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By Will Englund and Gary Cohn | December 9, 1997
ALANG, India -- The last voyage of the Nikolai Pogodin, a Russian freighter plagued by debt and barnacles, ended in the hopeless hour before dawn on the beach at Plot No. 20.The lights of the Pogodin glimmered out in the bay, seeming for a long time not to be moving - but the ship was charging out of the dark night straight toward the beach at Alang. As it came closer, the outline of the hull became visible, set off by the white foam at the bow.Beaching a ship is a ticklish business. The current runs strong.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2011
At the end of its seafaring days, the former S.S. France, which had been described as the "paradigm of elegance, style and speed" and had been transformed into the cruise ship Norway and finally the Blue Lady, was towed in 2006 to the Indian port of Alang, south of Mumbai. Here the tug dropped the great ship with the distinctive winged funnels in the shallows, where it waited with the other doomed liners for teams of scrappers to perform their ugly handiwork. "The imminent death of a beloved ship triggers regret, and Blue Lady-ex-Norway-ex-France proved no exception," writes John Maxtone-Graham in his recently published book, "France/Norway.
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NEWS
By Will Englund and Gary Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 1997
The last voyage of the Nikolai Pogodin, a Russian freighter plagued by debt and barnacles, ended in the hopeless hour before dawn on the beach at Plot No. 20.The lights of the Pogodin glimmered out in the bay, seeming for a long time not to be moving - but the ship was charging out of the dark night straight toward the beach at Alang. As it came closer, the outline of the hull became visible, set off by the white foam at the bow. Beaching a ship is a ticklish business. The current runs strong.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Gary Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 1997
The last voyage of the Nikolai Pogodin, a Russian freighter plagued by debt and barnacles, ended in the hopeless hour before dawn on the beach at Plot No. 20.The lights of the Pogodin glimmered out in the bay, seeming for a long time not to be moving - but the ship was charging out of the dark night straight toward the beach at Alang. As it came closer, the outline of the hull became visible, set off by the white foam at the bow. Beaching a ship is a ticklish business. The current runs strong.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2011
At the end of its seafaring days, the former S.S. France, which had been described as the "paradigm of elegance, style and speed" and had been transformed into the cruise ship Norway and finally the Blue Lady, was towed in 2006 to the Indian port of Alang, south of Mumbai. Here the tug dropped the great ship with the distinctive winged funnels in the shallows, where it waited with the other doomed liners for teams of scrappers to perform their ugly handiwork. "The imminent death of a beloved ship triggers regret, and Blue Lady-ex-Norway-ex-France proved no exception," writes John Maxtone-Graham in his recently published book, "France/Norway.
NEWS
By WILL ENGLUND AND GARY COHN and WILL ENGLUND AND GARY COHN,SUN STAFF Sun researchers Jean L. Packard, Robert Schrott and Paul McCardell contributed to this series | December 9, 1997
ALANG, India -- This is where the world dumps its ships, worn out and ready to be torn apart.To the left and right, ships lie stranded along six miles of beach, in a hundred stages of demolition. Tankers, freighters, fish processors and destroyers -- smashed, cut, rusting, smoking -- are packed close together. This is the end of the line.Thirty-five thousand men have come to this once-deserted stretch on the Arabian Sea to labor for the shipbreakers. They live in hovels built of scrap, with no showers, toilets or latrines.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Gary Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 1997
This is where the world dumps its ships, worn out and ready to be torn apart.To the left and right, ships lie stranded along six miles of beach, in a hundred stages of demolition. Tankers, freighters, fish processors and destroyers -- smashed, cut, rusting, smoking -- are packed close together. This is the end of the line. Thirty-five thousand men have come to this once-deserted stretch on the Arabian Sea to labor for the shipbreakers. They live in hovels built of scrap, with no showers, toilets or latrines.
NEWS
September 4, 2011
Gunpowder nature hike Wednesday , Gunpowder Falls State Park, Masemore Road. The Hereford area of the Gunpowder houses some rare native plants. This three-mile hike will be very slow, but there will be some steep hills and a scramble over rocks. Call 410-366-7239 for details. Seeds of success Monday , 11 a.m.-noon, Cunningham Falls State Park, 14039 Catoctin Hollow Road, Thurmont. Meet a naturalist at the Manor Area Visitor Center to learn all about seeds.
NEWS
December 9, 1997
THE WORST WAY the Navy could react to the scandal of unsafe work and pollution in the breaking up of its old ships would be to move the work offshore to even worse facilities with more vile records of contempt for human life. Yet as it chases shady operators run out of one state by the Environmental Protection Administration to another, that is what the Navy is tempted to do.The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) -- to its eternal shame -- this summer exempted the Navy from rules banning the export of ships containing PCBs.
NEWS
April 15, 1998
A NEW WORD entered the vocabulary of many Sun readers with the publication last year of a series of articles detailing the shameful practices within the "shipbreaking" industry.The Sun stories looked at the unsafe work conditions and pollution in the Port of Baltimore, in other U.S. port cities and in Third World countries brought about by shady operators of companies that break up old ships, many of them once-proud members of the U.S. Navy's fleet. It forced the federal government to re-examine its collusion in shipbreaking activities.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Gary Cohn | December 9, 1997
ALANG, India -- The last voyage of the Nikolai Pogodin, a Russian freighter plagued by debt and barnacles, ended in the hopeless hour before dawn on the beach at Plot No. 20.The lights of the Pogodin glimmered out in the bay, seeming for a long time not to be moving - but the ship was charging out of the dark night straight toward the beach at Alang. As it came closer, the outline of the hull became visible, set off by the white foam at the bow.Beaching a ship is a ticklish business. The current runs strong.
NEWS
By Gary Cohn and Gary Cohn,SUN STAFF | January 29, 1998
The federal Maritime Administration has suspended a plan to send its old ships overseas for disposal amid increasing criticism that scrapping the vessels abroad would exploit Third World workers and harm the environment.The maritime agency said it was suspending the controversial export plan while a high-level Defense Department panel reviews how government ships are scrapped. The panel, scheduled to meet for the first time next week, is to recommend within 60 days how to ensure that workers and the environment are protected during scrapping.
NEWS
September 25, 1998
THE CLINTON administration this week moved to temporarily ban the overseas sales of U.S. ships for dismantling. Better late than never.The executive memo, issued by Vice President Al Gore, means the U.S. Navy and the Maritime Administration will end their complicity with the environmentally unsound and dangerous offshore shipbreaking industry, at least for the next year. The memo, which has the force of law, is a victory for the environment and, therefore, all of us.But it especially benefits the poorly paid and untrained workers in the wretched shipyards of South Asia described in a series of articles last year by Sun reporters Gary Cohn and Will Englund.
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