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NEWS
March 29, 1992
When the team takes the field at Oriole Park at Camden Yards, you'll be watching the team. Gary and Alan Wilber will be watching the field.They grew it, every square of sod, on their farm in Salisbury.Gary Wilber, 28, and Alan Wilber, 32, began Oakwood Sod Farm, now the biggest on the lower Eastern Shore, in 1985 on the crop farm their father, Donald, started. In 1989, after the Orioles sent a representative to inspect their business, the Wilbers were selected to grow the sod for the new ballpark.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
John Hopkins University will bring four authors to campus this season who combine critical acclaim and popular appeal. The second annual President's Reading Series kicks off Sept. 23 with Canadian author Lawrence Hill, who recently completed writing a television miniseries adaptation of his 2007 novel, "The Book of Negroes. " (It was released in the U.S. under the title, "Someone Knows My Name. ") Booker Award-winning novelist, poet and short-story writer Alan Hollinghurst visits the campus on Oct. 21; the Sarajevo-born novelist Aleksandar Hemon, winner of a MacArthur Foundation "genius" grant will read from his work on March 31, and Zadie Smith, win of the Orange Prize For Fiction, will speak on April 28. All readings are free and open to the public.
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FEATURES
March 31, 2008
Critic's Pick -- Alan (Jon Cryer) goes on a date and learns a secret about his ex-girlfriend's sex life in Two and a Half Men (9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13).
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2014
Singing nuns have always proved irresistible. There was the Belgian sensation who made "Dominique" a chart-topper in the 1960s, Today, there's Sister Cristina Scuccia, the Sicilian star of Italian TV and YouTube who belts out Alicia Keys songs, and the sweet-voiced, Missouri-based Benedictines of Mary, Queen of Apostles, whose CDs of Gregorian chant are best-sellers. And coming to Baltimore this week are some very vocal nuns who get into the habit of shaking up church services at Queen of Angels Cathedral in Philadelphia with the help of high-voltage songs.
FEATURES
By From Ladies' Home Journal | July 24, 1994
"We were the best of friends when we first got married, but now Alan and I have only the shell of a marriage. Inside, there's nothing," says Jane, a 42-year-old teacher and mother of two school-age children."I'm sure everyone thinks things are just fine," she adds, and on the surface, they are. "We go out with friends and have a good time; we're there for our kids; we function like every other couple." Function is the key word, she explains, because as far as she's concerned, their marriage is more like a business relationship -- and a barely civil one at that.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | September 20, 1991
"Brooklyn Bridge" is "The Wonder Years" for the 1950s. It's sweet, sad, nostalgic and hopeful. It's a coming-of-age novel for the age of television. It's a winner.Instead of middle-class suburbia, "Brooklyn Bridge," premiering at 8 tonight on WBAL-TV (Channel 11), takes place in an all-Jewish apartment building in Brooklyn. In place of the Arnolds -- a nuclear family of mother, father and kids -- we have the Bergers and the Silvers -- an extended family of grandpa, grandma, mother, father and kids.
NEWS
By MARY BETH REGAN | December 9, 2005
Microbe: Are We Ready for the Next Plague? (By Alan P. Zelicoff and Michael Bellomo; Amacom, $23) This book hits close to home. As worldwide headlines warn of avian flu, Microbe argues that the United States is woefully unprepared for the next pandemic. Co-author Alan Zelicoff, formerly a top government scientist, puts forth a good argument for the need for an electronic surveillance system to enable health officials to share information about cluster illnesses. Zelicoff left his post at Sandia National Laboratories to join a private company developing such a system.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the sun | June 29, 2007
Annie Thomas, an 18-year-old counselor at the YMCA Summer Camp at Ellicott Mills Middle School, knew that magician Wayne Alan would not really cut off her hand. But, standing on stage, with her wrist locked into a frightening-looking contraption with a very sharp blade, she did feel a little nervous. "That blade was real," she said afterward, her hand still mercifully attached to her wrist. "He is really good." Alan, a professional magician, put on two shows at the YMCA camp Wednesday as part of his mission to warn kids about the dangers of smoking.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | June 3, 2006
A whole new world opened after I bought my first transistor radio. It was all of $6.99 and came from the old Shocket's on Gay Street, a few steps away from the Bel Air Market. It ran on a nine-volt battery, which we always bought on the cheap at Sunny's Surplus. That little plastic radio brought the voice of Alan Field into my room, a broadcast voice that will be on this morning for the final airing of his It's Showtime on WWLG, where he's the Saturday host. Come 9 a.m. Monday, that station will change formats and discontinue the pop music-oldies sound that I've chasing around for the past 46 years.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | July 28, 1991
A cemetery baking in the sun. Heat waves rise from an asphalt road that oozes past shimmering headstones.A plane roars overhead. In the working-class neighborhood across the way -- the blond brick homes are identical except for the initials on their aluminum awnings -- the streets are empty.A prairie wind whips up a brief blast-furnace breeze. Cicadas chirp unseen in the dust-covered bushes.FTC A cemetery worker sits in the shade of a monument, a little embarrassed that he has been seen.A young girl walks alone down the cemetery road.
