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By Adele Evans and Adele Evans,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 5, 2003
Baltimore County Police Detective Sgt. Darryl DeSousa has seen many types of burglars. Some just grab and go - others case a home for days, calculate exactly when the owners are away, put on a disguise and make their move. During the past two years, however, DeSousa can't recall a single burglary when a home's alarm system went off and the burglar got away with something of value. The primary reason alarms work: Crooks want to be in and out quickly, he said. Any inconvenience is a reason to go to the next house.
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ENTERTAINMENT
Ethan Renner and For The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2013
"This is wrong, all wrong. Murder. All rot and black. This will not be forgiven," muses Misty Day in the opening sequence of this episode of "American Horror Story: Coven. " "Boy Parts" deals with themes of life, death and the longing deep within all of us to feel as though we're not alone; it did so, of course, in the campy, schlocky way that "American Horror Story" deals with everything. It seems that Misty, back from the dead after being burned at the stake last week, has something of a soft spot for gators -- she brings one back to life and has it drag its killers into a Louisiana swamp for lunch.
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NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | June 2, 1999
Baltimore County police will begin enforcing a new law next month requiring homeowners to register their alarm systems -- and to pay fines for repeated false alarms, authorities said yesterday.Starting July 1, homeowners whose systems produce repeated false alarms face the possibility of fines that escalate from $50 to $1,000, county police said. Businesses have been covered by the law since December, leading to a decrease in false alarms and an increase in false-alarm calls that were canceled before police arrived.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2011
Todd Ferrante, an Ocean City business owner and resident, was surveying the storm's damage Sunday morning at about 8 a.m. from the boardwalk, which had some small piles of sand caked to it. The damage he saw, he said, was cosmetic. "I have to say, Ocean City was lucky again," Ferrante said. He was looking for signs of wear at the Kite Loft, a store on the boardwalk that is in the first row of businesses along the shore, that his friend owns. The only damage he had to report back to the store's owner was one shingle missing from the roof.
BUSINESS
By Knight Ridder News Service | December 9, 2001
PHILADELPHIA - If you're feeling a bit insecure these days, you're in good company. Home-security firms nationwide have reported a surge in interest in alarm systems since the World Trade Center and Pentagon attacks Sept. 11. There is no evidence that terrorists are singling out individual houses. But even in wartime, there are burglaries. Statistically, at least, the incidence of break-ins and thefts increases whenever the economy weakens. Center City Philadelphia is a good example.
BUSINESS
By Patricia Horn and Patricia Horn,Sun Staff Writer The New York Times News Service contributed to this article | October 2, 1994
The growing belief that today no one is safe, even in the suburbs, has fueled an explosive rise in the number of home security alarms over the last 20 years. Today, 1 in 6 homes has such a system, with 1 million new homeowners coming on line each year.And more and more builders are installing them in new homes. A survey of 428 builders in February by the National Association of Home Builders, a trade group in Washington, found that alarm systems were offered as standard features in 13 percent of new homes and as options in 63 percent of new homes.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | February 23, 1992
Who says crime doesn't pay?Crime and the fear of crime have turned home security into a growth industry.Sales of residential alarm systems have risen 80 percent since 1986 and totaled $1.4 billion last year. Looking at the broader market, which includes the protection of commercial and industrial sites, security becomes a $16 billion-a-year business.The increase in crime is just one of the reasons for the growth in home security systems. A dramatic drop in the installation price of home alarm systems paralleled by a rise in the number of two-income families is another factor.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2000
The increasing number of false alarms from commercial and home security systems has cost Howard County more than $1 million, and officials want to make users pay. In legislation proposed by County Executive James N. Robey, residents with security systems would have to pay as much as $1,000 in fines for false alarms, as well as a one-time $35 fee to register their systems with the county Police Department. "Our ultimate goal is to hold alarm users responsible and accountable for the operation of their system," police Chief Wayne Livesay said.
NEWS
May 13, 1997
BALTIMORE COUNTY wasted $5 million of taxpayer money responding to false burglar alarms last year. Other local jurisdictions wasted millions more. Pets, windstorms and homeowners and hired help who don't know how security systems work are tripping alarms at alarming rates.In 1996, Baltimore County police responded to 77,000 bogus calls, about 17 percent of all police calls. The problem is not local. Police departments across the country are faced with significant losses of money and manpower caused by home and business alarm systems.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | August 4, 1999
Nobody likes even the threat of a fine.A new Baltimore County law fining businesses for more than two false-alarm calls appears to be working, freeing Baltimore County police officers who wasted time responding to the calls.From January through June, the number of false-alarm calls dropped to 39,693, from 42,970 for the same period last year, according to a report released by county police this week. Police say they might answer 10,000 fewer alarm calls than they had expected for this year.
