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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | April 15, 1995
It might take a Texas-size measure of stamina and fortitude, but if you can hang on through the first hour of "James Michener's 'Texas' " at 9 tomorrow night on ABC (WMAR-Channel 2), you've weathered the worst of this so-so miniseries.Things get a lot better in Monday night's conclusion of this four-hour fictionalized history of Texas. But "uneven" doesn't begin to cover what you'll see.The low end of the experience begins tomorrow night, when you realize in the opening minutes that Patrick Duffy is playing Stephen F. Austin with a range not quite worthy of the adjective "wooden."
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2013
From: Salta, Argentina Price: $13 Serve with: Full-flavored fish, turkey Torrontes is an exceptionally fine white wine grape, grown mostly in Argentina. This is an unusual version but a very good one. It's more full-bodied than typical wines from this grape. Its weight and texture are reminiscent of an Oregon pinot gris, which is not a bad thing. But where the typical torrontes might pair up with snapper, this version would be more salmon-friendly. It's intensely flavorful wine with flavors of mulling spices, pear and tropical fruit.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mark Bowden and By Mark Bowden,Special to the Sun | March 12, 2000
"The Gates of the Alamo," by Stephen Harrigan. Alfred A. Knopf. 581 pages. $25. In the winter of 1836, a force of 187 newly-declared "Texians" barricaded themselves in a ramshackle fort beside the Olmos River and for nearly two weeks held off 3,000 Mexican soldiers led by Santa Anna. The siege had an unhappy ending for the "Texians," who were eventually overrun by the generalisimo's forces and slaughtered to the last man. War follows its own logic, however. Defeat in one battle can sometimes result in victory overall.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2011
This is a wine for those who enjoy full-flavored, New World-style red wines. The malbec grape's ancestry may be French but this is a very Argentine wine from the exceptional Catena winery. It's a full-bodied, creamy-textured wine with enormous blackberry fruit and a distinct but pleasant gamy quality and hints of coffee and chocolate. It's fully dry, but there are echoes of the flavor of a good vintage Porto. Wine Find: 2008 Alamos Seleccion Malbec From: Mendoza, Argentina Price: $20 Serve with: Hearty stews, game, beef
BUSINESS
By Tom Belden and Tom Belden,Knight-Ridder News Service | January 14, 1991
After nine months of test marketing, Alamo Rent-a-Car is going nationwide with three price levels for travelers who want to buy collision-damage coverage for rental vehicles.Under the Alamo pricing structure, a renter who wants to buy the optional collision-damage coverage can pay a daily fee of $3, $6 or $9. Most other rental companies offer only one price -- about $12 a day -- for the complete coverage that Alamo offers for $9 a day. So far, one other car-rental company, General, has matched Alamo's three prices.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | January 19, 1995
Capt. Samuel Hamilton Walker, who was killed in 1847 during the Mexican War leading a company of mostly Maryland recruits, finally can rest in peace.The remains of the Maryland-born war hero, who contributed to the design of the Colt six-shooter, have been spared a fourth reburial. An agreement last week also has averted a Texas-sized furor over the possible remains of the defenders of the Alamo.The city of San Antonio agreed to remove trash and address other problems that have marred the site of Walker's grave.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | November 8, 1996
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- Republic Industries Inc. will buy Alamo Rent-A-Car Inc. for about $625 million in stock, gaining a source of vehicles for Chairman H. Wayne Huizenga's chain of used-car super stores.Republic outbid an earlier offer of less than $500 million from HFS Inc., analysts said.The move comes two months after the collapse of Republic's $4 billion offer for security company ADT Ltd., which owns the second-largest auto auction company.Alamo, the nation's No. 4 car rental company, will give Republic's AutoNation USA a leg up on its main rival, Circuit City Stores Inc.'s CarMax used car stores.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 9, 2004
Thank goodness for Davy Crockett; without him, the Alamo could have proven the blandest heroic siege in movie history. Advance billing has trumpeted The Alamo as a true depiction of the battle that swayed Texans' hearts and minds toward independence - a problematic assertion, given how little really is known of what actually happened on that February morning back in 1836. All the fort's defenders died, meaning history has had to rely on legend and the accounts of the victorious Mexicans, who failed to report in detail the manner in which the rebellious Texans were killed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn Whipp and Glenn Whipp,LOS ANGELES DAILY NEWS | April 8, 2004
History is very messy, and Texas history is messier than most. So says filmmaker Joseph Tovares, a Texas native, whose well-received film, Remember the Alamo, premiered this year on PBS' American Experience. "The frontier was a very unforgiving place. It was never about good guys and bad guys. The truth is in the gray areas." Messy history makes for interesting reading, but it has a tougher time fitting into the time constraints of a feature film. John Lee Hancock, another Texas native, knew that two years ago when he agreed to update that most famous slice of Lone Star history, The Alamo.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen R. Proctor and By Stephen R. Proctor,Sun Staff | January 14, 2001
"A Line in the Sand: The Alamo in Blood and Memory," by Randy Roberts and James N. Olson. The Free Press. 352 pages. $26. No event in U.S. history has been more mythologized than the battle of the Alamo. Disney's Davy Crockett trilogy was, after all, the granddaddy of movies with merchandising spin-offs, generating a craze for all things Davy that eclipses even "Star Wars." Yet, visiting the Alamo, standing where Col. William Barret Travis drew a line in the sand and dared those who would stand with him to cross over, it's hard not to be moved by the bravery of men who chose to stay and fight knowing they would be slaughtered.
