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NEWS
March 23, 2003
IN A KEY test of sentiment, the Senate mustered a narrow bipartisan majority last week in favor of protecting Alaska's wildlife refuge from oil drilling. It was likely not the end of the decades-long battle, but it was a crushing defeat for drilling supporters who might have expected better from a Republican Congress. This should be a moment of maximum opportunity for the Alaska officials, energy companies and labor leaders who have been aching to tap into the black gold they believe lies under the frozen tundra.
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SPORTS
January 6, 1992
ANCHORAGE, Alaska -- Teresa Jones scored 50 points to lead Longview of Texas, ranked 20th by USA Today, to a 66-57 victory over Western in the fifth-place game of the Great One girls basketball tournament late Saturday night.Freshman Chanel Wright scored 22 to lead the Doves, ranked second locally.Western (8-3) held a 19-16 lead after one quarter and was within 34-33 at halftime, but Longview (17-1) outscored the Doves by 15-6 in the third quarter.
FEATURES
March 16, 1999
Be a 4Kids DetectiveWhen you know the answers to these questions, go to http://www.4Kids.org/detectives/What type of animal is a black-legged kittiwake?How many pounds of corn silage can a dairy cow consume daily? (Go to http://www.agr.state.nc.us/cyber/kidswrld/general/ barnyard/barnyard.htm to find out.)According to Penny, how did people buy things before money?THIS SITE MAKES GOOD CENTSEver wonder what your parents are doing when they send that tube flying at the bank drive-thru? There's more to banking than just getting money.
NEWS
By SAM HOWE VERHOVEK and SAM HOWE VERHOVEK,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 13, 2006
DEADHORSE, Alaska -- Hard by the Beaufort Sea, in 30-degree windchill and surrounded by an otherworldly tableau of bright orange natural gas flares, caribou herds and wisps of arctic fog, Kemp Copeland wants everyone to know that he's working as fast as he can. As field operations manager at BP Exploration Alaska's vast oil complex here, 250 miles north of the Arctic Circle on the northern edge of Alaska, the 45-year-old Texas native oversees repairs to...
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | March 9, 2005
"It's been two months since the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore temporarily shut down and Magnet, the 925-pound polar bear, is getting lonely." The Sun, Feb. 27. "Zoo officials are hoping that Magnet will mate with Alaska this year." The Sun, March 3. Why not broadcast it on CNN? Yes, I am a lonely, 925-pound polar bear and thanks for mentioning the weight thing, too. I was 920 pounds before the holidays and what, you didn't gain 5 pounds over Christmas? So, my keepers are "hoping that Magnet will mate with Alaska this year."
NEWS
June 2, 2002
YES, OK, hurray for President Bush. He decided last week to spend $235 million to buy back oil and gas leases and thereby protect the beaches of Florida's Panhandle and 765,000 acres of the Everglades. It's the right thing to do, and it's popular, as well. Here's what's hard to figure out, though. The White House has pushed and pushed to allow oil companies to begin drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska, though so far without success because of opposition in the Senate.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | November 30, 1994
Piney Ridge Elementary students who want to get the lay of the land need go no farther than the school playground.Several fourth- and fifth-grade students spent most of the daylight hours yesterday painting a colorful map of the 50 states on the blacktop where they play ball and jump rope.Spots of green paint trailed out from an isolated picture of Alaska."They can be little islands around the state," said Dylan Schwacke, 9. "Alaska has lots of islands."As he surveyed the distance between Alaska and Washington state, Chris Bennett, 10, said, "I never knew Canada was this big."
NEWS
By John Balzar and John Balzar,Los Angeles Times | January 1, 1994
FAIRBANKS, Alaska -- From satellite images received here, from remote cameras on the seashore and from the periodic reports of bush pilots, scientists are following what for them is the event of a lifetime -- a rampaging glacier as big as the state of Delaware.Just a year ago, there was a flurry of news accounts about the retreat of the Bering Glacier, the largest in Alaska and probably the largest temperate glacier in the world. It was melting faster than ice was advancing, and scientists said the process might have gone on so long that it was irreversible.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 28, 2001
SITKA, ALASKA - The waters off the coast of the old Russian capital suddenly explode with activity, both man-made and wild. Fifty-one boats carrying many of the Northwest's star fishermen maneuver the crowded waterway on this rainy afternoon, jockeying, shoving and bluffing their way into position during the countdown to the 15-minute fishing frenzy. Tenders, skiffs and other vessels carrying net operators, processors, Japanese technicians and Coast Guard and state enforcement officials stand by. "Spotter" planes buzz overhead, directing boat captains by radio to giant schools of herring.
NEWS
By FROM SUN NEWS SERVICES | November 13, 2008
Obama names transition teams for 3 agencies WASHINGTON: President-elect Barack Obama has named a team heavy on experience in the Clinton administration to help guide transition efforts in the State, Defense and Treasury departments. In a statement yesterday, Obama revealed the agency review team leaders who will be responsible for reviewing budgets, personnel and policy in the three departments. All six served in some capacity under President Bill Clinton. The Treasury team leads are Josh Gotbaum, an investment fund adviser who has experience in multiple federal agencies; and Michael Warren, chief operating officer of advisory firm Stonebridge International who was executive director of the President's National Economic Council.
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