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By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
 An Emmy-winning actor, Peabody Award-winning documentarian and longtime CBS anchorman are among the seven personalities coming to town for the 2014-15 Baltimore Speakers Series. The Tuesday-evening series, presented by Stevenson University, kicks off Sept. 30 with Alan Alda, the Emmy-winning star of CBS's landmark TV series "M*A*S*H," and ends April 28, 2015 with former CBS anchorman Dan Rather. Other speakers in the series include former Australia Prime Minister Julia Gillard (Oct.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
 An Emmy-winning actor, Peabody Award-winning documentarian and longtime CBS anchorman are among the seven personalities coming to town for the 2014-15 Baltimore Speakers Series. The Tuesday-evening series, presented by Stevenson University, kicks off Sept. 30 with Alan Alda, the Emmy-winning star of CBS's landmark TV series "M*A*S*H," and ends April 28, 2015 with former CBS anchorman Dan Rather. Other speakers in the series include former Australia Prime Minister Julia Gillard (Oct.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2005
"I'm not going to give you any clues." -- Alan Alda, on who will win the presidential election on the next season of NBC's The West Wing, via AP Radio.
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By LYNN ELBER | December 17, 2005
LOS ANGELES -- John Spencer, who played a tough and dedicated politico on The West Wing who survived a serious illness to run for vice president, died of a heart attack yesterday. He was 58. Mr. Spencer died at a Los Angeles hospital, said his publicist, Ron Hofmann. He would have been 59 next week. Mr. Spencer played Leo McGarry, the savvy and powerful chief of staff to President Jeb Bartlet (Martin Sheen), on the NBC series. In a sad parallel to life, Mr. Spencer's character suffered a heart attack that forced him to give up his White House job. McGarry recovered and was picked as a running mate for Democratic presidential contender Matt Santos, played by Jimmy Smits; the campaign against Republican Arnold Vinick (Alan Alda)
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By Steve McKerrow | November 24, 1990
JILLY'S, 1012 Reisterstown Road, Pikesville. Open Monday through Thursday 11 a.m. to 11 p.m., Friday and Saturday 11 a.m. to midnight and Sunday noon to 10 p.m. Phone: 653-9029.In an old episode of "M*A*S*H," Hawkeye (Alan Alda) goes to great lengths to ship to Korea an order of barbecued ribs from a Chicago eatery. Remember? He never gets to eat them, but the show perfectly illustrates the true rib lover's sometimes insatiable addiction.There's something about the tangy, sweet taste of a good ribs sauce.
FEATURES
By Hollywood Reporter | June 11, 1995
Too bad Michael Moore didn't bring his camera crew to Cannes recently.Wandering along the Croisette, observing all the wonderful nonsense, he might have made a documentary to rival "Roger & Me," his smart 1989 satire of the devastation visited on his hometown of Flint, Mich., when General Motors head Roger Smith shut down the auto factories.Mr. Moore was in Cannes for the film festival and the world premiere of his first feature film, "Canadian Bacon," which stars the late John Candy. The $10 million "Canadian Bacon" was the source of a long battle between Mr. Moore and Propaganda Films, the PolyGram division that funded the film.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 17, 1997
Now and then, even the best of us get to phone one in. That's pretty much what Woody Allen does in "Everyone Says I Love You," a movie that seems to lose both its way and its convictions as it wanders along.Not that it's bad. In fact, it's frequently quite amusing as a bunch of charming but over-matched movie personalities uncertainly warble the music of Cole Porter, and others now and then essay a brave little sally into the world of dance. But it'll never make you forget "Singin' in the Rain"; it won't even make you remember it!
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | November 20, 1991
LET ME BEGIN by saying that I'm not much of a crier myself, although given the right circumstances (bill for a new transmission, "Ol' Yeller" re-runs), I can bawl like a baby.Men first began crying openly in the late '70s, encouraged by the likes of Alan Alda and Phil Donahue, weepy guys with three-pack-a-day Kleenex habits who weren't afraid to show they were sensitive, vulnerable and so forth.Women (at least some of them) seemed to go for this. So pretty soon you had a lot of guys with robin-egg-blue leisure suits sobbing on women's shoulders during everything from foreign film presentations to the hatching of baby chicks.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | September 25, 1992
Students of pop culture will recognize that crying among men is very big these days -- and not just with veteran crybabies like Jerry Lewis and Jimmy Swaggert and that ilk.The music industry is burgeoning with teary Michael Bolton-esque guys (only with better haircuts) singing about unrequited love.Hollywood churns out one film after another about weepy yuppie guys ("City Slickers" leaps to mind) getting in touch with their feelings. And on the TV talk shows, you have people like Geraldo Rivera bawling their little eyes out whether the topic is Husbands Who Wear High Heels or Impoverished Kids Who Also Lost Their Bunny Rabbits.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 17, 1998
"The Object of My Affection" is a Planet New York movie -- set in New York, but with none of the grit, grime or collective psychic fatigue that characterize the real place.Planet New York movies -- most recently "As Good As It Gets" and Woody Allen's recent oeuvre -- depict the city's poshest precincts, where even the most modest apartments are deliciously appointed, where names like Mailer and Styron and Pavarotti are dropped with impunity, where the Hamptons are visited at least once, and where, if someone is casually reading a magazine, it will surely be the New Yorker.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2005
"I'm not going to give you any clues." -- Alan Alda, on who will win the presidential election on the next season of NBC's The West Wing, via AP Radio.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 17, 1998
"The Object of My Affection" is a Planet New York movie -- set in New York, but with none of the grit, grime or collective psychic fatigue that characterize the real place.Planet New York movies -- most recently "As Good As It Gets" and Woody Allen's recent oeuvre -- depict the city's poshest precincts, where even the most modest apartments are deliciously appointed, where names like Mailer and Styron and Pavarotti are dropped with impunity, where the Hamptons are visited at least once, and where, if someone is casually reading a magazine, it will surely be the New Yorker.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 17, 1997
Now and then, even the best of us get to phone one in. That's pretty much what Woody Allen does in "Everyone Says I Love You," a movie that seems to lose both its way and its convictions as it wanders along.Not that it's bad. In fact, it's frequently quite amusing as a bunch of charming but over-matched movie personalities uncertainly warble the music of Cole Porter, and others now and then essay a brave little sally into the world of dance. But it'll never make you forget "Singin' in the Rain"; it won't even make you remember it!
