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By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2012
It will become a lot easier to obtain permits to conceal and carry guns in Maryland as of Aug. 7 under a court order filed Tuesday by a federal district judge. The order signed Monday by Judge Benson E. Legg gives state officials two weeks to implement his March ruling striking down a requirement that concealed carry applicants show a "good and substantial reason" to transport a firearm. The requirement prevented many from applying for permits, according to gun proponents who expect tens of thousands of state residents to seek — and be granted — such licenses.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2013
The U.S. Supreme Court said Tuesday that it will not examine Maryland's handgun permit law, leaving to stand a lower court ruling that the state's restrictive rules for carry permits do not unconstitutionally infringe upon gun-owners' rights. The justices did not explain their reasoning, but the decision intensified a simmering dispute over the limits of firearms restrictions. Other challenges are pending in federal courts — including two in Maryland attacking the state's new ban on military-style assault rifles and its requirements for fingerprinting and training of buyers before they can purchase handguns.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2012
On a roll in recent years, a gun-rights group pressed its advantage in a federal appeals court Wednesday, seeking to extend Second Amendment rights through a challenge to Maryland's handgun permit laws. "We're not challenging the constitutionality of having a licensing system," Alan Gura, a lawyer for the Second Amendment Foundation, told the three-judge panel in a case involving a Baltimore County man's permit renewal. Rather, he argued that Maryland unnecessarily restricts the right to carry firearms.
NEWS
By David G. Savage and Justin Fenton, Tribune Newspapers | April 15, 2013
The Supreme Court left in doubt Monday whether gun owners have a Second-Amendment right to carry a firearm in public, declining to hear a case about concealed-carry laws that is similar to a Maryland suit that still has life in federal courts. Without a comment or dissent, the justices turned down a gun-rights challenge to the New York law, which strictly limits who can legally carry a weapon on the streets. To obtain a concealed carry permit, New Yorkers must convince a county official that they have a "special need for protection" that goes beyond living or working in a high-crime area.
NEWS
By David G. Savage and Justin Fenton, Tribune Newspapers | April 15, 2013
The Supreme Court left in doubt Monday whether gun owners have a Second-Amendment right to carry a firearm in public, declining to hear a case about concealed-carry laws that is similar to a Maryland suit that still has life in federal courts. Without a comment or dissent, the justices turned down a gun-rights challenge to the New York law, which strictly limits who can legally carry a weapon on the streets. To obtain a concealed carry permit, New Yorkers must convince a county official that they have a "special need for protection" that goes beyond living or working in a high-crime area.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2013
The U.S. Supreme Court said Tuesday that it will not examine Maryland's handgun permit law, leaving to stand a lower court ruling that the state's restrictive rules for carry permits do not unconstitutionally infringe upon gun-owners' rights. The justices did not explain their reasoning, but the decision intensified a simmering dispute over the limits of firearms restrictions. Other challenges are pending in federal courts — including two in Maryland attacking the state's new ban on military-style assault rifles and its requirements for fingerprinting and training of buyers before they can purchase handguns.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2013
A federal appeals court has upheld Maryland's handgun permitting law, reversing a lower court decision by concluding that the state can constitutionally require an applicant to show “good and substantial reason” that he or she needs a concealed-carry license. Fourth Circuit Judge Robert King, writing for the three-judge panel, said the state had shown that the requirement “is reasonably adapted” to its “significant interests in protecting public safety and preventing crime.” Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler cheered the ruling Thursday, saying the state is “a safer place today because of its handgun conceal-and-carry permit laws.” “The idea is to make sure guns are in the hands of responsible people, and not just anybody who wants to tote a gun in public,” Gansler said.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2012
A Baltimore County gun owner, whose federal lawsuit led a judge this month to declare a portion of Maryland's gun laws unconstitutional, has filed a court motion to protect the ruling, which would make it easier for state residents to carry firearms. Attorneys for Raymond Woollard filed the 29-page document in Baltimore's U.S. District Court at the close of business Friday in response to a filing last week by the Maryland attorney general's office, which sought clarification and a delay of the judge's order so the agency could have time to appeal.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2012
A woman who police said ran down a Bolton Hill street firing a pistol into the air while chasing a man who had just robbed her boyfriend at gunpoint was ordered jailed Wednesday on $35,000 bail. The .40-caliber Beretta that Keyna Oduyoye told police she used to scare off two attackers Monday night on Bolton Street was registered legally, authorities said, but the Randallstown woman lacked a permit to carry the weapon. The couple had set up a meeting with the men to buy a car advertised on Craigslist.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2012
A week before Maryland's gun permit laws were set to loosen under a federal ruling allowing more people to carry concealed firearms in the state, the U.S. 4th Circuit Court of Appeals on Wednesday delayed the shift. The court, which issued its order pending an appeal, set an expedited schedule to take up the case — and the question of whether the Maryland State Police have discretion in granting concealed carry permits. It tentatively set arguments for late October. The court order comes amid a nationwide debate over access to guns.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2013
A federal appeals court has upheld Maryland's handgun permitting law, reversing a lower court decision by concluding that the state can constitutionally require an applicant to show “good and substantial reason” that he or she needs a concealed-carry license. Fourth Circuit Judge Robert King, writing for the three-judge panel, said the state had shown that the requirement “is reasonably adapted” to its “significant interests in protecting public safety and preventing crime.” Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler cheered the ruling Thursday, saying the state is “a safer place today because of its handgun conceal-and-carry permit laws.” “The idea is to make sure guns are in the hands of responsible people, and not just anybody who wants to tote a gun in public,” Gansler said.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2012
On a roll in recent years, a gun-rights group pressed its advantage in a federal appeals court Wednesday, seeking to extend Second Amendment rights through a challenge to Maryland's handgun permit laws. "We're not challenging the constitutionality of having a licensing system," Alan Gura, a lawyer for the Second Amendment Foundation, told the three-judge panel in a case involving a Baltimore County man's permit renewal. Rather, he argued that Maryland unnecessarily restricts the right to carry firearms.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2012
It will become a lot easier to obtain permits to conceal and carry guns in Maryland as of Aug. 7 under a court order filed Tuesday by a federal district judge. The order signed Monday by Judge Benson E. Legg gives state officials two weeks to implement his March ruling striking down a requirement that concealed carry applicants show a "good and substantial reason" to transport a firearm. The requirement prevented many from applying for permits, according to gun proponents who expect tens of thousands of state residents to seek — and be granted — such licenses.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2011
A national gun control advocacy group weighed in Tuesday on a federal lawsuit that challenges Maryland's handgun permit laws, saying that the changes sought would be "bad law and even worse policy. " In an amicus brief, the Brady Center to Prevent Gun Violence urges the dismissal of a lawsuit brought last year by the Second Amendment Foundation on behalf of Hampstead resident Raymond Woollard, a Navy veteran who was denied a renewal of his handgun permit. Brady Center President Paul Helmke said in a statement that Maryland has "wisely rejected the gun lobby's agenda of 'any gun, anywhere for anybody.' Now the gun pushers want the courts to gut Maryland's laws and let virtually anyone carry a hidden handgun in public.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2013
The Baltimore County burglar who helped trigger an ongoing constitutional challenge to Maryland's handgun laws shot himself to death, police said, after he assaulted his estranged wife and beat his parents with a pipe. Police found Kris Lee Abbott dead Monday in his Hampstead home, where police said he had barricaded himself after a domestic dispute. An earlier confrontation made Abbott a key figure in the challenge to the state handgun law. In 2002 he broke into the home of his father-in-law, Raymond Woollard, who then sought a concealed-weapon permit for protection from Abbott.
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