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NEWS
May 6, 1995
WJZ-TV news anchor Al Sanders used to say he was "just the guy next door." Viewers sensed that and responded. They felt at home with Al; they felt comfortable with Channel 13.The death of Al Sanders at 54 robs Baltimore television of one its most endearing, and enduring, personalities.After Al Sanders began co-anchoring the news with the legendary Jerry Turner in April 1977, WJZ's local news operation earned an industry-wide reputation for exceptional success and stability. In the turbulent world of television, where ratings shifted overnight and anchormen and women were replaced to fit whatever format was in vogue at the moment, WJZ newscasts consistently had No. 1 ratings, not only in the Baltimore regional market but nationally for the stunning extent of its market penetration.
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FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,SUN STAFF | October 20, 1996
The 6 o'clock newscast wasn't half over when the panic descended. Once again, Denise Koch didn't see it coming. Although she never perspired under the TV lights, sweat now trickled down her neck. She stared at the TelePrompTer, struggling to keep the words from becoming a fuzzy jumble. The studio was spinning.Sad thoughts had brought this on, she told herself. Thoughts of delivering WJZ's news without her close friend and colleague Al Sanders, who was dying of lung cancer. And thoughts of being apart from her twin infant daughters, who had gotten out of the hospital barely a month before.
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NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | May 6, 1995
The obituary of WJZ anchorman Al Sanders in Saturday's editions gave an incorrect age for one of the surviving children, Brandon. The correct age is 24.The Sun regrets the error.Al Sanders, who came into Baltimore's living rooms every weeknight for two decades as anchorman for WJZ-TV, died yesterday of lung cancer. He was 54.Mr. Sanders, who had been receiving chemotherapy treatments as an outpatient at the Johns Hopkins Oncology Center, was admitted to the hospital Thursday. He died there yesterday, surrounded by his wife, Ruth, and their three children.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | January 2, 1996
Has there ever been a better name for an anchorman?Vic Carter. It jumps off the tongue so easily, so quickly. One syllable followed by two, some good, hard consonants sandwiching some short, pithy vowels.Vic Carter, anchorman. It just sounds so right.WJZ's new anchor, who debuts tonight, would no doubt be embarrassed by the suggestion his name sounds like something out of a textbook. There's nothing special about him, he emphasizes repeatedly. If you don't mind, he'd really rather have his picture taken without the sports jacket.
FEATURES
May 5, 1995
WJZ anchorman Al Sanders was hospitalized and listed in critical condition yesterday, according to statement from station management."Al Sanders is back in the hospital after undergoing several weeks of outpatient chemotherapy treatment for lung cancer," WJZ Vice President and General Manager Marcellus Alexander said.4 "His condition has unexpectedly turned critical."Family, friends and all of us at WJZ TV ask you to join us in praying for his well-being. We ask that the privacy of his family be respected at this time," Mr. Alexander concluded.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | September 1, 1995
Today at 2 p.m., Baltimore is paying a final salute to the late Al Sanders, WJZ-TV's news and anchorman for many years. The corner of Druid Park Drive and Malden Avenue will be renamed Al Sanders Place in memory of this delightful man who died of cancer in May.And to make the salute complete, the city is moving Jerry Turner Way, from the 3700 block of Malden (which leads up to WJZ's studios) to the 3600 block so that it intersects with Al Sanders Place. Until his death from cancer in 1987, Turner co-anchored WJZ's popular newscast with Sanders.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | May 10, 1995
Country music has gotten pretty cool on TV, as evidenced by NBC's three-hour commitment to the annual "Country Music Awards," which includes a retrospective of 30 years of No. 1 country hits. And ABC's comedy lineup has some interesting developments.* "The 30th Annual Academy of Country Music Awards" (8 p.m.-11 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Clint Black, Tanya Tucker and comedian Jeff Foxworthy are hosts of the live broadcast. Scheduled performers include Garth Brooks, Reba McEntire, Alabama, John Anderson, Brooks & Dunn, Vince Gill, Alan Jackson, Tracy Lawrence, Barbara Mandrell, Willie Nelson and Pam Tillis.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | May 7, 1995
In Michael Olesker's column last Sunday, the success of the former WJZ news anchor team of Al Sanders and Jerry Turner was incorrectly stated. The column should have said that the team was among the most successful, and dominant, local anchor teams in the nation for almost a decade.The Sun regrets the error.On New Year's Eve of 1987, Al Sanders reached over and gently touched Denise Koch's arm. She squeezed his hand. Seconds later they were on the air, doing the 11 o'clock news and announcing that Jerry Turner, the legendary television anchor, was dead.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | May 26, 1995
If they proved nothing else, the local TV ratings during the crucial May sweeps period showed just how much Baltimore loved Al Sanders.The A. C. Nielsen overnight ratings book released yesterday reads like a tribute to the WJZ-TV anchorman who died May 5, less than six weeks after being diagnosed with lung cancer.From the time his death was announced through his burial May 10, the three main newscasts on WJZ each showed a phenomenal increase in audience compared with the previous week, as tens of thousands of viewers tuned in for news and tributes to Mr. Sanders.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Mark Guidera contributed to this article | May 11, 1995
Television anchorman Al Sanders' funeral was fit for a dignitary, with police cars and motorcycles lining the streets of Columbia, and television crews waiting for glimpses of well-known politicians who came to pay their respects.But inside the Wilde Lake Interfaith Center -- in Columbia where he lived -- more than 600 mourners heard eulogies for Al Sanders, the reliable colleague, the jazz fan, the great father who played silly jokes on his children.The award-winning anchorman, who was at WJZ-TV for more than two decades, died Friday of lung cancer.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | October 27, 1995
Once every week or so, Christopher Gay drives to the end of Ridermark Row in the Hobbit's Glen neighborhood of Columbia to look at the dream house that his late father, popular TV announcer Al Sanders, designed and built but never lived in."That house is a big symbol of my father, just one of the little things that went with my father," Mr. Gay, 19, says. "That house is very significant to my family."Mr. Sanders used to say that the 7,000-square-foot house overlooking the Hobbit's Glen golf course was his wife Ruth's dream house, Mr. Gay recalls, "but he really loved it. He took pictures every week.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | September 1, 1995
Today at 2 p.m., Baltimore is paying a final salute to the late Al Sanders, WJZ-TV's news and anchorman for many years. The corner of Druid Park Drive and Malden Avenue will be renamed Al Sanders Place in memory of this delightful man who died of cancer in May.And to make the salute complete, the city is moving Jerry Turner Way, from the 3700 block of Malden (which leads up to WJZ's studios) to the 3600 block so that it intersects with Al Sanders Place. Until his death from cancer in 1987, Turner co-anchored WJZ's popular newscast with Sanders.