NEWS
By Madison Park and Madison Park,Sun reporter | July 8, 2007
Business owners and homeowners would pay higher fines when county fire and police respond to false alarms, under measures to be introduced this week in the Harford County Council. Councilman Dion F. Guthrie, an Edgewood Democrat, said he plans to introduce two bills Tuesday that would increase fees for false alarms resulting in a response by county sheriff's deputies and firefighters. "The sheriffs and the Fire Department have been nagged with many false alarms, and a lot of it is because people neglect their equipment, or the alarm goes off and they don't bother to call," Guthrie said.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | March 13, 2005
"Alert. Firebox 301. Company 3," the radio at the Bel Air Volunteer Fire Co. on Hickory Avenue suddenly barks out. In a room next to where the trucks are parked, firefighters spring to action. Within two minutes, they have donned their protective gear and boarded the big truck moving out the door, its sirens blaring and light flashing. Moving as fast as safety allows, the truck weaves on streets leading to a government office building on Bond Street. But something's wrong - the firefighters see no smoke.
BUSINESS
By Adele Evans and Adele Evans,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 5, 2003
Baltimore County Police Detective Sgt. Darryl DeSousa has seen many types of burglars. Some just grab and go - others case a home for days, calculate exactly when the owners are away, put on a disguise and make their move. During the past two years, however, DeSousa can't recall a single burglary when a home's alarm system went off and the burglar got away with something of value. The primary reason alarms work: Crooks want to be in and out quickly, he said. Any inconvenience is a reason to go to the next house.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | May 7, 2002
Baltimore County has had its second sewage spill in a week - this time 190,000 gallons that poured into waterways in Dundalk before the spill was stopped yesterday. The spill, which began Sunday, lasted through yesterday morning because a pumping station alarm system failed to work, county officials said. "The alarm did not go off," said Elise Armacost, a county spokeswoman. "[Workers] found it when they went on a routine check this morning." The raw sewage flowed into School House Cove and Bear Creek, Armacost said.
BUSINESS
By Knight Ridder News Service | December 9, 2001
PHILADELPHIA - If you're feeling a bit insecure these days, you're in good company. Home-security firms nationwide have reported a surge in interest in alarm systems since the World Trade Center and Pentagon attacks Sept. 11. There is no evidence that terrorists are singling out individual houses. But even in wartime, there are burglaries. Statistically, at least, the incidence of break-ins and thefts increases whenever the economy weakens. Center City Philadelphia is a good example.
NEWS
By Louise Branson | December 3, 2001
LONDON - As best friends go, you can't get much tighter than the United States and Britain, particularly these days. British Prime Minister Tony Blair is so identified with America, what with his full-scale support of the war on terrorism, that some of the British media regularly refer to him as the de facto U.S. secretary of state. Nobody really remembers those earlier days this year when the famous "special relationship" looked shaky, when Mr. Blair seemed to have far more in common with former President Bill Clinton and seemed to be struggling to find genuine rapport with the new President Bush.
NEWS
October 7, 1992
Harford County's new law that levies escalating fines for false burglar alarms goes into effect this week and none too soon, for both the protection and financial benefit of the community.In a world panicked by the spread of crime and vandalism, the proliferation of private security alarms has been an inevitable response, particularly in homes that employ security alert services (up 40 percent in the U.S. since 1987). Yet with Murphy's Law in full force, the systems seem bound to misfire with disturbing frequency.
NEWS
May 13, 1997
ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY wasted $3.3 million of taxpayer money responding to false burglar alarms last year. Other local jurisdictions wasted millions more. Pets, windstorms and homeowners and hired help who don't know how security systems work are tripping alarms at alarming rates.In 1996, Anne Arundel police responded to 25,336 bogus calls, about 12 percent of all police calls. The problem is not local. Police departments across the country are faced with significant losses of money and manpower caused by home and business alarm systems.
NEWS
July 23, 2000
Direct designations help worthwhile nonprofit groups The July 13 article "United Way donations still being earmarked" did not make clear that many worthwhile nonprofit organizations benefit from direct designations through United Way payroll campaigns. United Way agencies must restrict their funds to the local community. Because many health agencies support research nationally, they cannot be United Way agencies. Instead, 25 local health agencies are part of a federation, "Community Health Charities."
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2000
The increasing number of false alarms from commercial and home security systems has cost Howard County more than $1 million, and officials want to make users pay. In legislation proposed by County Executive James N. Robey, residents with security systems would have to pay as much as $1,000 in fines for false alarms, as well as a one-time $35 fee to register their systems with the county Police Department. "Our ultimate goal is to hold alarm users responsible and accountable for the operation of their system," police Chief Wayne Livesay said.
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