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By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 8, 2004
Was that Professor Snape dining at Kali's Court recently? Sans the black wig and cape he dons in the Harry Potter films, Alan Rickman looked positively Brit-cool in black leather. Ladies, think an updated version of Rickman's Colonel Brandon in 1995's Sense and Sensibility. Or his evil Hans Gruber (keep the sexy, lose the sinister) from 1988's Die Hard. Rickman is in town filming an HBO flick. But he's going neither sexy nor sinister this time around. In Something the Lord Made, Rickman plays the late Johns Hopkins cardiologist Alfred Blalock, who with his research assistant Vivien Thomas (portrayed by Mos Def)
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NEWS
May 12, 2009
DVD Galaxy Quest: Deluxe Edition *** 1/2 (3 1/2 stars) Starring Tim Allen, Sigourney Weaver, Alan Rickman. Directed by Dean Parisot. Released by Dreamworks Video. $14.95. With a renewed and reinvigorated Star Trek blasting off of movie screens everywhere, what better time to revisit the gentle but hilarious Trek parody, 1999's Galaxy Quest? Apparently, Dreamworks thought the same, taking the opportunity to release this deluxe edition. To adapt a catchphrase from Dr. Lazarus (Alan Rickman)
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By Lou Cedrone | June 13, 1991
* ''Robin Hood, Prince of Thieves'' The much-awaited film in which Kevin Costner is the bandit chief who takes from the poor and gives to the rich. Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio is Maid Marian, and Alan Rickman is the evil sheriff of Nottingham.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | August 15, 2008
In a 1976 event that became known as "The Judgment of Paris," California wines beat French ones in a blind taste test. Bottle Shock wastes that intriguing bit of history and some seductive Napa Valley settings on a bland script that's part period piece, part underdog fable. Alan Rickman swans his way through the role of the expatriate Brit who sets up the contest with wine experts in Paris and then goes looking for the competition. Not even he can bring enough polish or pizazz to this ramble along the back roads of Northern California and through some stubborn pockets of the counterculture nine years after San Francisco's Summer of Love (and seven years after Woodstock)
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | October 6, 1995
Guaranteed literal dialogue from "An Awfully Big Adventure":"Eh? Hos gwinne dwan, mite?""Euwww, noffinx. Me dwags dwan't gribe, effo."That's because the movie is in real English -- the English of the British Isles -- rather than in that fictitious, bell-clear movie language known as Middle-Atlantic, constructed to be intelligible the colonies.Thus "An Awfully Big Adventure" seems to play as if through a fog, about a third of it knowable, the rest merely to be taken on faith. It may be too much.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | March 7, 2001
If you can get past some goshawful hairstyles masquerading as high art, you might find yourself mildly amused by "Blow Dry," a feel-good us-against-them tale that panders mercilessly to its audience, yet displays a few moments of honest humor. The tiny working-class English town of Keighley has a bit of the doldrums, but maybe that's about to change. The mayor (Warren Clarke) has persuaded the organizers of the British Hairstyling Championships to bring their show to town, and while the local citizenry seems underwhelmed by the news, he's sure this is the start of something big. One person you'd think would be excited is the local barber, Phil Allen (Alan Rickman)
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By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | February 6, 1998
Winter's austere beauty is beautifully evoked in "The Winter Guest." So, too, is the season's subtext: death. That shadowy visitor lingers as life, and even the restless ocean, freeze in a tableau of hushed conversations and yearning, waiting for the thaw.This small, lovely film, set in a Scottish village, is the first directed by actor Alan Rickman. The story, which takes place in one day, focuses on pairs of people: two boys cutting school and discussing their futures by a fire on the beach; two teen-agers who communicate more earnestly by touching than by talking; an aging woman and her daughter, who is mourning the death of the man she loves; and two elderly women who are obsessed with funerals.
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By Lou Cedrone | October 19, 1990
IF WHAT THE movie audience really needs at the moment is a good western, they have it in ''Quigley Down Under.''The film, opening here today, takes place in Australia, where it was filmed. It is still, however, a true American western.It has all the familiar elements, a strong hero, a very nasty villain, the girl with the past, a throbbing music score and one standoff after another.And it is all immensely entertaining. Tom Selleck stars. He plays an American sharpshooter who answers a want ad, one that takes him to Australia where he hopes to work for a landowner.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | August 15, 2008
In a 1976 event that became known as "The Judgment of Paris," California wines beat French ones in a blind taste test. Bottle Shock wastes that intriguing bit of history and some seductive Napa Valley settings on a bland script that's part period piece, part underdog fable. Alan Rickman swans his way through the role of the expatriate Brit who sets up the contest with wine experts in Paris and then goes looking for the competition. Not even he can bring enough polish or pizazz to this ramble along the back roads of Northern California and through some stubborn pockets of the counterculture nine years after San Francisco's Summer of Love (and seven years after Woodstock)
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | October 24, 1991
The only problem with "Truly, Madly, Deeply," which opens today at the Charles, is that it goes on endlessly, remorselessly, self-indulgently.This is deeply, truly, adverb-madly a shame, because for about an hour, it's quite amusing. It has been called a British "Ghost," since both it and the American film are about a young woman whose dead lover returns to her to complete a special mission. But of course "Truly" is nowhere near as sleek as the Paramount money machine. A cultural anthropologist could earn a Ph.D.