NEWS
May 26, 1995
Question of FactsJohn O'Donnell's May 16 article repeats the GOP propaganda line by quoting Sen. Lauch Faircloth: "The root cause of the problems in welfare . . . is children born out of wedlock. If we don't address this, we're simply never going to reduce welfare dependency."Mr. O'Donnell then goes on to quote Sen. Phil Gramm: "We have got to stop giving people more and more money to have more and more children."Why did not Mr. O'Donnell bother to mention that this line of reasoning is based on scholarship which was recanted by its author, Charles Murray, a year ago?
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | May 26, 1995
If they proved nothing else, the local TV ratings during the crucial May sweeps period showed just how much Baltimore loved Al Sanders.The A. C. Nielsen overnight ratings book released yesterday reads like a tribute to the WJZ-TV anchorman who died May 5, less than six weeks after being diagnosed with lung cancer.From the time his death was announced through his burial May 10, the three main newscasts on WJZ each showed a phenomenal increase in audience compared with the previous week, as tens of thousands of viewers tuned in for news and tributes to Mr. Sanders.
NEWS
May 24, 1995
Real DemagoguesI feel the need to comment on the May 14 editorial "Zero Tolerance for Demagogy."My objection to the editorial stems from The Sun's attempt to paint the National Rifle Association as some sort of villainous hate group.The NRA is a 124-year-old organization that has spent most of its existence scheduling target shooting events and teaching firearm safety.Only in recent years, when it became obvious that a small minority of hard-core anti-gun extremists was determined to eliminate our right to bear arms altogether, did the NRA see a need to become politically active.
NEWS
May 12, 1995
Not Either/OrIn his column of April 29, Tom Horton accuses the 104th Congress of mounting a "successful attack to dismantle a quarter-century of environmental progress."He singles me out for special criticism, writing that I "claim" to care about the Chesapeake Bay. He also observes that the League of Conservation Voters gave me a score of zero out of a possible 100 for my votes on 10 alleged "environmental issues."It is factually wrong, and irresponsible in the context of a debate, to suggest that Republican members of Congress are unconcerned about environmental issues.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | January 2, 1996
Has there ever been a better name for an anchorman?Vic Carter. It jumps off the tongue so easily, so quickly. One syllable followed by two, some good, hard consonants sandwiching some short, pithy vowels.Vic Carter, anchorman. It just sounds so right.WJZ's new anchor, who debuts tonight, would no doubt be embarrassed by the suggestion his name sounds like something out of a textbook. There's nothing special about him, he emphasizes repeatedly. If you don't mind, he'd really rather have his picture taken without the sports jacket.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,SUN STAFF | October 20, 1996
The 6 o'clock newscast wasn't half over when the panic descended. Once again, Denise Koch didn't see it coming. Although she never perspired under the TV lights, sweat now trickled down her neck. She stared at the TelePrompTer, struggling to keep the words from becoming a fuzzy jumble. The studio was spinning.Sad thoughts had brought this on, she told herself. Thoughts of delivering WJZ's news without her close friend and colleague Al Sanders, who was dying of lung cancer. And thoughts of being apart from her twin infant daughters, who had gotten out of the hospital barely a month before.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Mark Guidera contributed to this article | May 11, 1995
Television anchorman Al Sanders' funeral was fit for a dignitary, with police cars and motorcycles lining the streets of Columbia, and television crews waiting for glimpses of well-known politicians who came to pay their respects.But inside the Wilde Lake Interfaith Center -- in Columbia where he lived -- more than 600 mourners heard eulogies for Al Sanders, the reliable colleague, the jazz fan, the great father who played silly jokes on his children.The award-winning anchorman, who was at WJZ-TV for more than two decades, died Friday of lung cancer.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | May 10, 1995
Country music has gotten pretty cool on TV, as evidenced by NBC's three-hour commitment to the annual "Country Music Awards," which includes a retrospective of 30 years of No. 1 country hits. And ABC's comedy lineup has some interesting developments.* "The 30th Annual Academy of Country Music Awards" (8 p.m.-11 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Clint Black, Tanya Tucker and comedian Jeff Foxworthy are hosts of the live broadcast. Scheduled performers include Garth Brooks, Reba McEntire, Alabama, John Anderson, Brooks & Dunn, Vince Gill, Alan Jackson, Tracy Lawrence, Barbara Mandrell, Willie Nelson and Pam Tillis.
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