NEWS
April 25, 2014
Before attending a presentation in Symphony Woods last weekend, I had already decided to vote for Alan Klein as Columbia Council rep for Harper's Choice. At this meeting I learned just how important it is for us to elect Alan. The way in which the Columbia Council has ignores the rights of Columbia residents is incredible. They have given away Symphony Woods to a private corporation that proposes to fill the park with gimmicky attractions. On top of that they are spending millions of dollars of our lien payments for these attractions.
NEWS
April 25, 2014
As a 40-year resident of Harper's Choice, I strongly support Alan Klein to be our next Columbia Association board representative in this Saturday's election. Through years of activism in our community, Alan has demonstrated his commitment to important values such as inclusion, openness and transparency. As our CA board rep, he will be a strong advocate and will ensure that we in Harper's Choice will be heard. Alan has shown a clear grasp of the serious issues facing the Columbia Association, and he will apply his keen intellect and consensus-building skills to ensuring that those issues are resolved with the whole community in mind.
NEWS
April 25, 2014
As a resident of Harper's Choice for 33 years, I am excited about the opportunity to have Alan Klein serve as our representative to the Columbia Council. Alan and I have worked together in the field of leadership and organizational change and for many years. I know him to be an independent thinker with insight and intelligence who always strives to treat others with respect. Alan has the kind of mind that enables him to grasp very complex, systemic issues, the kind of issues facing the Council as it grapples with decisions about Symphony Woods, open government and ensuring that lien payers receive real value for the fees we all pay. He consistently applies his skills in bringing people of divergent views together to come to a result that serves the common good.
NEWS
April 17, 2014
This is one in a series of submitted candidate profiles for the Columbia Association Elections.  The Columbia Association will hold elections on Saturday, April 26. During the elections, Columbia residents who pay the Columbia Association assessed fee can vote in their respective village for their village's representative to the 10-member Columbia Council, which becomes the 10-member Board of Directors. Each village hosts its own election. This year, there are only three contested races for the 10-member board.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
 An Emmy-winning actor, Peabody Award-winning documentarian and longtime CBS anchorman are among the seven personalities coming to town for the 2014-15 Baltimore Speakers Series. The Tuesday-evening series, presented by Stevenson University, kicks off Sept. 30 with Alan Alda, the Emmy-winning star of CBS's landmark TV series "M*A*S*H," and ends April 28, 2015 with former CBS anchorman Dan Rather. Other speakers in the series include former Australia Prime Minister Julia Gillard (Oct.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2013
Dr. Alan Ross, a longtime faculty member of the Johns Hopkins University whose love of numbers fed his career and also an enjoyment of baseball, died Sept. 7 at Roland Park Place. He was 87. He was born in Oxford, Ohio, to E.C and Madeliene Ross, and raised in both Oxford and Hamilton, Ohio, where his extended family lived. His father was an English professor at Miami University. Family members say as a youngster, Dr. Ross showed a predilection for learning, winning several state mathematics awards in school.
FEATURES
By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Evening Sun Staff | September 26, 1991
An excellent production of Peter Shaffer's Tony Award winning drama, "Equus," is on stage at the Towsontowne Arena Theatre through Oct. 16.The company, under the fine direction of Robert Clingan, is performing in the arena space below the stage at the Towsontowne Dinner Theatre Mondays through Wednesdays when the dinner theater is dark. (The dinner theater presents musicals. Currently "Show Boat" is on stage Thursdays through Sundays)."Equus" is the story of a confused 17-year-old boy, Alan Strang, dwelling in a Freudian fantasy world where he is compelled to create his own god, an equestrian deity he calls Equus.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | November 9, 1992
My rich friend Alan and his wife-to-be, Anne Marie, are car shopping, which is how, to his surprise, he comes to be studying a brochure on floor mats. Alan drives an '81 Honda Civic, which explains both why he is so rich and why he never really considered the merits of floor mats before. Doesn't old newspaper work just as well?Alan has this thing about money: He spends as little as possible. What he does with the rest -- and this may confuse some people -- is save it.For those of you who came to adulthood in the '80s, let me explain this concept.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2013
Howard County Councilwoman Courtney Watson joined the 2014 race for county executive today, pledging to safeguard the affluent Baltimore-Washington area's much-celebrated quality of life and to "do more, achieve more, for our citizens. " In prepared remarks, Watson, a 51-year-old Democrat from Ellicott City, lauded the achievements of the council's Democratic majority and County Executive Ken Ulman, also a Democrat. She vowed to "work hard to end homelessness in our county," and "to make our school system world class while bringing equal academic opportunities to each and every child.
EXPLORE
September 16, 2013
Sgt. Bruce Alan Reid of Joppa has been chosen by Aberdeen Proving Ground Federal Credit Union as its honoree in this year's "Spotlight a Soldier" program. Each year, the credit union invites members to submit essay nominations of local military service men or women to be honored. The promotion is launched annually in May, which is Military Appreciation Month. Reid was chosen by a panel of APGFCU judges who reviewed this year's submissions and selected him as the honoree. Since Sgt. Reid is serving his second deployment to Afghanistan, his father, Thomas Reid, accepted the $500 award on his son's behalf.
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