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By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun theater critic | January 18, 2008
It's silly statuette time once again, and chances are that Sweeney Todd, which picked up a recent Golden Globe award for best film musical, will be heavily nominated for the Academy Awards. While I applaud director Tim Burton for having come up with a fresh approach, I question the wisdom of stripping Stephen Sondheim's 1979 musical masterpiece of elements that audiences have relished for nearly three decades. The music, the scathingly witty dialogue - in the film, it all takes a back seat to the Grand Guignol-style plot.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 8, 2004
Was that Professor Snape dining at Kali's Court recently? Sans the black wig and cape he dons in the Harry Potter films, Alan Rickman looked positively Brit-cool in black leather. Ladies, think an updated version of Rickman's Colonel Brandon in 1995's Sense and Sensibility. Or his evil Hans Gruber (keep the sexy, lose the sinister) from 1988's Die Hard. Rickman is in town filming an HBO flick. But he's going neither sexy nor sinister this time around. In Something the Lord Made, Rickman plays the late Johns Hopkins cardiologist Alfred Blalock, who with his research assistant Vivien Thomas (portrayed by Mos Def)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 7, 2003
Love Actually oozes its sappy message from the opening voice-over narration: "General opinion's starting to make out that we live in a world of hatred and greed -- but I don't see that -- seems to me that love is everywhere. Often it's not particularly dignified or newsworthy -- but it's always there -- fathers & sons, mothers & daughters, husbands & wives, friends & strangers. If you look for it, I've got a sneaking suspicion that love is actually all around." Coming from first-time writer-director Richard Curtis, this is inexcusably coy: If anyone should know that the mass audience has been lapping love stuff up it should be the guy who provided the scripts for Four Weddings and a Funeral, Bridget Jones's Diary and Notting Hill.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | March 7, 2001
If you can get past some goshawful hairstyles masquerading as high art, you might find yourself mildly amused by "Blow Dry," a feel-good us-against-them tale that panders mercilessly to its audience, yet displays a few moments of honest humor. The tiny working-class English town of Keighley has a bit of the doldrums, but maybe that's about to change. The mayor (Warren Clarke) has persuaded the organizers of the British Hairstyling Championships to bring their show to town, and while the local citizenry seems underwhelmed by the news, he's sure this is the start of something big. One person you'd think would be excited is the local barber, Phil Allen (Alan Rickman)
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | February 6, 1998
Winter's austere beauty is beautifully evoked in "The Winter Guest." So, too, is the season's subtext: death. That shadowy visitor lingers as life, and even the restless ocean, freeze in a tableau of hushed conversations and yearning, waiting for the thaw.This small, lovely film, set in a Scottish village, is the first directed by actor Alan Rickman. The story, which takes place in one day, focuses on pairs of people: two boys cutting school and discussing their futures by a fire on the beach; two teen-agers who communicate more earnestly by touching than by talking; an aging woman and her daughter, who is mourning the death of the man she loves; and two elderly women who are obsessed with funerals.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | October 6, 1995
Guaranteed literal dialogue from "An Awfully Big Adventure":"Eh? Hos gwinne dwan, mite?""Euwww, noffinx. Me dwags dwan't gribe, effo."That's because the movie is in real English -- the English of the British Isles -- rather than in that fictitious, bell-clear movie language known as Middle-Atlantic, constructed to be intelligible the colonies.Thus "An Awfully Big Adventure" seems to play as if through a fog, about a third of it knowable, the rest merely to be taken on faith. It may be too much.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun theater critic | January 18, 2008
It's silly statuette time once again, and chances are that Sweeney Todd, which picked up a recent Golden Globe award for best film musical, will be heavily nominated for the Academy Awards. While I applaud director Tim Burton for having come up with a fresh approach, I question the wisdom of stripping Stephen Sondheim's 1979 musical masterpiece of elements that audiences have relished for nearly three decades. The music, the scathingly witty dialogue - in the film, it all takes a back seat to the Grand Guignol-style plot.
NEWS
May 12, 2009
DVD Galaxy Quest: Deluxe Edition *** 1/2 (3 1/2 stars) Starring Tim Allen, Sigourney Weaver, Alan Rickman. Directed by Dean Parisot. Released by Dreamworks Video. $14.95. With a renewed and reinvigorated Star Trek blasting off of movie screens everywhere, what better time to revisit the gentle but hilarious Trek parody, 1999's Galaxy Quest? Apparently, Dreamworks thought the same, taking the opportunity to release this deluxe edition. To adapt a catchphrase from Dr. Lazarus (Alan Rickman)
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | October 24, 1991
The only problem with "Truly, Madly, Deeply," which opens today at the Charles, is that it goes on endlessly, remorselessly, self-indulgently.This is deeply, truly, adverb-madly a shame, because for about an hour, it's quite amusing. It has been called a British "Ghost," since both it and the American film are about a young woman whose dead lover returns to her to complete a special mission. But of course "Truly" is nowhere near as sleek as the Paramount money machine. A cultural anthropologist could earn a Ph.D.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | June 14, 1991
Like a famous timepiece, the timeless piece that is the Robin Hood legend can take a licking and keep on ticking.The latest parvenus to deliver a licking are the two American Kevins, Costner and Reynolds, who have hastily cobbled together "Robin Hood, Prince of Thieves," to much fame and anticipation and at a $50 million price tag. It has a lot of things wrong with it but in the end, the old story is so strong that it transcends the degradations; it keeps...
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