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BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | July 6, 1991
Alaska Airlines emerged as No. 1 in customer satisfaction while Hawaiian Airlines finished dead last among the 14 domestic carriers in the first survey of the airline industry conducted by Consumer Reports.The survey indicated a high correlation between the financial health of the airline and its ability to satisfy customers.Honolulu-based Hawaiian, for instance, lost $121 million last year, while Alaska has earned a profit 18 consecutive years, including $15 million last year on operating revenues of $895.
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TRAVEL
By Stephanie Citron and For The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2014
A series of occasional articles exploring destinations that are easily reached via nonstop flights from Baltimore. Flying to the West Coast for vacation isn't often ideal for Baltimoreans. It can be difficult to find nonstop flights, and it's almost always a pricey venture. But that all changed this month when Alaska Airlines launched reasonably priced, nonstop service from BWI-Marshall to Seattle. Despite its rainy reputation, Seattle is an ideal destination during the months of September and October, when the summer crowds have dissipated and chances for sunshine remain high.
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NEWS
By Eric Malnic and Li Fellers and Eric Malnic and Li Fellers,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 4, 2003
Alaska Airlines and the Boeing Co. will not contest their liability in the crash three years ago of Flight 261 off the Southern California coast under an agreement approved yesterday, clearing the way for the resolution of outstanding claims and protecting the companies from further scrutiny by the families of victims. Legal experts say most remaining claims probably will be settled out of court, but a few could go to trial, focusing on the misery of the 83 passengers and five crew members during the more than 10 minutes it took the disabled jet to tumble into the Pacific Ocean.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
Alaska Airlines will begin offering daily flights between Baltimore and Seattle on Sept. 2 as part of a broader expansion of destination options from its West Coast hub, the airline announced Friday. The new route is the first Alaska Airlines will operate out of BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport. Officials at the airport have long been courting the airline. In the past several months, the airline has added five routes out of Seattle, where it is based, while shuttering several routes elsewhere - including in California and between Portland and other cities.
NEWS
By SEATTLE TIMES | December 25, 1999
SEATTLE -- As a businessman who flies almost every week, Bob Dindinger tries to avoid wasting time on the ground."I dislike spending time in airports," said Dindinger, president of Alaska Travel Adventures. "I'm usually the guy that gets there in the nick of time."At Alaska Airlines, the nick of time is good enough. The Seattle-based airline offers passengers an alternative to long waits and congested ticket counters: do-it-yourself check-ins.This year, Alaska became one of the first carriers in the world to allow customers to check their own bags and place them onto conveyor belts.
NEWS
By SEATTLE TIMES | April 24, 2000
SEATTLE -- Alaska Airlines is reviewing the maintenance records of most of its fleet after federal inspectors found two planes were prematurely returned to service. The airline agreed to the sweeping action after Federal Aviation Administration inspectors discovered that the two planes were released from maintenance work without required paperwork. The discovery came during a "white-glove inspection" of Alaska's maintenance operations in Seattle, Oakland and other cities. FAA spokesman Paul Turk said inspectors could not determine from the records whether certain work had been done on a Boeing 737 and an MD-80.
FEATURES
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 4, 1996
Alaska Airlines has become the first American carrier to offer direct bookings and payments with credit cards on the World Wide Web.The airline's home page on the Web, part of the Internet, is at http://www.alaska-air.com; it should be accessed with Netscape-compatible software. Selecting the site leads to a screen offering icons for reservations; mileage plan; destination information, with a list of cities that Alaska Airlines flies to or from; and reservations.Selecting "reservations" brings up a form to be filled out on the screen: departure date, departure time, number of passengers, choice of cabin, return date and time.
FEATURES
By James Brooke and James Brooke,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 30, 1997
For most of the 20th century, Russia's Far East has been off-limits to Americans. The closest part of Russia to the United States, Russia east of Siberia, seemed also the most forbidding. Among its sites: Magadan, port of entry to Stalin's Arctic gold mines; Sakhalin Island, home base to the Soviet fighter that shot down Korean Air Lines Flight 007; and Vladivostok, a city closed to all Westerners when it was home port to the Soviet Pacific fleet.But the ice curtain has melted, and Alaska Airlines is building a network of flights between Seattle and Anchorage and Russia's back door.
TRAVEL
By Barry Estabrook and Barry Estabrook,New York Times News Service | March 21, 2004
Normally, late spring weekends find Nancy Civetta out on Cape Cod visiting friends and family in the town of Wellfleet. But late last May, she had to waste a warm, sunny Sunday in an overcrowded departure lounge at San Francisco International Airport waiting for a badly delayed United Airlines flight. Civetta, who owns a small public relations company in Cambridge, Mass., was a victim of the airline industry's dreaded Saturday-night stay-over rule. To get a reasonably priced ticket, she had to remain an extra night, even though the conference in Monterey she had flown out to attend ended Friday evening.