TRAVEL
By San Jose Mercury News | October 1, 2006
Our group, the World War II War Brides, is having its annual reunion in San Antonio. Can you recommend activities for a group that is mostly handicapped? Also, where can we rent wheelchairs? Two of the city's most popular sites, the Alamo and San Antonio River Walk, are almost entirely accessible to disabled guests. The Alamo's walking surface is flat, except for its exit, which has a few steps - but you'll be able to leave through the entrance. River Walk, a network of walkways on the San Antonio River with shopping, restaurants and great views, has several ramps and elevators and one accessible bridge to cross the river.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,Sun Staff | May 8, 2005
109 East Palace: Robert Oppenheimer and the Secret City of Los Alamos, by Jennet Conant. Simon & Schuster. 432 pages. $26.95. The 60th anniversary of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki this year has unleashed a flurry of books about the Manhattan Project and some of its most colorful figures. But in 109 East Palace, Jennet Conant stakes out less-trafficked territory, producing an engaging portrait of life on the remote mesa that served as backdrop for the world's most audacious scientific enterprise.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 1, 2005
A blog rebellion among scientists and engineers at Los Alamos, the federal government's premier nuclear weapons laboratory, is threatening to end the tenure of its director, G. Peter Nanos. Four months of jeers, denunciations and defenses of Nanos' management recently culminated in dozens of signed and anonymous messages concluding that his days were numbered. The postings to a public Web log conveyed a mood of self-congratulation tempered with sober discussion of what comes next. "Some here will celebrate that they have been able to run the sheriff out of Dodge," Gary Stradling, a veteran Los Alamos scientist who is a staunch defender of Nanos, wrote Tuesday on the blog.
BUSINESS
By DOW JONES | April 26, 2005
McLEAN, Va. - Northrop Grumman Corp. plans to bid on a seven-year contract to manage Los Alamos National Laboratory, a Department of Energy facility now run by the University of California. The contract is worth about $2.2 billion a year and has extension options that could add 13 years to the management deal, putting the total value at about $44 billion over a 20-year period, the Los Angeles-based aerospace and defense company said yesterday. Northrop, with $29.85 billion in sales for 2005, said it has experience with many of the scientific areas under research at Los Alamos.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 18, 2004
A series of safety accidents, not just security lapses, prompted the director of Los Alamos National Laboratory to halt nearly all operations there Friday. Los Alamos, one of the nation's two nuclear weapons laboratories, is under heavy criticism because of the disappearance on July 7 of two computer data storage devices containing classified information from its weapons physics division. But in broadening a shutdown of classified work Thursday to include the entire laboratory Friday, G. Peter Nanos, the laboratory's director, cited safety and environmental concerns as well as security issues.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 9, 2004
Thank goodness for Davy Crockett; without him, the Alamo could have proven the blandest heroic siege in movie history. Advance billing has trumpeted The Alamo as a true depiction of the battle that swayed Texans' hearts and minds toward independence - a problematic assertion, given how little really is known of what actually happened on that February morning back in 1836. All the fort's defenders died, meaning history has had to rely on legend and the accounts of the victorious Mexicans, who failed to report in detail the manner in which the rebellious Texans were killed.
BUSINESS
By Tom Belden and Tom Belden,Knight-Ridder News Service | May 4, 1992
In a move similar to the airlines' new fare structure, Alamo Rent A Car recently launched a basic three-level rate system for renting cars on weekends through June 24.In response, other car rental companies, including industry leader Hertz Corp., quickly lowered some weekend rates. Some, including Dollar Rent A Car, trumpeted the fact that in some cities their rates were already about the same or lower than Alamo's.But there's more going on here than just another price war, the kind of bloody battle that often crops up as business tries to work its way back from a recession.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Knight Ridder / Tribune | March 3, 2002
AUSTIN, Texas -- From coonskin caps to lunchboxes and cap pistols, Davy Crockett memorabilia has made the Alamo hero and American frontiersman the country's greatest pop culture symbol, right? It is an arguable position, but at the Bob Bullock Texas State History Museum in Austin, a new exhibit could sway the most ardent objector. The exhibit, Sunrise in His Pocket: The Life, Legend and Legacy of Davy Crockett, opened this weekend and will run through Aug. 18. It is a collection of bona fide Crockett artifacts, including a flintlock rifle and pages of personal letters.
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