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NEWS
August 3, 2005
Jay Hammond, 83, a bush pilot and hunting guide who served two terms as Alaska's governor and helped create the oil-royalty fund that dispenses annual dividend checks to nearly everyone in the state, died yesterday at his home in Lake Clark. A Republican who was both a conservative and conservationist, Mr. Hammond was governor from 1975 to 1982, the period when oil began flowing through the Alaska pipeline. During his time in office, Alaska's broad-based tourism industry was born, fishery stocks were revived and the Alaska Permanent Fund was created.
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NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,sun reporter | December 6, 2006
The Maryland Zoo in Baltimore's female polar bear delivered a stillborn cub over the weekend - a disappointment, but an event that raises hope for a successful birth in the future, zoo officials announced yesterday. Alaska's handlers first glimpsed the tiny female cub about 2:30 p.m. Sunday, while watching a computer screen linked to a pair of infrared surveillance cameras monitoring her in the birthing den at the zoo. For the past four months, Alaska had been tucked away in the den in anticipation of a birth.
BUSINESS
By McClatchy News Service | November 11, 1991
ANCHORAGE, Alaska -- Trappers in Alaska got news last week that many of them had been dreading: The European Community has approved a long-threatened ban on pelts and fur products that come from countries allowing steel leg-hold traps.Such traps are commonly used across Alaska, Canada and the lower 48 states, and many of the fur sold by trappers in Alaska eventually wind up in the European market.The ban, which takes effect Jan. 1, 1995, essentially gives the rest of the world until then to develop more humane ways of trapping and killing fur-bearing animals.
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | August 26, 2007
WAINWRIGHT, Alaska -- The Arctic sea ice in northwestern Alaska is usually within 30 miles of Wainwright in August. Today it's more than 300 miles away, much farther than it has ever been. Wainwright hunters have usually bagged more than 100 walruses by this time in the season. They've bagged fewer than 20 this year. The ice left Wainwright so quickly in June -- a month earlier than usual -- that Oliver Peetook didn't have the chance to get a walrus. Like most Wainwright families, the Peetooks -- Oliver has four children -- usually fill the freezer with three or four of them, butchering the animals on the ice where they've been shot.
NEWS
November 27, 2009
Pfc. Christopher Pfeiffer, 20, a Westminster soldier accused of deserting his Army unit, is slowly making his way home after paperwork problems threatened to strand him in Kuwait a second time. Pfeiffer's superiors notified him last week that he might be discharged from the Army. They said he failed to return to his unit after coming home over the summer on authorized leave to take care of his sick wife and newborn daughter. Pfeiffer's family said he did everything he could to contact his chain of command and either further extend his leave or make travel arrangements back to Afghanistan.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,Sun reporter | November 6, 2006
It's sort of like the guessing game that plays out weekly in the celebrity tabloids. Have they just gained a few pounds, or is Britney, Gwyneth or J.Lo sporting a baby bump? But in this case, the possible mom-to-be doesn't have the trim waist of most starlets or much of a Hollywood following. She's close to 700 pounds and has a thick coat of honey-kissed white hair. And her fans are mostly limited to Charm City. Alaska, the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore's only female polar bear, might deliver a pair of cubs in December or January, hopeful zoo officials say. Or she might not. There's no pregnancy test for polar bears.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 1, 2003
ANCHORAGE, Alaska - When daylight lasts only a few hours, and the temperature digs in below zero, and the once-adorable kids become creatures to be feared, what are Alaskans to do? Well, they can go to Hawaii for a few thousand dollars. Or they can go to a new 40,500-square- foot oasis in South Anchorage, where the temperature is always 86 degrees, and palm trees preside over a lazy river, a wave pool, a pirate ship with seven slides, two big hot tubs and a 505-foot water-coaster ride called a Master Blaster.
NEWS
November 25, 2005
Alaska's Ted Stevens and Don Young don't pressure easily. The perennially gruff Mr. Stevens chairs the powerful Senate Appropriations committee, which writes the details of the federal budget. He wears a Tasmanian devil tie on days when final deals are being hammered out, and remembers when colleagues cross him. Representative Young, a bearded, grizzly bear of a man, leads the House committee that shapes long-term plans for federal transportation spending. He, too, deals with his colleagues in a my-way-or-no-highway manner.
NEWS
March 13, 2003
Rose Bezilla, a homemaker and former candy store clerk, died of cancer Saturday at Mercy Medical Center. She was 77. Born and raised in Brooklyn, N.Y., Rose Lewandowski worked during World War II as a telephone switchboard operator after her graduation from high school. She married John Bezilla in 1946, and the couple lived in California and Maine before settling on Fleet Street in Baltimore's Fells Point in the early 1960s. Her husband, a postal worker, died in 1994. After raising 12 children, Mrs. Bezilla worked during the 1980s as a clerk for Sweet Craft, a Harborplace candy shop.
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