the bald eagle at the Baltimore Zoo! Read The Bald Eagle, Endangered No More by Mac and Jennifer Priebe. 1. There are now an estimated 500,000 bald eagles in the United States. 2. 80 percent of all bald eagles are found in Alaska. 3. The bald eagle was recently removed from the endangered species list.
NEWS
March 23, 2003
IN A KEY test of sentiment, the Senate mustered a narrow bipartisan majority last week in favor of protecting Alaska's wildlife refuge from oil drilling. It was likely not the end of the decades-long battle, but it was a crushing defeat for drilling supporters who might have expected better from a Republican Congress. This should be a moment of maximum opportunity for the Alaska officials, energy companies and labor leaders who have been aching to tap into the black gold they believe lies under the frozen tundra.
SPORTS
January 6, 1992
ANCHORAGE, Alaska -- Teresa Jones scored 50 points to lead Longview of Texas, ranked 20th by USA Today, to a 66-57 victory over Western in the fifth-place game of the Great One girls basketball tournament late Saturday night.Freshman Chanel Wright scored 22 to lead the Doves, ranked second locally.Western (8-3) held a 19-16 lead after one quarter and was within 34-33 at halftime, but Longview (17-1) outscored the Doves by 15-6 in the third quarter.
FEATURES
March 16, 1999
Be a 4Kids DetectiveWhen you know the answers to these questions, go to http://www.4Kids.org/detectives/What type of animal is a black-legged kittiwake?How many pounds of corn silage can a dairy cow consume daily? (Go to http://www.agr.state.nc.us/cyber/kidswrld/general/ barnyard/barnyard.htm to find out.)According to Penny, how did people buy things before money?THIS SITE MAKES GOOD CENTSEver wonder what your parents are doing when they send that tube flying at the bank drive-thru? There's more to banking than just getting money.
NEWS
June 2, 2002
YES, OK, hurray for President Bush. He decided last week to spend $235 million to buy back oil and gas leases and thereby protect the beaches of Florida's Panhandle and 765,000 acres of the Everglades. It's the right thing to do, and it's popular, as well. Here's what's hard to figure out, though. The White House has pushed and pushed to allow oil companies to begin drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska, though so far without success because of opposition in the Senate.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | March 9, 2005
"It's been two months since the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore temporarily shut down and Magnet, the 925-pound polar bear, is getting lonely." The Sun, Feb. 27. "Zoo officials are hoping that Magnet will mate with Alaska this year." The Sun, March 3. Why not broadcast it on CNN? Yes, I am a lonely, 925-pound polar bear and thanks for mentioning the weight thing, too. I was 920 pounds before the holidays and what, you didn't gain 5 pounds over Christmas? So, my keepers are "hoping that Magnet will mate with Alaska this year."
NEWS
By SAM HOWE VERHOVEK and SAM HOWE VERHOVEK,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 13, 2006
DEADHORSE, Alaska -- Hard by the Beaufort Sea, in 30-degree windchill and surrounded by an otherworldly tableau of bright orange natural gas flares, caribou herds and wisps of arctic fog, Kemp Copeland wants everyone to know that he's working as fast as he can. As field operations manager at BP Exploration Alaska's vast oil complex here, 250 miles north of the Arctic Circle on the northern edge of Alaska, the 45-year-old Texas native oversees repairs to...
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | November 30, 1994
Piney Ridge Elementary students who want to get the lay of the land need go no farther than the school playground.Several fourth- and fifth-grade students spent most of the daylight hours yesterday painting a colorful map of the 50 states on the blacktop where they play ball and jump rope.Spots of green paint trailed out from an isolated picture of Alaska."They can be little islands around the state," said Dylan Schwacke, 9. "Alaska has lots of islands."As he surveyed the distance between Alaska and Washington state, Chris Bennett, 10, said, "I never knew Canada was this big."
FEATURES
By Stu Bykofsky and Stu Bykofsky,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 7, 1993
ARCTIC CIRCLE, Alaska -- It was the best of times, it was the worst of times. The mosquitoes were ferocious, the sun beamed at midnight.This is a tale of two American cities -- Kotzebue and Nome.You have heard of Nome, of course, 200 miles below the Arctic Circle. It is ingrained in the American consciousness, perhaps in grade-school, as the country's rooting-tooting city of the north.So you might be surprised, as I was, to learn that Nome's population is only 4,500 and that the city, just a thumbnail on the shore of the Bering Sea, is less than 100 years old, born as the result of a mammoth gold strike in 1898.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.