FEATURES
By Hollywood Reporter | June 11, 1995
Too bad Michael Moore didn't bring his camera crew to Cannes recently.Wandering along the Croisette, observing all the wonderful nonsense, he might have made a documentary to rival "Roger & Me," his smart 1989 satire of the devastation visited on his hometown of Flint, Mich., when General Motors head Roger Smith shut down the auto factories.Mr. Moore was in Cannes for the film festival and the world premiere of his first feature film, "Canadian Bacon," which stars the late John Candy. The $10 million "Canadian Bacon" was the source of a long battle between Mr. Moore and Propaganda Films, the PolyGram division that funded the film.
FEATURES
By Jennifer Lowe and Jennifer Lowe,Orange County Register | November 13, 1993
The glint seems softer in his steely blue eyes.The taut jaw muscle is, well, less taut.He's more emotionally vulnerable and willing to show it.In his latest blockbuster, "In the Line of Fire," Clint Eastwood appears less studly, more appealing.It was bound to happen. Just as cycles of fashion come and go, so, too, do images of men.Gone like the yellow power tie is the Macho Man; forgotten like puka shells is the Sensitive Man.Say hello to the Man of the '90s -- The Manly Man."Yeah, Clint Eastwood.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | September 25, 1992
Students of pop culture will recognize that crying among men is very big these days -- and not just with veteran crybabies like Jerry Lewis and Jimmy Swaggert and that ilk.The music industry is burgeoning with teary Michael Bolton-esque guys (only with better haircuts) singing about unrequited love.Hollywood churns out one film after another about weepy yuppie guys ("City Slickers" leaps to mind) getting in touch with their feelings. And on the TV talk shows, you have people like Geraldo Rivera bawling their little eyes out whether the topic is Husbands Who Wear High Heels or Impoverished Kids Who Also Lost Their Bunny Rabbits.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | November 25, 1991
ON AND OFF THE AIR:* Here's a question that is not going to be answered by tonight's last nostalgia-fest show on CBS, "Memories of 'M*A*S*H' " (at 9:30, Channel 11): Why have so few regulars from the popular 11-season series returned to TV with anything approaching regularity?When, for example, was the last time you saw Gary Burghoff (Radar O'Reilly) in anything? It might have been those computer firm ads he and some of the other "M*A*S*H" gang did a few years back.The post-war years have not meant unemployment for everybody, of course.
FEATURES
By LYNN ELBER | December 17, 2005
LOS ANGELES -- John Spencer, who played a tough and dedicated politico on The West Wing who survived a serious illness to run for vice president, died of a heart attack yesterday. He was 58. Mr. Spencer died at a Los Angeles hospital, said his publicist, Ron Hofmann. He would have been 59 next week. Mr. Spencer played Leo McGarry, the savvy and powerful chief of staff to President Jeb Bartlet (Martin Sheen), on the NBC series. In a sad parallel to life, Mr. Spencer's character suffered a heart attack that forced him to give up his White House job. McGarry recovered and was picked as a running mate for Democratic presidential contender Matt Santos, played by Jimmy Smits; the campaign against Republican Arnold Vinick (Alan Alda)
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | November 25, 1991
ON AND OFF THE AIR:* Here's a question that is not going to be answered by tonight's last nostalgia-fest show on CBS, "Memories of 'M*A*S*H' " (at 9:30, Channel 11): Why have so few regulars from the popular 11-season series returned to TV with anything approaching regularity?When, for example, was the last time you saw Gary Burghoff (Radar O'Reilly) in anything? It might have been those computer firm ads he and some of the other "M*A*S*H" gang did a few years back.The post-war years have not meant unemployment for everybody, of course.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | November 20, 1991
LET ME BEGIN by saying that I'm not much of a crier myself, although given the right circumstances (bill for a new transmission, "Ol' Yeller" re-runs), I can bawl like a baby.Men first began crying openly in the late '70s, encouraged by the likes of Alan Alda and Phil Donahue, weepy guys with three-pack-a-day Kleenex habits who weren't afraid to show they were sensitive, vulnerable and so forth.Women (at least some of them) seemed to go for this. So pretty soon you had a lot of guys with robin-egg-blue leisure suits sobbing on women's shoulders during everything from foreign film presentations to the hatching of baby chicks.
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