NEWS
By TROY MCCULLOUGH | January 8, 2006
Jeremy Hermanns has had a rough couple of weeks. The California resident recently blogged about a scare he had on an airliner Dec. 26 and has been hammered for it ever since. Such is the life of a citizen journalist in an age of hyper media criticism. Twenty minutes into Hermanns' Alaska Airlines flight from Seattle to Burbank, Calif., the cabin lost pressure, oxygen masks deployed and the plane rapidly descended. The plane returned to Seattle-Tacoma International Airport and landed safely 25 minutes later.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
Alaska Airlines , which today announced new flights between Baltimore and Seattle, is launching its new service at BWI-Marshall Airport with a fare sale . The airline will offer daily inbound and outbound service between BWI and Seattle-Tacoma International Airport beginning Sept. 2.  Travelers can fly nonstop to Seattle for $119 one-way. Sale fares must be booked by April 3 and require travel on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Saturdays. Travel must be completed by Nov. 19. Alaska Airlines will provide the only year-round nonstop flights to Seattle.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2013
Southwest Airlines has joined the Transportation Security Administration's PreCheck program, giving trusted fliers access to a quicker and less invasive path through security at BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport. The airline, which is BWI's largest carrier, has opened a PreCheck security lane at Concourse A, airport officials said Thursday. The program allows registered passengers of participating airlines — Southwest makes eight — to move through security without taking off their shoes, belts or jackets, removing laptop computers from cases or removing bags of small liquids from carry-on luggage.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2013
More security lines will be opened under the TSA PreCheck program at BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport starting Tuesday, giving trusted travelers another option for expedited screening. Travelers who sign-up and qualify for the program are allowed to move through security without dealing with some of the hassles associated with airport security — such as taking off shoes, belts and jackets, removing small lotions or other hygiene items from carry-on luggage and removing laptops from cases.
BUSINESS
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2011
If you thought our government was dysfunctional over the looming debt ceiling debacle, it's really just one example of multiple layers of crazy inside the Washington Beltway. And, as always, it seems to boil down to the dirtiest five-letter word politicians claim to have ever heard: taxes. In this case, we're talking about airline taxes. As of now, travelers should be saving about 7-10 percent on airfares because of a budget meltdown that has put the Federal Aviation Administration into a tailspin and denied it the ability - temporarily - to collect taxes or even function.
NEWS
July 1, 2007
Inez J. Baskin, a journalist and civil rights supporter who covered the Montgomery bus boycott, died Thursday at a Montgomery hospital. Ms. Baskin was a reporter for the Montgomery Advertiser. The Advertiser, which first reported her death, said that when the boycott was organized after Rosa Parks' arrest in 1955, Ms. Baskin was hired to cover the boycott for Jet magazine as well. Ms. Baskin took a seat in front of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. when Montgomery's buses were finally desegregated.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Higgins and Michelle Higgins,New York Times News Service | December 31, 2006
On his way home to Washington last month from a business trip, Don Alberstadt, a quality assurance auditor, stood in line at the US Airways ticket counter in San Diego for 45 minutes, waiting to check his bag and check in for his nonstop flight to Washington, US Airways Flight 6560. But when he reached the desk, a US Airways agent told him there was no Flight 6560 - even though the itinerary he received from a corporate travel agency displayed that number and the US Airways logo. Alberstadt, it turns out, was booked on a code-share flight, sold by US Airways but operated by United Airlines.
NEWS
July 1, 2007
Inez J. Baskin, a journalist and civil rights supporter who covered the Montgomery bus boycott, died Thursday at a Montgomery hospital. Ms. Baskin was a reporter for the Montgomery Advertiser. The Advertiser, which first reported her death, said that when the boycott was organized after Rosa Parks' arrest in 1955, Ms. Baskin was hired to cover the boycott for Jet magazine as well. Ms. Baskin took a seat in front of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. when Montgomery's buses were finally desegregated.
BUSINESS
June 23, 2001
In the Region Columbia insurer wins big contract with Michigan agency Magellan Health Services Inc. of Columbia said yesterday that its mental health division won a four-year, $20 million contract to manage mental health and substance abuse benefits for a government agency in Michigan's largest county. The Detroit-Wayne County Community Mental Health Agency hired Magellan to provide administrative services, care coordina- tion and claims administration for county citizens who have mental illnesses, addictive disorders and developmental disabilities.
NEWS
By TROY MCCULLOUGH | January 8, 2006
Jeremy Hermanns has had a rough couple of weeks. The California resident recently blogged about a scare he had on an airliner Dec. 26 and has been hammered for it ever since. Such is the life of a citizen journalist in an age of hyper media criticism. Twenty minutes into Hermanns' Alaska Airlines flight from Seattle to Burbank, Calif., the cabin lost pressure, oxygen masks deployed and the plane rapidly descended. The plane returned to Seattle-Tacoma International Airport and landed safely 25 minutes later.
TRAVEL
By Beverly Beyette and Beverly Beyette,Los Angeles Times | February 27, 2005
Native Americans named it Walla Walla, "place of many waters," but it's wine that's bringing the visitors to this town of about 30,000, once best known for its funny name and for a tear-free variety of onion. "We're kind of a destination now," said Jerry "Spud" Cundiff, who has lived in Walla Walla for 75 of his 77 years. Cundiff, who's semi-retired, can be found, key in hand, at 7 o'clock every Friday morning winding Main Street's landmark 1906 clock outside Falkenberg's, his family's jewelry store.
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